The University of Cambridge Anthologies of Poetry and Stories. Stories of Ourselves is a set text for the Cambridge Literature in English courses at IGCSE, O Level, AS and A Level. The anthology contains stories by writers from many different countries and cultures.
This series contains poetry and prose anthologies composed of writers from across the English-speaking world. Stories of Ourselves Volume 2 is a set text for Cambridge IGCSE®, O Level and International AS & A Level Literature in English courses. The anthology contains short stories written in English by authors from many different countries and cultures, including Charles Dickens, Virginia Woolf, Christina Rossetti, Janet Frame, Jhumpa Lahiri, Romesh Gunesekera, Segun Afolabi, Margaret Atwood and many others. Classic writers appear alongside new voices from around the world in a stimulating collection with broad appeal.
This series contains poetry and prose anthologies composed of writers from across the English-speaking world. Parts of Stories of Ourselves Volume 1 are set for study in Cambridge IGCSE®, O Level and International AS & A Level Literature in English courses. Each short story in this collection has its own unique voice and point of view. They may differ in form, genre, style, tone and origin, but all have been chosen because of their wide appeal. Written in English by authors from different countries and cultures, the anthology includes works by Charles Dickens, H.G. Wells, Virginia Woolf, Graham Greene, V.S. Naipaul, R.K Narayan, Janet Frame, Raymond Carver, Jhumpa Lahiri, Annie Proulx and many others.
First published in 2001. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
In Stories of Our Lives Frank de Caro demonstrates the value of personal narratives in enlightening our lives and our world. We all live with legends, family sagas, and anecdotes that shape our selves and give meaning to our recollections. Featuring an array of colorful stories from de Caro’s personal life and years of field research as a folklorist, the book is part memoir and part exploration of how the stories we tell, listen to, and learn play an integral role in shaping our sense of self. De Caro’s narrative includes stories within the story: among them a near-mythic capture of his golden-haired grandmother by Plains Indians, a quintessential Italian rags-to-riches grandfather, and his own experiences growing up in culturally rich 1950s New York City, living in India amid the fading glories of a former princely state, conducting field research on Day of the Dead altars in Mexico, and coming home to a battered New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. Stories of Our Lives shows that our lives are interesting, and that the stories we tell—however particular to our own circumstances or trivial they may seem to others—reveal something about ourselves, our societies, our cultures, and our larger human existence.
Faces of Compassion introduces us to enlightened beings, the bodhisattvas of Buddhist lore. They're not otherworldly gods with superhuman qualities but shining examples of our own highest potential. Archetypes of wisdom and compassion, the bodhisattvas of Buddhism are powerful and compelling images of awakening. Scholar and Zen teacher Taigen Dan Leighton engagingly explores the imagery and lore of the seven most important of these archetypal figures, bringing them alive as psychological and spiritual wellsprings. Emphasizing the universality of spiritual ideas, Leighton finds aspects of bodhisattvas expressed in a variety of familiar modern personages - from Muhammad Ali to Mahatma Gandhi, from Bob Dylan to Henry Thoreau, and from Gertrude Stein to Mother Teresa. This edition contains a revised and expanded introduction that frames the book as a exciting and broad-scoped view of Mahayana Buddhism. It's updated throughout to make it of more use to scholars and a perfect companion to survey courses of world religions or a 200-level course on Buddhism.
Interest in the Man in Black has grown since his death in 2003, with increased record sales, cover videos by groups like Nine Inch Nails, and the 2006 biopic Walk the Line cementing his fame. This book honors Cash by examining the many philosophical issues and concepts within his music. From the gender confusion of “A Boy Named Sue” to the ethics of "shooting a man just to watch him die,” philosophers who are fans of Johnny Cash explore the meaning and continuing importance of his work and legacy.
Teach students about Hmong culture, build appreciation of diversity, and extend learning across the curriculum with engaging activities based on Hmong folktales and traditions. Themes covered include farming, storytelling, folk arts, and customs. Students will enjoy learning about Hmong musical instruments, the beautiful Pa Ndau story cloths, and more. A wonderful companion to Folk Stories of the Hmong.
This resource book reflects the way that migration affects personal identity and offers educators and students the resources to examine this migration through methods of storytelling. It reveals experiences of immigrants from the individual to the collective through memoirs, journalistic accounts, and interviews. These experiences reflect a recent and global phenomenon where identity and citizenship are challenged by the greater blurring of national boundaries. By exploring the stories of young migrants and their changing communities, "Stories" takes into consideration the fluidity of identity. A glossary is included. Individual sections contain footnotes.
