"The Mirzayanov case is an immediate legal litmus test of emerging Russian democracy. He is an individual in the true tradition of Andrei Sakharov, a man persecuted under the former regime for telling the truth, but now, rightfully, universally honored."--Dan Ellsberg, author.
Following the release of MI5 files into the British National Archives, the author re-examines a notorious case of espionage at the American Embassy in London during 1939-1940 when 'Top Secret' correspondence between Franklin Roosevelt and Winston Churchill was leaked. Their correspondence was potentially damaging to both men because Churchill had not stepped up as Prime Minister and the United States had not then entered the war. Moreover, Roosevelt was coming up for re-election in November 1940 with the pledge that 'I have said this before but I shall say it again and again and again; your boys are not going to be sent into any foreign wars'. Tyler Kent, a code and cipher clerk at the Embassy, would admit collecting Embassy documents that he considered 'interesting' and sharing these with Anna Wolkoff, a Russian-born dress designer, and Captain Archibald Ramsay, the Conservative MP for Peebles. Joseph P. Kennedy, the American Ambassador, waived Kent's diplomatic immunity and all three were arrested. Kent and Wolkoff were tried in secret in October 1940 when they were handed down sentences of 7 and 10 years; and Ramsay was interned without trial until September 1944. Two Canadian journalists who sensed a good story were also interned. There have been many colourful cover stories published of Kent and Wolkoff's activities over the years but only now has it been possible to publish The Full Story, which includes compelling evidence of Roosevelt's warlike intent, a MI5 sting operation, perjury and the manipulation of Court documents.
She's about to become a lot more than just an assignment to this undercover secret agent… don't miss this reader favorite from #1 New York Times bestselling author Linda Lael Miller! Cookbook author Holly Llewellyn is the last person who should be labeled an “enemy of the state”—or is she? After all, her brother is a missing traitor, and with her ties to the president, the Secret Service isn't taking chances. So they send in agent David Goddard, undercover. But after one glance, David knows Holly isn't just an “assignment”—she's a woman who'll change his life. But first, he'll have to keep her safe from the enemy that will remain hidden at all costs until they can strike… Originally published in 1985
Wo liegen die Wurzeln der syrischen Katastrophe? Das gängige Bild sieht die Schuld einseitig bei Assad und seinen Verbündeten, insbesondere Russland. Dass auch der Westen einen erheblichen Anteil an Mitschuld trägt, ist kaum zu hören oder zu lesen. Michael Lüders erzählt den fehlenden Teil der Geschichte, der alles in einem anderen Licht erscheinen lässt. Anhand von freigegebenen Geheimdienstdokumenten und geleakten Emails von Entscheidungsträgern zeigt er, wie und warum die USA und ihre Verbündeten seit Beginn der Revolte ausgerechnet Dschihadisten mit Waffen beliefern - in einem Umfang wie seit dem Ende des Vietnamkrieges nicht mehr. Dadurch haben sie die innersyrische Gewalt ebenso befeuert wie auch den Stellvertreterkrieg zwischen den USA und Russland. Eindringlich beschreibt Lüders, wie insbesondere Washington schon seit langem nur auf eine günstige Gelegenheit wartete, das Assad-Regime zu stürzen. Dabei behandelt er auch frühere amerikanische Putschversuche in Syrien in den 1940er und 1950er Jahren, die fehlschlugen und erklären, warum sich Damaskus der Sowjetunion zuwandte. Die Kehrseite dieser Politik des Regimewechsels erlebt gegenwärtig vor allem Europa: mit der Flüchtlingskrise und einer erhöhten Terrorgefahr durch radikale Islamisten.
Award-winning investigative journalist Heather Brooke exposes the shocking and farcical lack of transparency at all levels of government. At a time when the State knows more than ever about us, Brooke argues that without proper access to the information that citizens pay for, Britain can never be a true democracy. *SECRECY*: anonymous bureaucrats, clandestine courts, men in tights and the true cost of 'public' information. *PROPAGANDA*: spin, PR and bullshitting by numbers. The British government spent £38m more on advertising last year than their closest competitor, Proctor and Gamble - find out what they spent it on! *SURVEILLANCE*: discover the extent of Britain's network of databases spying on ordinary citizens, *EXPENSES*: read, for the first time, the exclusive and definitive account of Brooke's five-year campaign to have MPs' expenses revealed, which rocked the nation and transformed Britain's political landscape.
