Presents a comparative analysis as a means to explain and describe organizational heterogeneity, at varying levels and contexts. This title consists of two sections: an introductory essay section and a section that focuses on specific theoretical, methodological and empirical topics.
Some 20 years after the emergence of configurational theory as a key perspective in organization studies in the 1990s, this approach has yet to deliver on its promise. While we know that configurations – the relative arrangement of parts and elements - matters, empirical research on configurations is just beginning to deliver on its promise. The starting point of the edited volume is the revival and evolution of a configurational perspective on organizations, both in terms of the use of configurational set-theoretic methods such as Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) and in terms of configurational theorizing that has emerged from the use of such methods. The volume brings together a variety of scholars working with set theoretic configurational methods to apply these methods to a range of prominent fields in organization studies, ranging from organizational design, international business, and human resource practices to networks and the management of information systems. Each author or group of authors pays specific attention to assessing the potential of set-theoretical configurational methods for organization studies. Two extensive introductory chapters discuss the state of the art with regard to different set-theoretic (fuzzy set and crisp set) methods. In three response pieces leading scholars offer a reflection on the potential of set-theoretic methods for organizational analysis. The volume aims to provide both inspiration and practical advice on how to conduct configurational analysis. The chapters illustrate the breadth of organizational fields and the growing range of topics for which the configurational perspective can provides insights. This volume vividly illustrates that the configurational approach is maturing. It aims to inspire organizational scholars to develop theories and methods that truly consider organizations as clusters of interconnected structures and practices that have to be studied as configurations.
Despite the profound influence that religious organizations exert, religion occupies a curiously marginal place in organization theory. This volume aims to make available in one place existing knowledge on religion and organizations, encouraging more organization theorists to include religion as part of their research activities and agenda.
The sixth edition of Organisational Behaviour inherits the rich legacy of the previous editions that have proved to be a boon for the seekers looking to enhance their knowledge and be a step ahead of their peers. The insightful text, examples that are deeply embedded in reality, and unique pedagogical features, combined with the vast experience of its authors in the field of management brings forth a product that stands tall in the market. Contemporary and Informed This learning resource presents the new trends, contemporary theories and research that encourages the reader to delve deeper in the content to better understand the current scenario in the discipline. The Asia-pacific focused approach is evident in all the latest and updated content presented in this edition. Relevant and Engaging In our quest to offer most relevant study matter, it is made sure that we know the pulse of the market. To this reason, this edition offers updated case studies accompanying each chapter and presence of OB Insight and OB Ethics makes sure that students get a unique viewpoint to the world of management. The feature, OB by the Numbers that presents survey results of the topics discussed, gives a unique flavour to each chapter. Inclusion of various chapter-end practice modules will further feed and engage the curious minds. Enables Effective Learning This book and its vast array of digital resources, offer incomparable learning opportunity to the students and academics alike. One stands to gain from the up-to-date content presented in a clear, concise, and lucid manner. Mc-Graw Hill’s breakthrough digital platforms and the knowledge they offer, make this product a must buy and a must read.
In Leadership in a Slum Johnson looks at leadership in the Thai social context from a different angle than traditional studies that measure well-educated Thais on leadership scales derived in the West. Seeking a cultural account of social influence processes he turns to those who have been left behind in the race to participate in a globalizing world, the urban poor. Using both systematic data collection and participant observation he develops a culturally preferred model as well as a set of models based in Thai concepts that reflect on-the-ground realities. Johnson also examines the community-state relationship and finds that in the face of state power that brings both development and the forces of eviction, the community and its leaders are not passive in this relationship but modify, reject, or resist state views in their various forms. He concludes by looking at the implications of his anthropological approach for those who are involved in leadership training in Thai settings and beyond. This work challenges the dominance of the patron-client rubric for understanding all forms of Thai leadership and offers an alternative view for understanding leadership rooted in local social systems to approaches that assume the universal applicability of leadership research findings across all cultural settings.
Much of everyday work is done through talk between practitioner and client. Conversation Analysis is the close inspection of people's use of language in interaction. The work reported in this collection shows how CA can be used to identify, and improve, communicative practices at work.
Despite real progress, women remain rare enough in elite positions of power that their presence still evokes a sense of wonder. In Through the Labyrinth, Alice Eagly and Linda Carli examine why women's paths to power remain difficult to traverse. First, Eagly and Carli prove that the glass ceiling is no longer a useful metaphor and offer seven reasons why. They propose the labyrinth as a better image and explain how to navigate through it. This important and practical book addresses such critical questions as: How far have women actually come as leaders? Do stereotypes and prejudices still limit women's opportunities? Do people resist women's leadership more than men's? And, do organisations create obstacles to women who would be leaders?This book's rich analysis is founded on scientific research from psychology, economics, sociology, political science, and management. The authors ground their conclusions in that research and invoke a wealth of engaging anecdotes and personal accounts to illustrate the practical principles that emerge. With excellent leadership in short supply, no group, organisation, or nation can afford to restrict women's access to leadership roles. This book evaluates whether such restrictions are present and, when they are, what we can do to eliminate them.
