"The Mirzayanov case is an immediate legal litmus test of emerging Russian democracy. He is an individual in the true tradition of Andrei Sakharov, a man persecuted under the former regime for telling the truth, but now, rightfully, universally honored."--Dan Ellsberg, author.
A shocking murder at the Palace of Westminster draws Edinburgh's toughest cop into a complex new case... Skinner is plunged into a web of politics and enemies in STATE SECRETS, the twenty-eighth mystery in Quintin Jardine's bestselling crime series. Not to be missed by readers of Ian Rankin and Peter May. Praise for Quintin Jardine's gritty novels: 'Well constructed, fast-paced...many an ingenious twist and turn' Observer Former Chief Constable Bob Skinner is long out of the police force but trouble has a habit of following him around. So it is that he finds himself in the Palace of Westminster as a shocking act befalls the nation. Hours before the Prime Minister is due to make a controversial statement, she is discovered in her office with a letter opener driven through her skull. Is the act political? Personal? Or even one of terror? Skinner is swiftly enlisted by the Security Service to lead the investigation. Reunited with Met Police Commander Neil McIlhenney, he has forty-eight hours to crack the case - before the press unleash their wrath. There are many in the tangled web of government with cause to act. But the outcome will be one that not even Skinner himself could predict...
The mesmerizing story of Hillary Clinton's political rebirth, based on eyewitness accounts from deep inside her inner circle Hillary Clinton’s surprising defeat in the 2008 Democratic primary brought her to the nadir of her political career, vanquished by a much younger opponent whose message of change and cutting-edge tech team ran circles around her stodgy campaign. And yet, six years later, she has reemerged as an even more powerful and influential figure, a formidable stateswoman and the presumed front-runner for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination, marking one of the great political comebacks in history. The story of Hillary’s phoenixlike rise is at the heart of HRC, a riveting political biography that journeys into the heart of “Hillaryland” to discover a brilliant strategist at work. Masterfully unfolded by Politico’s Jonathan Allen and The Hill’s Amie Parnes from more than two hundred top-access interviews with Hillary’s intimates, colleagues, supporters, and enemies, HRC portrays a seasoned operator who negotiates political and diplomatic worlds with equal savvy. Loathed by the Obama team in the wake of the primary, Hillary worked to become the president’s greatest ally, their fates intertwined in the work of reestablishing America on the world stage. HRC puts readers in the room with Hillary during the most intense and pivotal moments of this era, as she mulls the president-elect’s offer to join the administration, pulls the strings to build a coalition for his war against Libya, and scrambles to deal with the fallout from the terrible events in Benghazi—all while keeping one eye focused on 2016. HRC offers a rare look inside the merciless Clinton political machine, as Bill Clinton handled the messy business of avenging Hillary’s primary loss while she tried to remain above the partisan fray. Exploring her friendships and alliances with Robert Gates, David Petraeus, Leon Panetta, Joe Biden, and the president himself, Allen and Parnes show how Hillary fundamentally transformed the State Department through the force of her celebrity and her unparalleled knowledge of how power works in Washington. Filled with deep reporting and immersive storytelling, this remarkable portrait of the most important female politician in American history is an essential inside look at the woman who may be our next president. From the Hardcover edition.
She's about to become a lot more than just an assignment to this undercover secret agent… don't miss this reader favorite from #1 New York Times bestselling author Linda Lael Miller! Cookbook author Holly Llewellyn is the last person who should be labeled an “enemy of the state”—or is she? After all, her brother is a missing traitor, and with her ties to the president, the Secret Service isn't taking chances. So they send in agent David Goddard, undercover. But after one glance, David knows Holly isn't just an “assignment”—she's a woman who'll change his life. But first, he'll have to keep her safe from the enemy that will remain hidden at all costs until they can strike… Originally published in 1985
"In this provocative and original book, Rahul Sagar resolves a core dilemma of executive power in a democracy. He shows how the justification for secrecy and accountability for its misuse both hover outside the normal legal order. Elegant in its symmetry and uncanny in its timing."--Jeffrey K. Tulis, University of Texas at Austin "Rahul Sagar investigates the mirror problems of government secrecy and the leaking of government secrets. There are no easy solutions to these problems, and Sagar doesn't pretend there are. Instead, he provides a rigorous, judicious, and clear-eyed analysis of the tradeoffs that policymakers must make, and the uneasy compromises that must be reached. The book comes at a vital time, and is indispensable for current debates about NSA surveillance and related counterterrorism activities."--Eric A. Posner, coauthor of The Executive Unbound "A truly excellent and provocative book. Secrets and Leaks makes an outstanding contribution to an issue of contemporary concern that will not go away--and will probably become far more serious--in the future."--Sanford Levinson, author of Our Undemocratic Constitution "Sagar examines the very hot topic of the role of leaks and whistleblowing in democracy. He argues that they are fundamental to democratic politics generally and American democracy specifically, but he is subtle and informed enough to recognize the dangers of whistleblowing, particularly on matters of national security. Sagar could well launch a new literature on the subject."--Corey Brettschneider, author of When the State Speaks, What Should It Say?