A shocking murder at the Palace of Westminster draws Edinburgh's toughest cop into a complex new case... Skinner is plunged into a web of politics and enemies in STATE SECRETS, the twenty-eighth mystery in Quintin Jardine's bestselling crime series. Not to be missed by readers of Ian Rankin and Peter May. Praise for Quintin Jardine's gritty novels: 'Well constructed, fast-paced...many an ingenious twist and turn' Observer Former Chief Constable Bob Skinner is long out of the police force but trouble has a habit of following him around. So it is that he finds himself in the Palace of Westminster as a shocking act befalls the nation. Hours before the Prime Minister is due to make a controversial statement, she is discovered in her office with a letter opener driven through her skull. Is the act political? Personal? Or even one of terror? Skinner is swiftly enlisted by the Security Service to lead the investigation. Reunited with Met Police Commander Neil McIlhenney, he has forty-eight hours to crack the case - before the press unleash their wrath. There are many in the tangled web of government with cause to act. But the outcome will be one that not even Skinner himself could predict...
The state secrets privilege is a judicially created evidentiary privilege that allows the gov¿t. to resist court-ordered disclosure of info. during litigation, if there is a reasonable danger that such disclosure would harm the national security of the U.S. The Classified Info. Procedures Act provides pretrial procedures that permit a trial judge to rule on questions of admissibility involving classified info. before introduction of the evidence in open court. Contents of this report: (1) U.S. v. Reynolds: The Seminal Case: Asserting the Privilege; (2) Totten v. U.S.: The Special Case of Nonjusticiable Contracts for Espionage; (3) The Classified Info. Procedures Act and Secret Evidence in Criminal Litigation; and (4) Legislative Modification of the State Secrets Privilege.
Examines modern trends in intelligence oversight development and how these mechanisms bolster an internal security system, increasing the secrecy of the intelligence enterprise.
At a critical crossroads in New Zealand history, VJM Publishing has released the second edition of New Zealand best seller State Secrets by author Ben Vidgen. Read retrospectively, the 1999 best seller is essential reading for anyone wanting to understand what is now happening in the country known as Aotearoa. State Secrets correctly forecast the emergence of major threats to New Zealand national security (and its status as a genuinely democratic state). Threats which come from the rise of multinational trade blocs intent on accessing New Zealand's considerable natural resources. The agents of these threats, Vidgen maintains, are supported by neoliberal political elements within and outside New Zealand's own Government, such as its media structure, quick to take advantage of the simultaneous rise of a highly dangerous violent criminal class within New Zealand. The 1999 book argues the rise of organised crime in New Zealand is nothing less than a second front in an economic war being deliberately waged on New Zealand sovereignty by those who seek to end New Zealand democratic traditions from the shadows. For example, State Secrets demonstrates how large scale money laundering and white collar tax evasion was rife long before New Zealand was named in the Panama Tax haven bank scandal more than 60,000 times in 2016. State Secrets argued, well ahead of the mainstream pundits, that New Zealand's role as the largest "washing machine" in the South Pacific was having an impact on the housing market and the New Zealand way of life. Viewed in hindsight, the analysis - written by a veteran New Zealand investigator, with a research background in academic political science and New Zealand military intelligence - was dead on the bulls-eye every time. State Secrets forecast the failure of the war on drugs, predicting a massive surge in the meth trade, financed by white collar businessmen, being simultaneously tied to the super escalated growth of American styled super gangs. A claim then considered unlikely but now indisputable for anyone who read the headlines today. State Secrets correctly assessed that the collateral damage of this 'evolution' of New Zealand organised crime would serve to make lower socio-economic communities dysfunctional and would disempower swathes of the wider population as its impact overwhelmed the capacity of our health, education, social services and correctional services - in the process conveniently enhancing the argument for privatisation. State Secrets identifies the enemy within: a neoliberal American and New Zealand Business Round Table alliance who today can be found to have dug their fingers deep into all sides of the New Zealand Parliament (and increasingly the state judiciary and security forces), the political spectrum, and even its underbelly. It is driven by the motives of those addicted to the lust for absolute power and maximum profit. Forces seduced, as State Secrets forecasts, pre 9/11, by the largely self-made (self-armed) bogey monster of terrorism. The enemy within chooses to ignore dealing with the real threats New Zealand faces by placing control on foreign investment and New Zealand, notoriously relaxing banking and company law. Instead it seeks to opportunistically erode New Zealand civil liberties and strengthen a transformative State: one full of secrets which has broken its covenant with the people, serving a corporate master at the expense of the rest of New Zealand.
