Pharmaceutical Statistics is a new publication on basic statistics, specifically written for pharmacy students. It contains chapters on basic concepts such as types of data, graphical representation of data, distribution and standard deviation. More advanced, frequently used, statistical techniques such as ANOVA and the chi-squared test are also discussed using pharmaceutical examples. Pharmaceutical Statistics is essential reading for all pharmacy students and will also be of interest to those working in the pharmaceutical industry.
Jankowicz's approach is one of practical relevance and pragmatism supported by theory. Most business students will not become business researchers but need to know how to tackle a project.
A compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of American education from kindergarten through graduate school. Includes data from both governmental & private sources. Contains information on a variety of subjects, including the number of schools & colleges, teachers, enrollments, graduates, educational attainment, finances, federal funds for education, employment & income of recent graduates, libraries, & international education. Also, information on population trends, attitudes, characteristics, use of telecommunications technologies in public schools, etc.
Today's workplace is a dynamic, ever-changing environment. Job security is a thing of the past, layoffs are common, and people change jobs and careers frequently. Students need to be prepared to adapt to the unexpected twists and turns they may face. CREATING CAREER SUCCESS helps students develop a self-directed, proactive, flexible plan to launch and manage their careers over the years to come, using the latest technological resources and job search strategies. Through a process of self-assessment, career exploration, and self-promotion students discover how to connect their skills, interests and values to a variety of possible careers, build relationships, and present themselves in the best possible light to potential employers. Most importantly, students are encouraged to keep their minds and options open, and to engage themselves fully in the career development process. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.
For over 50 years, students and their parents have relied on this handbook for complete facts about colleges throughout the country. The only one-volume guide to all accredited colleges, both two- and four-year schools, the guide provides up-to-date information on admission policies, acceptance rates, financial aid, campus life, majors, and more.
This book shows how Microsoft Excel is able to teach human resource management statistics effectively. Similar to the previously published Excel 2010 for Human Resource Management Statistics, it is a step-by-step exercise-driven guide for students and practitioners who need to master Excel to solve practical human resource management problems. If understanding statistics isn’t your strongest suit, you are not especially mathematically-inclined, or if you are wary of computers, this is the right book for you. Excel, a widely available computer program for students and managers, is also an effective teaching and learning tool for quantitative analyses in human resource management courses. Its powerful computational ability and graphical functions make learning statistics much easier than in years past. Excel 2013 for Human Resource Management Statistics: A Guide to Solving Practical Problems is the next book to capitalize on these improvements by teaching students and managers how to apply Excel to statistical techniques necessary in their courses and work. Each chapter explains statistical formulas and directs the reader to use Excel commands to solve specific, easy-to-understand human resource management problems. Practice problems are provided at the end of each chapter with their solutions in an Appendix. Separately, there is a full Practice Test (with answers in an Appendix) that allows readers to test what they have learned.
Prospect Theory: For Risk and Ambiguity, provides a comprehensive and accessible textbook treatment of the way decisions are made both when we have the statistical probabilities associated with uncertain future events (risk) and when we lack them (ambiguity). The book presents models, primarily prospect theory, that are both tractable and psychologically realistic. A method of presentation is chosen that makes the empirical meaning of each theoretical model completely transparent. Prospect theory has many applications in a wide variety of disciplines. The material in the book has been carefully organized to allow readers to select pathways through the book relevant to their own interests. With numerous exercises and worked examples, the book is ideally suited to the needs of students taking courses in decision theory in economics, mathematics, finance, psychology, management science, health, computer science, Bayesian statistics, and engineering.
This text is a step-by-step guide for students taking a first course in statistics for social work and for social work managers and practitioners who want to learn how to use Excel to solve practical statistics problems in in the workplace, whether or not they have taken a course in statistics. There is no other text for a first course in social work statistics that teaches students, step-by-step, how to use Excel to solve interesting social work statistics problems. Excel 2016 for Social Work Statistics explains statistical formulas and offers practical examples for how students can solve real-world social work statistics problems. This book leaves detailed explanations of statistical theory to other statistics textbooks and focuses entirely on practical, real-world problem solving. Each chapter briefly explains a topic and then demonstrates how to use Excel commands and formulas to solve specific social work statistics problems. This book gives practice in using Excel in two different ways: (1) writing formulas (e.g., confidence interval about the mean, one-group t-test, two-group t-test, correlation) and (2) using Excel’s drop-down formula menus so as not to have to write formulas (e.g., simple linear regression, multiple correlation and multiple regression, and one-way ANOVA). Three practice problems are provided at the end of each chapter, along with their solutions in an Appendix. An additional Practice Test allows readers to test their understanding of each chapter by attempting to solve a specific practical social work statistics problem using Excel; the solution to each of these problems is also given in an Appendix.

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