Focuses both on specific regional organizations like ASEAN, The Asian Development Bank and APEC, as well as on key institutions such as East Asian legal systems, the media, organized labour, Asian business systems, and the developmental state.
This report is based on an exhaustive review of the published literature on the definitions, measurements, epidemiology, economics and interventions applied to nine chronic conditions and risk factors.
This book is part of a quest for a general theory of organizations valid in all cultures. Central to Frank Salter's investigation is the question of social power: why people obey their superiors. His approach is to locate the nature of organizational power in the behavioral details of hierarchical interactions in the institutional settings in which they occur. Salter begins by noting the extensive research that points to hierarchy as being a necessary component of organization and proceeds to an analysis rendered in universals of primary emotions and behaviors of dominance and affiliation. The first five chapters are theoretical, the last seven empirical. He reviews the social science literature showing the place of ethological methods and concepts, then aspects of the evolution and physiology of dominance and affiliation. Salter then introduces the emotional underpinnings of dominance and affiliation, and applies these concepts in a summary of the literature on interpersonal signaling. He describes the methods used, drawing parallels with classical ethology, anthropology, and sociology. The empirical section begins with a short chapter examining the simple commands given in a military parade. Chapter 7 analyses nightclub doormen's use of dominance in dealing with troublesome patrons. Chapter 8 describes the giving and receiving of commands in artistic rehearsals, and finds generally soft, appeased commands. Chapters 9 and 10 analyze courts and meetings respectively, finding both blunt and softened commands. Chapter 11 reports preliminary observations of command in general government bureaucracy, a setting which combines many organizational techniques in a highly articulated infrastructure. The concluding chapter summarizes the data and adopts a comparative method in searching for relationships between structural variables of institutional dominance and behavioral variables of command aggression, subordinate submission and resistance, and task characteristics. Provocative and well written, Emotions in Command will appeal to students and researchers in sociology, anthropology, and social and organizational-industrial psychology. Frank Kemp Salter is an Australian political scientist who has been a researcher with the Max Planck Society, Andechs, Germany since 1991 and is author of On Genetic Interests which is published by Transaction.
Causal explanations are essential for theory building. In focusing on causal mechanisms rather than descriptive effects, the goal of this volume is to increase our theoretical understanding of the way gender operates in interaction. Theoretical analyses of gender's effects in interaction, in turn, are necessary to understand how such effects might be implicated with individual-level and social structural-level processes in the larger system of gender inequality. Despite other differences, the contributors to this book all take what might be loosely called a "microstructural" approach to gender and interaction. All agree that individuals come to interaction with certain common, socially created beliefs, cultural meanings, experiences, and social rules. These include stereotypes about gendered activities and skills, beliefs about the status value of gender, rules for interacting in certain settings, and so on. However, as individuals apply these beliefs and rules to the specific contingent events of interaction, they combine and reshape their implications in distinctive ways that are particular to the encounter. As a result, individuals actively construct their social relations in the encounter through their interaction. The patterns of relations that develop are not completely determined or scripted in advance by the beliefs and rules of the larger society. Consequently, there is a reciprocal causal relationship between constructed patterns of interaction and larger social structural forms. The constructed patterns of social relations among a set of interactants can be thought of as micro-level social structures or, more simply, "microstructures.
Sociology & anthropology.
Max Weber's Economy and Society is the greatest sociological treatise written in this century. Published posthumously in Germany in the early 1920's, it has become a constitutive part of the modern sociological imagination. Economy and Society was the first strictly empirical comparison of social structures and normative orders in world-historical depth, containing the famous chapters on social action, religion, law, bureaucracy, charisma, the city, and the political community with its dimensions of class, status and power. Economy and Status is Weber's only major treatise for an educated general public. It was meant to be a broad introduction, but in its own way it is the most demanding textbook yet written by a sociologist. The precision of its definitions, the complexity of its typologies and the wealth of its historical content make the work a continuos challenge at several levels of comprehension: for the advanced undergraduate who gropes for his sense of society, for the graduate student who must develop his own analytical skills, and for the scholar who must match wits with Weber. When the long-awaited first complete English edition of Economy and Society was published in 1968, Arthur Stinchcombe wrote in the American Journal of Sociology: "My answer to the question of whether people should still start their sociological intellectual biographies with Economy and Society is yes." Reinhard Bendix noted in the American Sociological Review that the "publication of a compete English edition of Weber's most systematic work [represents] the culmination of a cultural transmission to the American setting...It will be a study-guide and compendium for years to come for all those interested in historical sociology and comparative study." In a lengthy introduction, Guenther Roth traces the intellectual prehistory of Economy and Society, the gradual emergence of its dominant themes and the nature of its internal logic. Mr. Roth is a Professor of Sociology at Columbia University. Mr. Wittich heads an economic research group at the United Nations.
The book introduces a unique and innovative perspective for the study of international business networking. In contrast to the standard construction of models for optimal strategic decision-making, the essays in this book emphasise interpretation, learning by doing, trust and co-operation in the international business community. The editors focus upon business relationships within and between firms as well as the importance of middle management in the international arena.

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