Diversity at Work: The Practice of Inclusion How can organizations, their leaders, and their people benefit from diversity? The answer, according to this cutting-edge book, is the practice of inclusion. Diversity at Work: The Practice of Inclusion (a volume in SIOP's Professional Practice Series) presents detailed solutions for the challenge of inclusion—how to fully connect with, engage, and empower people across all types of differences. Its editors and chapter authors—all topic experts ranging from internal and external change agents to academics—effectively translate theories and research on diversity into the applied practice of inclusion. Readers will learn about the critical issues involved in framing, designing, and implementing inclusion initiatives in organizations and supporting individuals to develop competencies for inclusion. The authors' diverse voices combine to provide an innovative and expansive model of the practice of inclusion and to address its key aspects at the individual, group, and organizational levels. The book, designed to be a hands-on resource, provides case studies and illustrations to show how diversity and inclusion operate in a variety of settings, effectively highlighting the practices needed to benefit from diversity. This comprehensive handbook: Explains how to conceptualize, operationalize, and implement inclusion in organizations. Connects inclusion to multiple dimensions of diversity (including gender, race, ethnicity, nationality, social class, religion, profession, and many others) in integrative ways, incorporating specific and relevant examples. Includes models, illustrations, and cases showing how to apply the principles and practices of inclusion. Addresses international and multicultural perspectives throughout, including many examples. Provides practitioners with key perspectives and tools for thinking about and fostering inclusion in a variety of organizational contexts. Provides HR professionals, industrial-organizational psychologists, D&I practitioners, and those in related fields—as well as anyone interested in enhancing the workplace—with a one-stop resource on the latest knowledge regarding diversity and the practice of inclusion in organizations. This vital resource offers a clear understanding of and a way to navigate the challenges of creating and sustaining inclusion initiatives that truly work. A division of the American Psychological Association and established in 1945, the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (SIOP) is the premier association for professionals charged with enhancing human well-being and performance in organizational and work settings. SIOP has more than 7,000 members.
An examination of social memory developed within communities from the perspective of anthropology. Many case studies from around the world.
The evocation of narrative as a way to understand the content of consciousness, including memory, autobiography, self, and imagination, has sparked truly interdisciplinary work among psychologists, philosophers, and literary critics. Even neuroscientists have taken an interest in the stories people create to understand themselves, their past, and the world around them. The research presented in this volume should appeal to researchers enmeshed in these problems, as well as the general reader with an interest in the philosophical problem of what consciousness is and how it functions in the everyday world.
Giovannino Guareschi (1908-1968) was an Italian journalist, humorist, and cartoonist best known for his short stories based on the fictional Catholic priest Don Camillo. In this study, Alan R. Perry explores the Don Camillo stories from the perspective of Christian hermeneutics, a unique approach and the best critical key to unlocking the richness of both the author and his tales. The stories of Don Camillo, the cantankerous but beloved priest, and his sidekick, Communist mayor Peppone, continue to entertain viewers and readers. Their Cold War adventures, mishaps, arguments, and reconciliations have a timeless quality, and their actions reflect endearing values that prevail even today. The stories delight, to be sure, but the best of them also force us to stop and think about how Guareschi so powerfully conveyed the Christian message of faith, hope, and love. To appreciate the true genius of Guareschi, Perry argues that we must delve deeper into the latent spiritual meaning that many of his stories contain. In reflecting popular understandings of the faith, the Don Camillo tales allow us to appreciate a sacred awareness of the world, an understanding communicated through objects, gestures, expressions, and actual religious rites. The first full-length scholarly examination of the Don Camillo stories to appear, this book offers a solid appreciation of Italian cultural values and discusses the ways in which those values were contested in the first decades of the Cold War.
‘In-between Things: A book of poetry, stories of identity, and interpreting society’ is an anthology of poems, creative non-fiction pieces, essays and social commentary written by the young writer and aspiring scholar/activist Teju Adisa-Farrar. This book maps the progress of her ideas throughout her last year of high school and first few years of college. Starting with pieces of her life and memories from childhood, the book starts off as a creative biography. As the book continues on it develops into an array of writings on the author’s feelings about love, social issues, and histories. The author shares her intimate thoughts along side old, new, and developing beliefs and theories about the society she lives in and the world we are all apart of. While the author does not hold all these ideas as true anymore she wanted to map out and explore how growth is a creative process that does not mean we are becoming someone different, rather that we are learning more about the essence we were always meant to grow into. In this book she uses various types of written form to understand her own identity as it relates to her own stories and her expanding understanding of the world. This anthology combines identity and interpretation in a way that helps us discover the stories in Adisa-Farrar’s mind. The free-flowing nature of the book allows each piece to be new and of it’s own, but add to a larger story of the world as seen through the eyes of a young adult who’s passion is endless and boundless.
The University of Cambridge Anthologies of Poetry and Stories.
There is more to the tradition of yoga than toning and strengthening. At the root, there is a vast and intriguing philosophy that teaches the ethics of nonviolence, patience, honesty, and respect. Michael Stone provides an in-depth explanation of ancient Indian yogic philosophy along with teachings on how to bring our understanding of yoga theory to deeper levels through our practice on the mat—and through our relationships with others.
»Hattest du als Kind auch diesen Moment, in dem dir plötzlich klar wurde, dass deine Familie verrückt ist?« Es war einmal ein Haus mit einem Garten, in dem wohnten ein Apfelbaum, ein Bach und ein kleine Katze mit mondgelben Augen. Hier wachsen drei Kinder auf: Rosemary, ihre ungestüme Schwester Fern und ihr großer Bruder Lowell. Sie könnten eine ganz normale Familie sein. Wäre ihr Vater nicht Wissenschaftler, und wäre Fern nicht ein ganz besonderes kleines Mädchen, das Wachsmalstifte verspeist, den perfekten Rückwärtssalto beherrscht und lacht wie eine Säge. Jahre nach Ferns Verschwinden erzählt Rosemary nun deren Geschichte. Denn erzählen war das Einzige, was Fern nie konnte. »Die wundersame Reise ins Herz einer Familie. Am Ende bricht das Buch dem Leser nicht einfach das Herz – es nimmt sein Herz und gibt es nicht mehr zurück.« Dan Chaon »Mein Lieblingsbuch des Jahres.« Elizabeth George
The best of the best from one of the most effective preachers in the English-speaking world

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