Following the release of MI5 files into the British National Archives, the author re-examines a notorious case of espionage at the American Embassy in London during 1939-1940 when 'Top Secret' correspondence between Franklin Roosevelt and Winston Churchill was leaked. Their correspondence was potentially damaging to both men because Churchill had not stepped up as Prime Minister and the United States had not then entered the war. Moreover, Roosevelt was coming up for re-election in November 1940 with the pledge that 'I have said this before but I shall say it again and again and again; your boys are not going to be sent into any foreign wars'. Tyler Kent, a code and cipher clerk at the Embassy, would admit collecting Embassy documents that he considered 'interesting' and sharing these with Anna Wolkoff, a Russian-born dress designer, and Captain Archibald Ramsay, the Conservative MP for Peebles. Joseph P. Kennedy, the American Ambassador, waived Kent's diplomatic immunity and all three were arrested. Kent and Wolkoff were tried in secret in October 1940 when they were handed down sentences of 7 and 10 years; and Ramsay was interned without trial until September 1944. Two Canadian journalists who sensed a good story were also interned. There have been many colourful cover stories published of Kent and Wolkoff's activities over the years but only now has it been possible to publish The Full Story, which includes compelling evidence of Roosevelt's warlike intent, a MI5 sting operation, perjury and the manipulation of Court documents.
An NPR Best Book of the Year From a veteran insider with over twenty years’ experience in the U.S. Foreign Service comes a taut, insightful thriller of global intrigue and behind-the-scenes international politics. Sam Trainor’s career of overseas work coupled with a penchant for being outspoken has left him on the outside of the competitive Washington establishment. Formerly the top South Asia expert in the State Department’s Bureau of Intelligence and Research, Trainor has moved to the private sector, working as an analyst for the consulting firm Argus Systems. But Sam soon discovers that for all their similarities, the government and their hired contractors have vastly different motives. As he struggles to adjust to a more corporate, profit-driven version of the work that had been his life, he stumbles across an intelligence anomaly—the transcript of a phone conversation about the fastest ways to upend the delicate political balance keeping India and Pakistan from all-out war. Yet Sam knows that conversation can’t have occurred—because he is having an affair with one of the alleged participants. As he digs into the source of this misinformation, he realizes that more is at stake than just bad intel. Someone is deliberately twisting the intelligence to stoke the simmering conflict between India and Pakistan, nuclear-armed rivals that have already fought multiple wars. And Sam’s new employer could be up to its neck in it. From the Hardcover edition.
Secrets and Leaks examines the complex relationships among executive power, national security, and secrecy. State secrecy is vital for national security, but it can also be used to conceal wrongdoing. How then can we ensure that this power is used responsibly? Typically, the onus is put on lawmakers and judges, who are expected to oversee the executive. Yet because these actors lack access to the relevant information and the ability to determine the harm likely to be caused by its disclosure, they often defer to the executive's claims about the need for secrecy. As a result, potential abuses are more often exposed by unauthorized disclosures published in the press. But should such disclosures, which violate the law, be condoned? Drawing on several cases, Rahul Sagar argues that though whistleblowing can be morally justified, the fear of retaliation usually prompts officials to act anonymously--that is, to "leak" information. As a result, it becomes difficult for the public to discern when an unauthorized disclosure is intended to further partisan interests. Because such disclosures are the only credible means of checking the executive, Sagar writes, they must be tolerated, and, at times, even celebrated. However, the public should treat such disclosures skeptically and subject irresponsible journalism to concerted criticism.
On October 6, 1948, a U.S. Air Force B-29 Superfortress crashed soon after takeoff, killing three civilian engineers and six crew members. In June 1949, the engineers' widows filed suit against the government, determined to find out what exactly had happened to their husbands and why the three civilians had been on board the airplane in the first place. But it was the dawn of the Cold War and the Air Force refused to hand over any documents, claiming they contained classified information. The legal battle ultimately reached the Supreme Court, which in 1953 handed down a landmark decision that would, in later years, enable the government to conceal gross negligence and misconduct, block troublesome litigation, and detain criminal suspects without due-process protections. Claim of Privilege is a mesmerizing true account of a shameful incident and its lasting impact on our nation—the gripping story of a courageous fight to right a past wrong and a powerful indictment of governmental abuse in the name of national security.
Stored in Whitehall's archives are everything from blood-chilling warnings of imminent nuclear attack to comical details of daily life in the corridors of power. Adam Macqueen, author of the highly acclaimed bestseller Private Eye: The First 50 Years, presents us with some of the most unlikely revelations since the Official secrets act was inaugurated one hundred years ago. Not only about Mrs Thatcher's ironing board, but Ted Heath's car, Harold Macmillan's bedroom carpet, Imelda Marcos and her son Bong Bong's trip to Buckingham Palace and President Eisenhower's particular problem with Winston Churchill's trousers
Examines modern trends in intelligence oversight development and how these mechanisms bolster an internal security system, increasing the secrecy of the intelligence enterprise.
