This book combines linguistic and historical approaches with the latest techniques of DNA analysis and shows the insights these offer for every kind of genealogical research. It focuses on British names, tracing their origins to different parts of the British Isles and Europe and revealing how names often remain concentrated in the districts where they first became established centuries ago. In the process the book casts fresh light on the ancient peopling of the British Isles. The authors consider why some names die out while others spread across the globe. They use recent advances in DNA testing to investigate whether particular surnames have single, dual, or multiple origins, and to find out if the various forms of a single name have a common origin. They show how information from DNA can be combined with historical evidence and techniques to distinguish between individuals with the same name and different names with similar spellings, and to identifty the name of the same individual or family spelt in various ways in different times and places. The final chapter of this paperback edition, looking at the use of genetics in historical research, has been updated to include new work on the DNA of Richard III.
This book combines linguistic and historical approaches with the latest techniques of DNA analysis and show the insights these offer for every kind of genealogical research. The book will be welcomed by all those engaged in genealogical research, including everyone seeking to discover the histories of their names and families.
DNA testing is now being used by thousands of genealogists around the world. DNA and Family History is the first guide to this pioneering subject, designed for family historians and surname study organizers at any stage in their research. In simple language aimed at non-scientists, Chris Pomery examines the background and the issues.
An easy-to-use guide to finding one's ancestors with the latest in new technology and scientific techniques—including blogs, web auctions, wikis, and YouTube Presenting the future of family history, this up-to-date book offers a guide to using social networking, such as Facebook and Twitter, as a research tool and explains the facts and potential of DNA testing for the genealogist. Family history research has come a long way from the local record office—now 21st-century scientific and technological developments have changed the way people look into their family pasts, allowing them to delve further back. Many tools which were not conceived with the genealogist in mind are increasingly being exploited by family historians, either to advance their research or to network with other genealogists. Many family historians struggle to cope with these new technologies and this book explains how to use these new tools effectively.
First practical, easy-to-use guide to the latest techniques. Comprehensive, authoritative overview with detailed explanations . Extensive internet sources. Surname research is an important part of family history involving the discovery of the origins, changes and meaning of your family name. Surnames have always been a source of fascination for family historians, but the definitions provided in surname dictionaries are often woefully inadequate. The explosion of internet sources in the last decade has made the study of surnames an easier proposition than ever before, and new developments in genetic genealogy are advancing our knowledge and understanding of surnames. This book provides a comprehensive guide to researching your surname. It will take you through the available resources both online and offline to enable you to understand the origins, meaning, evolution, frequency and distribution of your surname.
A clear, practical and up-to-date guide to genetic testing in family history research, including advice on choosing a test and using your results
Finally, in the rapidly evolving field of genetic genealogy an up-to-date resource is here! A Genetic Genealogy Handbook: The Basics and Beyond provides genealogists with the knowledge and confidence to use DNA testing for family research. The book guides genealogists in understanding various tests and determining what DNA segments came from which ancestor. The book explains how DNA testing helps when written records stop and discusses how testing proves or disprove oral family history. Learn which tests help adoptees; understand why you resemble your relatives and how testing can connect you with cousins you never knew. Discover how to encourage potential cousins to test and learn guidelines for becoming a project administrator, genetic genealogy speaker or facilitator for your genealogical society’s DNA interest group. A Genetic Genealogy Handbook: The Basics and Beyond helps experienced and fledgling researchers become genetic genealogists able to use DNA testing to resolve genealogical roadblocks.
From the author of The Family Tree Detective, this guide provides the amateur genealogist or family historian with the skills to research the distribution and history of a surname. Colin Rogers uses a sample of 100 names, many of them common, to follow the migration of people through the centuries. Each of the 100 names is mapped since the Doomsday book in 1086. For those whose name is not among the sample, the book shows how to find out where namesakes live now, how they moved around the country through time, and how the name originated from a placename, a nickname or an occupation. Colin Rogers finishes this work by showing how the distribution of surnames can be studied irrespective of the size of the surrounding population, and reaches some interesting conclusions about which names are more reliable guides to migration since the 14th century.
This is a book for those thousands of family historians who have already made some progress in tracing their family tree and have become interested in the places where their ancestors lived, worked and raised children. It emphasises the diversity and extraordinary complexity of the rural and urban communities in provincial England even before the great changes associated with the Industrial Revolution.
Find out what your surname means and trace your ancestors who share it too. Perhaps your surname is that of a Norman who came to Britain after the Battle of Hastings; or a Celtic clan name. Maybe it is an old English trade. It may be distinctive of a particular location. And just possibly you might be related to everyone who bears the name. Find out! Your surname is part of you -- so use this book to discover what it really means. This comprehensive book will show you how to research your surname and your family tree, both in earliest and in more recent years. It provides practical activities to investigate the meaning of any British surname. You will discover: -- The meaning of your surname -- How old it is -- Where it comes from -- What associations it has today -- How to use your surname to trace ancestors You may also be able to take part in a One Name Study or use DNA profiling to make contact with other people who bear your surname and with whom you share distant ancestors.
Surnames have long provided key links in historical research. This ground-breaking work shows that English christian names are also significant for those researching local communities and family history - and that they are a fascinating topic in their own right. Did you know, for instance, that the names Philip and Thomas were once used for girls? Or that there was a woman called Diot Coke in 1379? When George Redmonds became interested in christian names, he found that the information on his own name in dictionaries was contradicted by local records and that the standard works' emphasis on etymology only gave part of the story. Half a lifetime's research has convinced him that every christian name has a 'pedigree', which can be regional, local or even centered on one family. Here he explores the implications of this for both amateur and academic historians. Drawing on examples from Anne to Zaccheus, he covers a wealth of topics including the stabilisation of first names as surnames; the influence of individuals, parents, godparents and communities on naming; the popularity of names over the last 700 years; and more recent changes in naming practice. He challenges many published assumptions - and offers new insights into the customs and attitudes of our ancestors from the Middle Ages to the present day.
