This fascinating case study describes the work of the people responsible for creating festive lore and its system of ceremonies and festivities—an inseparable part of every culture. In the case of the new modern Hebrew culture of Eretz Israel (modern Jewish Palestine)—a society of immigrants that left behind most of their traditional folkways—the creation of festival lore was a conscious and organized process guided by a national ideology and aesthetic values. This creative effort in a secular national society served as an alternative to the traditional religious system, adapted the ceremonies and festivals to a new historical reality, and created a new festival cycle that would give expression and joy to the values and symbols of the new Jewish society.Staging and Stagers in Modern Jewish Palestine claims that the system of ceremonies and festivals, in general, and each separate ceremony and festival were staged according to the staging instructions written by a defined group of cultural activists. The book examines three main stages—the educational network, rural society (particularly the cooperative sector), and urban society (most notably Tel Aviv)—and looks at the stagers themselves, who were schoolteachers, writers, artists, and cultural activists. Though cultural systems of festivals and ceremonies are often researched and described, scholarly literature rarely identifies their creators or studies in detail the manner in which these systems are created. Staging and Stagers in Modern Jewish Palestine sheds important light on the stagers of modern Jewish Palestine and also on the processes and mechanisms that created the performative lore in other cultures, in ancient as well as modern times.
The promotion and vernacularization of Hebrew, traditionally a language of Jewish liturgy and study, was a central accomplishment of the Zionist movement in Palestine in the years following World War I. Viewing twentieth-century history through the lens of language, author Liora Halperin questions the accepted scholarly narrative of a Zionist move away from multilingualism, demonstrating how Jews in Palestine remained connected linguistically by both preference and necessity to a world outside the boundaries of the pro-Hebrew community even as it promoted Hebrew and achieved that language’s dominance. The story of language encounters in Jewish Palestine is a fascinating tale of shifting power relationships, both locally and globally. Halperin’s absorbing study explores how a young national community was compelled to modify the dictates of Hebrew exclusivity as it negotiated its relationships with its Jewish population, Palestinian Arabs, the British, and others outside the margins of the national project and ultimately came to terms with the limitations of its hegemony in an interconnected world.
Provides a rich harvest of Jewish customs and traditional beliefs, gathered from all over the world and from ancient to modern times.
This work, the first of its kind, describes all the aspects of the Bible revolution in Jewish history in the last two hundred years, as well as the emergence of the new biblical culture. It describes the circumstances and processes that turned Holy Scripture into the Book of Books and into the history of the biblical period and of the Jewish people. It deals with the encounter of the Jews with modern biblical criticism, the archaeological research of the Ancient Near East, with contemporary archaeology, the Bible-Babel polemic at the start of the twentieth century, and the use of the bible as a “guide to life” in education, culture and politics.
Pathbreaking research offers new hope for treating brain diseases and injuries and for maintaining brain health even into old age.
Picking up from Apprentice in Budapest, the first volume of Raphael Patai's autobiography, Journeyman in Jerusalem presents the fascinating journey of a young scholar struggling to make his way in the midst of often trying circumstances while a nation-in-the-making struggles to establish itself. The book covers fifteen years--1933 to 1947--during which the Yishuv, the Jewish community of Palestine, experienced one of the most turbulent periods of its history. This volume is an invaluable record of this era and of the early life of its author, who was to become one of the most respected Jewish scholars of the twentieth century.
There are a number of unanswered questions which indicate that the Standard Model, successful as it is, cannot be the entire story. One solution to answering these questions is that the Standard Model is an effective low-energy theory of structure hopefully nearby in its energy scale in much the same way that a model of strong interactions among nucleons mediated by pions is an effective theory for the strong interactions of quarks mediated by coloured gluons. This book reviews the Standard Model and then examines the current status of composite models. After developing criteria for judging such models the text discusses two of the major indicators of compositeness, triviality and naturalness. Using this framework as a background the various models are summarized and discussed. This monograph concludes with a chapter describing the constraints imposed on composite models by current measurements of decay rates, magnetic moment measurements, flavour changing processes etc. and describing other ways to look for signatures of compositeness.This monograph attempts to be thorough, covering all aspects of composite models, as found in the literature at the time of completion of the manuscript. As such it should be of interest to any experimental or theoretical physicist having an interest in the subject. The review of the Standard Model in the first chapter is written in such a way that anyone with a basic knowledge of Quantum Field Theory should be able to understand the entire text. As such it could also be used for supplementary reading in graduate courses.