There is a hidden country within the United States. It was formed from the astonishing number of secrets held by the government and the growing ranks of secret-keepers given charge over them. The government secrecy industry speaks in a private language of codes and acronyms, and follows an arcane set of rules and customs designed to perpetuate itself, repel penetration, and deflect oversight. It justifies itself with the assertion that the American values worth preserving are often best sustained by subterfuge and deception. There are indications that this deep state is crumbling. Necessary secrets are often impossible to keep, while frivolous secrets are kept forever. The entire system has fallen prey to political manipulation, with leaks carefully timed to advance agendas, and over-classification given to indefensible government activities. Deep State, written by two of the country's most respected national security journalists, disassembles the secrecy apparatus of the United States and examines real-world trends that ought to trouble everyone from the most aggressive hawk to the fiercest civil libertarian. The book: - Provides the fullest account to date of the National Security Agency’s controversial surveillance program first spun up in the dark days after 9/11. - Examines President Obama's attempt to reconcile his instincts as a liberal with the realities of executive power, and his use of the state secrets doctrine. - Exposes how the public’s ubiquitous access to information has been the secrecy industry's toughest opponent to date, and provides a full account of how WikiLeaks and other “sunlight” organizations are changing the government's approach to handling sensitive information, for better and worse. - Explains how the increased exposure of secrets affects everything from Congressional budgets to Area 51, from SEAL Team Six and Delta Force to the FBI, CIA, and NSA. - Assesses whether the formal and informal mechanisms put in place to protect citizens from abuses by the American deep state work, and how they might be reformed. Deep State is based on the authors' insatiable curiosity for the ground truth and layered on a foundation of original and historical research as well as unprecedented access to lawmakers, intelligence agency heads, White House officials, and secret program managers. It draws on thousands of recently declassified documents and candid interviews with more than 100 military, industry, and government officials. By the bestselling authors of The Command: Deep Inside the President's Secret Army: Marc Ambinder, editor at large at The Week, contributing editor at GQ and the Atlantic, who has covered Washington for CBS News and ABC News; and D.B. Grady, a correspondent for the Atlantic, national security columnist for The Week, and former U.S. Army paratrooper and Afghanistan veteran.
The state secrets privilege is a judicially created evidentiary privilege that allows the gov¿t. to resist court-ordered disclosure of info. during litigation, if there is a reasonable danger that such disclosure would harm the nat. security of the U.S. Contents of this report: (1) U.S. v. Reynolds: Asserting the Privilege; Evaluating the Validity of the Privilege; Effect of a Valid Privilege; (2) Totten v. U.S.: Special Case of Nonjusticiable Contracts for Espionage; (3) Classified Info. Procedures Act and Secret Evidence in Criminal Litigation:Withholding Classified Info. During Discovery; Confrontation Clause and the Use of Secret Evidence at Trial; (4) Legislative Modification of the State Secrets Privilege: Foreign Intell. Surveillance Act; State Secrets Protection Act.
Introduction : the secret presidency -- The secret presidency in historical-theoretical perspective -- The classified president -- State secrets and executive power -- The shadow president : the attorney general and new anti-terror laws -- The president and national security surveillance -- The new executive privilege -- Conclusion : the secret presidency.
ÔThis is an important collection of scholarly essays that will illuminate positive legal developments and normative constitutionalist concerns in the expanding arena of secret government decisions. This book is indispensable reading for those concerned with constitutionalism, the rule of law and democracy as they bear on the tensions between secrecy and disclosure in government responses to terrorism.Õ Ð Vicki C. Jackson, Harvard University Law School, US ÔThis book contains the broadest and deepest analysis of the legal and policy issues that relate to secrecy and national security on one hand, and the imperatives of a functioning democracy on the other. The broadest because it brings to bear materials from many countries, the deepest because it brilliantly explores a core problem of constitutional government.Õ Ð Norman Dorsen, New York University, US and President, American Civil Liberties Union, 1976Ð1991 Virtually every nation has had to confront tensions between the rule-of-law demands for transparency and accountability and the need for confidentiality with respect to terrorism and national security. This book provides a global and comparative overview of the implications of governmental secrecy in a variety of contexts. Expert contributors from around the world discuss the dilemmas posed by the necessity for Ð and evils of Ð secrecy, and assess constitutional mechanisms for checking the abuse of secrecy by national and international institutions in the field of counter-terrorism. In recent years, nations have relied on secret evidence to detain suspected terrorists and freeze their assets, have barred lawsuits alleging human rights violations by invoking Ôstate secretsÕ, and have implemented secret surveillance and targeted killing programs. The book begins by addressing the issue of secrecy at the institutional level, examining the role of courts and legislatures in regulating the use of secrecy claims by the executive branch of government. From there, the focus shifts to the three most vital areas of anti-terrorism law: preventive detention, criminal trials and administrative measures (notably, targeted economic sanctions). The contributors explore how assertions of secrecy and national security in each of these areas affect the functioning of the legal system and the application of procedural justice and fairness. Students, professors and researchers interested in constitutional law, international law, comparative law and issues of terrorism and security will find this an invaluable addition to the literature. Judges, lawyers and policymakers will also find much of use in this critical volume.
Examines modern trends in intelligence oversight development and how these mechanisms bolster an internal security system, increasing the secrecy of the intelligence enterprise.

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