An accessible, student-friendly handbook that covers all of the essential study and organisational skills that will ensure any student studying a university course whilst continuing to work can get the most out of their course and improve their employability .
Uses the latest information on cognition, memory, and educational sociology to outline a program of time management, note-taking, test preparation, and other skills for student success.
THE ORIGINAL AND BEST – BY THE MILLION COPY BESTSELLING AUTHOR If you are serious about succeeding with your studies, The Study Skills Handbook is for you! Stella Cottrell has helped hundreds of thousands of students to make learning easier, faster and more enjoyable. Recognising that we all have our own unique formula for success, her tried and trusted approach allows you to find the key to unlock your potential and develop the skills you need to improve your grades, build your confidence and plan for the future you want. This fully revised fourth edition features: • Chapters on all the core study skills – including research, critical thinking, MA26 writing, revision, team work and more • E-learning coverage throughout • Illustrations and a strong visual design – acting as memory joggers, reinforcing learning and making the book more accessible, fun and engaging • Lots of new material including brand new chapters on student success and time management No matter whether you have just left school or MA26, whether you are a mature, part-time or international student, The Study Skills Handbook is your passport to success.
Successful study skills, employability skills and career development. This helps student to develop their transferable skills as part of their studies. It has lots of exercises and ideas to help students become better at planning their skills and career development. It is part of the personal development planning (PDP) that leads to success.
Many students on Health and Social Care Foundation Degree and Access courses struggle with the academic expectations required of them at this level. This book is written to support such students in adapting to self-directed study, understand the assessment process and how they can make the most of their learning opportunities. The authors also cover practicalities such as avoiding plagiarism, using their studies to become a reflective practitioner, and understanding the benefit of research and critical thinking. More than a generic study guide, this book is practice-based and will be of great benefit to health and social care students. SAGE Study Skills are essential study guides for students of all levels. From how to write great essays and succeeding at university, to writing your undergraduate dissertation and doing postgraduate research, SAGE Study Skills help you get the best from your time at university.
A Guide to Study Skills and Careers in Criminal Justice and Public Security is the ultimate how-to resource for success in the study of criminal justice. Renowned author Frank Schmalleger, who has over 40 years of field experience, has teamed up with researcher and educator Catherine D. Marcum to introduce students to the field of criminal justice, break down its many components, and describe a variety of employment opportunities available to criminal justice graduates. Students will learn how to effectively approach the study of criminal justice; communicate successfully with professors, peers, and potential employers; choose classes that will assist with career goals; develop good study habits and critical thinking skills; and write effectively in criminal justice. Additionally, as their academic careers advance, students will gain insights into how to best prepare for successful careers.
Discusses the best methods of learning, describing how rereading and rote repetition are counterproductive and how such techniques as self-testing, spaced retrieval, and finding additional layers of information in new material can enhance learning.
This concise text which contextualises study skills within the specific discipline of management helps students to understand the structure and nature of management, academic practices and their relevance to the workplace, and also the importance of reflective practice.
In spite of soaring tuition costs, more and more students go to college every year. A bachelor’s degree is now required for entry into a growing number of professions. And some parents begin planning for the expense of sending their kids to college when they’re born. Almost everyone strives to go, but almost no one asks the fundamental question posed by Academically Adrift: are undergraduates really learning anything once they get there? For a large proportion of students, Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa’s answer to that question is a definitive no. Their extensive research draws on survey responses, transcript data, and, for the first time, the state-of-the-art Collegiate Learning Assessment, a standardized test administered to students in their first semester and then again at the end of their second year. According to their analysis of more than 2,300 undergraduates at twenty-four institutions, 45 percent of these students demonstrate no significant improvement in a range of skills—including critical thinking, complex reasoning, and writing—during their first two years of college. As troubling as their findings are, Arum and Roksa argue that for many faculty and administrators they will come as no surprise—instead, they are the expected result of a student body distracted by socializing or working and an institutional culture that puts undergraduate learning close to the bottom of the priority list. Academically Adrift holds sobering lessons for students, faculty, administrators, policy makers, and parents—all of whom are implicated in promoting or at least ignoring contemporary campus culture. Higher education faces crises on a number of fronts, but Arum and Roksa’s report that colleges are failing at their most basic mission will demand the attention of us all.