In 2004, internationally known physicist Haim Harari was invited to address the advisory board of a major multinational corporation. In a short speech he offered a penetrating analysis of the components of terror, and presented a passionate call for a new era in the Middle East. The speech, entitled "A View from the Eye of the Storm," was not intended for publication, but when a copy was leaked and posted onto the Internet, it caused a worldwide sensation, eventually being translated into more than half a dozen languages. Now—as the modern era of Islamic terror continues to unfold—Harari reaches further, to offer this serious yet accessible survey of the landscape of Middle Eastern war and peace at this challenging crossroads in history. Moving beyond the sterile discourse of foreign affairs journals, Harari encourages the world to view the Middle East through the eyes of a "proverbial taxi driver," a man on the street whose wisdom (and sense of humor) outstrips that of the experts. And, as he observes, to anyone familiar with the Middle East from a taxi driver's perspective, the "persistent ugly storm" engulfing the Arab world is far more than a territorial battle with Israel: It is an "undeclared World War III" that rages from Bali to Madrid, from Nairobi to New York, from Buenos Aires to Istanbul, and from Tunis to Moscow. The sad result is that much of the Arab world has become an "unprecedented breeding ground for cruel dictators, terror networks, fanaticism, incitement, suicide murders, and general decline." And unless the free nations of the world mobilize to stop it, Harari argues, this new world war will continue to cause bloodshed on all continents. As a fifth-generation Israeli-born observer, Harari includes a thorough response to the conventional wisdom about Middle Eastern affairs, including a frank dissection of the media's lopsided portrait of the Arab-Israeli conflict. Drawing on his family's two centuries of life in the Middle East, he offers a compelling catalog of the steps necessary to reach a lasting peace between Israel and the Palestinians—steps, he writes, that are "inevitable—not because everybody accepts them today, but because all sides must accept them before peace can be achieved." And he urges the civilized world to combat terror by isolating its state sponsors, blocking its funding, and promoting education, women's equality, and human rights reform. Eloquent in its simplicity, written with passion, humor, and the directness of a scientist who has spent a lifetime explaining his work to the general public, A View from the Eye of the Storm is that rare book with the power to change hearts and minds.
First Published in 1987. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Annotation A masterpiece of modern Yiddish literature, the first volume of memoirs by Yekhezkel Kotik, translated into English and annotated.
Arab Folktales from Palestine and Israel is a collection of twenty-eight tales with insight into the Arab culture by Raphael Patai.
The Jews of Kurdistan is a unique historical document in that it presents a picture of Kurdish Jewish life and culture prior to World War II.
In 1839, Muslims attacked the Jews of Meshhed, murdering 36 of them, and forcing the conversion of the rest. While some managed to escape across the Afghan border, and some turned into true believing Muslims, the majority adopted Islam only outwardly, while secretly adhering to their Jewish faith. Jadid al-Islam is the fascinating story of how this community managed to survive, at the risk of their lives, as crypto-Jews in an inimical Shi'i Muslim environment. Based on unpublished original Persian sources and interviews with members of the existing Meshhed community in Jerusalem and New York, this study documents the history, traditions, tales, customs, and institutions of the Jadid al-Islam—"New Muslims."
A groundbreaking and comprehensive study of the Sephardic folktale as it relates to group identity and narrative culture.
An exhaustive study of how Jews imagined the idea of Europe and how it existed in their collective memory from the Enlightenment to the present
Examining the mystical practices associated with food in zoharic kabbalah and the ways they inform us about the kabbalistic experience of embodiment.
Explores the cultural connection between Syrian Jewish life and Arab culture in present-day Brooklyn, New York, through liturgical music.
Portrays the experiences of Egyptian Karaites in the San Francisco Bay Area as it explores the relationship between text and everyday life, between literal reading and its translation into bodily practices-especially as related to the female body.

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