'An appraisal of a compelling character who might, at the age of 69 in January 2017, be sworn in as the most powerful woman in the history of the world.' The Times, BOOK OF THE WEEK 'A revealing window into the le Carré-like layers of intrigue that develop when a celebrity politician who is married to another celebrity politician loses to yet another celebrity politician, and goes on to serve the politician who defeated her.' Washington Post 'Provides useful context and intelligent analysis . . . pumped full of colorful you-are-there details.' New York Times Combining deep reporting and West Wing-esque storytelling, HRC reveals the strategising, machinations and last minute decision-making that have accompanied one of the greatest political comebacks in history.
TEMPTED BY HIS TARGET Cookbook author Holly Llewellyn is the last person who should be labeled an “enemy of the state”—or is she? After all, her brother is a missing traitor, and with her ties to the president, the Secret Service isn’t taking chances. So they send in Agent David Goddard, undercover. After one glance, David knows Holly isn’t just an “assignment”—she’s a woman who’ll change his life. But couldn’t her blue eyes, blond hair and girl-next-door smile be the perfect cover…for espionage? Yet David can’t stop himself from loving the woman he was sent to destroy. But he’ll have to keep her safe from the enemy that will remain hidden until they can strike… FREE BONUS STORY INCLUDED IN THIS VOLUME! Tall, Dark…Westmoreland! by New York Times bestselling author Brenda Jackson When Olivia Jeffries meets a handsome stranger at a masquerade ball the attraction is electric. But when she discovers he is Reginald Westmoreland, her father’s most hated rival and political opponent, she vows to resist him. However, it seems Reggie has other plans in mind… Previously published.
Stored in Whitehall's archives are everything from blood-chilling warnings of imminent nuclear attack to comical details of daily life in the corridors of power. Concerned notes from ministers on the subject of the Heir to the Throne's potential brainwashing by Welsh terrorists are shelved alongside worries about housemaids 'on the wobble' at Chequers. Detailed and surprising plans for royal funerals sit beside reports on suspected spies in the showbiz world and bawdy poetry about the monkeys on the Rock of Gibraltar. And Mary Whitehouse's complaints about the sex education syllabus nestle next to thank-you notes from prisoner 13260/62, also known as Nelson Mandela. Adam Macqueen, author of the highly acclaimed bestseller Private Eye: The First 50 Years, has searched high and low to present us with some of the most unlikely revelations since the Official secrets act was inaugurated one hundred years ago. Not only about Mrs Thatcher's ironing board, but Ted Heath's car, Harold Macmillan's bedroom carpet, Imelda Marcos and her son Bong Bong's trip to Buckingham Palace and President Eisenhower's particular problem with Winston Churchill's trousers.
There is something very rewarding about stumbling on a secret - and even better if it reveals the cunning, humanity or plain eccentricity of those in power. Here the "National Archives" takes a glimpse behind the scenes of the twentieth century, presenting 80 stories of the 'news behind the news' on subjects from world war to political scandal to the royal teabags. This thought-provoking collection paints a rich portrait of the British ntional character as ti responded to a turbulent century, recalling some familiar institutions like Dad's Army and James Bond shedding new light on events we all think we remember.
In this book, originally published in 1972, Leon de Poncins presents shocking evidence of the Zionist grip on the governments of both America and Britain throughout the twentieth century. These facts have been thoroughly suppressed in mainstream books of History, though that is unsurprising in an age where Truth is to be found in the shadows."
Two reader-favorite stories by two "New York Times"-bestselling authors are collected. This volume contains Miller's "State Secrets" and "Tall, DarkEWestmoreland!" by Jackson. Original.inal.
Secrets and Leaks examines the complex relationships among executive power, national security, and secrecy. State secrecy is vital for national security, but it can also be used to conceal wrongdoing. How then can we ensure that this power is used responsibly? Typically, the onus is put on lawmakers and judges, who are expected to oversee the executive. Yet because these actors lack access to the relevant information and the ability to determine the harm likely to be caused by its disclosure, they often defer to the executive's claims about the need for secrecy. As a result, potential abuses are more often exposed by unauthorized disclosures published in the press. But should such disclosures, which violate the law, be condoned? Drawing on several cases, Rahul Sagar argues that though whistleblowing can be morally justified, the fear of retaliation usually prompts officials to act anonymously--that is, to "leak" information. As a result, it becomes difficult for the public to discern when an unauthorized disclosure is intended to further partisan interests. Because such disclosures are the only credible means of checking the executive, Sagar writes, they must be tolerated, and, at times, even celebrated. However, the public should treat such disclosures skeptically and subject irresponsible journalism to concerted criticism.

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