How appropriate for today and for the future are the policies and practices of higher education that largely assume a norm of traditional-age students with minimal on-campus, or no, work commitments? Despite the fact that work is a fundamental part of life for nearly half of all undergraduate students – with a substantial number of “traditional” dependent undergraduates in employment, and working independent undergraduates averaging 34.5 hours per week – little attention has been given to how working influences the integration and engagement experiences of students who work, especially those who work full-time, or how the benefits and costs of working differ between traditional age-students and adult students. The high, and increasing, prevalence and intensity of working among both dependent and independent students raises a number of important questions for public policymakers, college administrators, faculty, academic advisors, student services and financial aid staff, and institutional and educational researchers, including: Why do so many college students work so many hours? What are the characteristics of undergraduates who work? What are the implications of working for students’ educational experiences and outcomes? And, how can public and institutional policymakers promote the educational success of undergraduate students who work? This book offers the most complete and comprehensive conceptualization of the “working college student” available. It provides a multi-faceted picture of the characteristics, experiences, and challenges of working college students and a more complete understanding of the heterogeneity underlying the label “undergraduates who work” and the implications of working for undergraduate students’ educational experiences and outcomes. The volume stresses the importance of recognizing the value and contribution of adult learners to higher education, and takes issue with the appropriateness of the term “non-traditional” itself, both because of the prevalence of this group, and because it allows higher education institutions to avoid considering changes that will meet the needs of this population, including changes in course offerings, course scheduling, financial aid, and pedagogy.
What Every Student Should Know About Study Skills teaches students the study skills they need to master for college success. The strategy-development activities throughout the book allow student to assess their learning styles, improve time management and stress management, and become active learners. The What Every Student Should Know About... series is a collection of guide books designed to help students with specific topics that are important in a number of different college courses. Instructors can package any one of these booklets with their Allyn & Bacon/Longman textbook for no additional charge, or the booklets can be purchased separately. Consult your local Allyn & Bacon/Longman representative for more details.
Study Skills and Test-Taking Strategies for Medical Students: Find and Use Your Personal Learning Style provides techniques that identify and apply the medical student's personal learning-style to specific study skills and exam-taking strategies so that understanding, analysis, synthesis, and recall of information occur in a time-efficient manner. This volume in the Oklahoma Notes Series is written for talented medical students who were excellent scholars in undergraduate school but find themselves overwhelmed with the information explosion and time constraints of medical school. Topics covered include learning styles, time management and memory, taking notes, problem-solving, preparing for national board examinations, stress management, test-taking discrimination skills and organizing and working in a study group. This book will also be useful to undergraduates preparing for their MCAT exam, as well as other students in pressured courses of study.
Take the stress out of studying with this students’ guide to time management and organization from the bestselling How to Study series. In this essential guide, education expert Ron Fry helps students of all ages develop organizational techniques, streamline study time, and avoid the stress of disorderly spaces and rushed schedules. Get Organized also provides strategies for prioritizing tasks, avoiding time-trap activities and procrastination, and anticipating opportunities. You’ll learn how to make your study time efficient and effective by using simple time-management tips that are practical, flexible, and adaptable for your personal goals. Get Organized features: Updated information on electronic and online planning tools Tips for creating ideal study environments Proven techniques for establishing effective lifelong organizational habits Advice on making monthly and daily calendars work for you Ideas for creating optimal project boards and to-do lists Prepare. Prioritize. Plan. Whatever your age, you can benefit from the smart strategies in Get Organized.
High school students, whether preparing for college or career, need to learn greater independence and efficiency in their learning. Rather than simply teach them how to study, the hm Program emphasizes the need to understand their learning style, empowering them to adapt to new situations throughout their lives. They will learn how to improve their memory, glean more from discussions, prepare for exams, expand their vocabulary, and more.
A New Framework for Assessment, the first volume in the PISA series, provides the conceptual framework on which the PISA 2000 assessment is based.
By mastering the seven basic elements of complete study skills included in this book, it's possible to tap into hidden potential for maximum performance and increased learning power.
The Business Student’s Handbook integrates study skills, interpersonal skills and work skills to help students gain better marks in their study and to transfer those skills for success in the workplace. The book covers a broad range of topics including: essential skills such as essay writing, exam technique and managing one’s studies, interpersonal skills such as working in teams, communicating and presenting, and work skills such as exploring problems, managing projects and improving creativity.
This book provides a view into the groundbreaking application of ethnographic tools and techniques to the understanding of undergraduate students and their use of information. The publication describes findings of the work at the University of Rochester River Campus Libraries and provides insight into how academic librarians might use these techniques on their own campuses.
The new edition of this popular book combines the theory and practice of academic writing for nursing and midwifery students. Developing understanding of the basics of academic writing and cognitive processes such as reflection and critical thinking, this text is an invaluable resource for learners at all levels.

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