Written by two of the country's top genealogists, Trace Your Roots with DNA is the first book to explain how new and groundbreaking genetic testing can help you research your ancestry According to American Demographics, 113 million Americans have begun to trace their roots, making genealogy the second most popular hobby in the country (after gardening). Enthusiasts clamor for new information from dozens of subscription-based websites, email newsletters, and magazines devoted to the subject. For these eager roots-seekers looking to take their searches to the next level, DNA testing is the answer. After a brief introduction to genealogy and genetics fundamentals, the authors explain the types of available testing, what kind of information the tests can provide, how to interpret the results, and how the tests work (it doesn't involve digging up your dead relatives). It's in expensive, easy to do, and the results are accurate: It's as simple as swabbing the inside of your cheek and popping a sample in the mail. Family lore has it that a branch of our family emigrated to Argentina and now I've found some people there with our name. Can testing tell us whether we're from the same family? My mother was adopted and doesn't know her ethnicity. Are there any tests available to help her learn about her heritage? I just discovered someone else with my highly unusual surname. How can we find out if we have a common ancestor? These are just a few of the types of genealogical scenarios readers can pursue. The authors reveal exactly what is possible-and what is not possible-with genetic testing. They include case studies of both famous historial mysteries and examples of ordinary folks whose exploration of genetic genealogy has enabled them to trace their roots.
An easy-to-use guide to finding one's ancestors with the latest in new technology and scientific techniques—including blogs, web auctions, wikis, and YouTube Presenting the future of family history, this up-to-date book offers a guide to using social networking, such as Facebook and Twitter, as a research tool and explains the facts and potential of DNA testing for the genealogist. Family history research has come a long way from the local record office—now 21st-century scientific and technological developments have changed the way people look into their family pasts, allowing them to delve further back. Many tools which were not conceived with the genealogist in mind are increasingly being exploited by family historians, either to advance their research or to network with other genealogists. Many family historians struggle to cope with these new technologies and this book explains how to use these new tools effectively.
THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER Surnames are much more than convenient identity tags; they are windows into our families’ pasts. Some suggest ancestral trades (Butcher, Smith, Roper) or physical appearance (Long, Brown, Thynne). Some provide clues to where we come from (McDonald, Evans, Patel). And some – Rymer, Brocklebank, Stolbof – offer a hint of something just a little more exotic or esoteric. All are grist to the mill for David McKie who, in What’s in a Surname?, sets off on a journey around Britain to find out how such appellations have evolved and what they tell us about ourselves. En route he looks at the surname’s tentative beginnings in medieval times, and the myriad routes by which particular names became established. He considers some curious byways: the rise and fall of the multi-barrel surname and the Victorian reinvention of ‘embarrassing’ surnames among them. He considers whether fortune favours those whose surnames come at the beginning of the alphabet. And he celebrates the remarkable and the quirky, from the fearsome Ridley (the cry of which once struck terror in the hearts of their neighbours) to the legend-encrusted Tichborne, whose most famous holders were destined to suffer misfortune and controversy. Elegiac and amusing by turns, he offers a wonderfully entertaining wander along the footpaths of the nation’s history and culture, celebrating not just the Smiths and Joneses of these islands but the Chaceporcs and Swetinbeddes, too.
Family names are an essential part of everyone's personal history. The story of their evolution is integral to family history and fascinating in its own right. Formed from first names, place names, nicknames and occupations, names allow us to trace the movements of our ancestors from the middle ages to the present day. David Hey shows how, when and where families first got their names, and proves that most families stayed close to their places of origin. Settlement patterns and family groupings can be traced back towards their origin by using national and local records. Family Names and Family History tells anyone interested in tracing their own name how to set about doing so.
To accompany the third series of the award-winning BBC television series, this book gives the amateur genealogist all the tools to trace their ancestors back over six centuries, taking them on a fascinating historical journey into the past. This wonderfully readable book takes the reader back through time past the usual family tree landmark of 1837, when birth, marriage and death registration were made mandatory, to allow the reader to trace their ancestors back to Tudor times. Much more detailed than the previous tie-ins, this book will explore the history which led to the dispersion of the population, it will look at local genealogy and connect the history of Britain with the people who lived during the times and the records they left. Whether your 17th-century ancestor was a merchant seamen listed on the muster rolls, or of a trade registered through the Livery guilds of Newcastle, Yorkshire or London; a midwife licensed by the church from medieval times (in case they had to baptise a sick baby at birth); an alehouse owner (victualler) who was licensed from the 1500s onwards; or an afro-Caribbean immigrant from the 1700s, this book fills the gaps in your family tree and gives you the resources to search out your medieval ancestors. This book is a guide to tracing your family tree back for six centuries, into the time of Tudor kings and peasant uprisings, through a fascinating array of historical resources. It is also a fascinating social history of the peoples of the United Kingdom and how they were shaped by the events of their times.
Noted social scientist Eviatar Zerubavel casts a critical eye on how we trace our past-individually and collectively arguing that rather than simply find out who our ancestors are from genetics or history, we actually create the stories that make them our ancestors.

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