This book combines linguistic and historical approaches with the latest techniques of DNA analysis and shows the insights these offer for every kind of genealogical research. It focuses on British names, tracing their origins to different parts of the British Isles and Europe and revealing how names often remain concentrated in the districts where they first became established centuries ago. In the process the book casts fresh light on the ancient peopling of the British Isles. The authors consider why some names die out while others spread across the globe. They use recent advances in DNA testing to investigate whether particular surnames have single, dual, or multiple origins, and to find out if the various forms of a single name have a common origin. They show how information from DNA can be combined with historical evidence and techniques to distinguish between individuals with the same name and different names with similar spellings, and to identifty the name of the same individual or family spelt in various ways in different times and places. The final chapter of this paperback edition, looking at the use of genetics in historical research, has been updated to include new work on the DNA of Richard III.
A clear, practical and up-to-date guide to genetic testing in family history research, including advice on choosing a test and using your results
DNA testing is now being used by thousands of genealogists around the world. DNA and Family History is the first guide to this pioneering subject, designed for family historians and surname study organizers at any stage in their research. In simple language aimed at non-scientists, Chris Pomery examines the background and the issues.
How many DNA testing companies will show you how to interpret DNA test results for family history or direct you to instructional materials after you have had your DNA tested? Choose a company based on previous customer satisfaction, and whether the company gives you choices of how many markers you want, various ethnic and geographic databases, and surname projects based on DNA-driven genealogy. Before you select a company to test your DNA, find out how many genetic markers will be tested. For the maternal line, 400 base pairs of sequences are the minimum. For the paternal line (men only) 37 markers are great, but 25 markers also should be useful. Some companies offer a 12-marker test for surname genealogy groups at a special price. Find out how long the turnaround time is for waiting to receive your results. What is the reputation of the company? Do they have a contract with a university lab or a private lab? Who does the testing and who is the chief geneticist at their laboratory? What research articles, if any, has that scientist written or what research studies on DNA have been performed by the person in charge of the DNA testing at the laboratory? Who owns the DNA business that contracts with the lab? How involved in genealogy-related DNA projects and databases or services is the owner?
Die aufregende Geschichte der Entschlüsselung des Neandertalergenoms – und das lebendige Porträt der neuen Wissenschaft der Paläogenetik In einer folgenreichen Nacht im Jahre 1996 gelang Svante Pääbo die Entschlüsselung der ersten DNA-Sequenzen eines Neandertalers. Eine Sensation! Die verblüffenden Erkenntnisse revolutionierten unser Bild von der Entwicklung des Homo sapiens. Jetzt erzählt der preisgekrönte Wissenschaftler seine persönliche Geschichte und verschränkt sie mit der Geschichte des neuen Gebiets, das er maßgeblich mitentwickelte: der Paläogenetik - von den ersten Analysen an altägyptischen Mumien bis hin zu Mammuts, Höhlenbären und Riesenfaultieren. Ein faszinierender Blick hinter die Kulissen der Spitzenforschung in Deutschland und der spannende Entwicklungsroman einer Wissenschaft, deren Ergebnisse vor wenigen Jahrzehnten noch niemand erahnen konnte
DNA testing can serve as a powerful tool that unlocks the hidden information within our bodies for family history research. This book explains how genetic genealogy works and answers the questions of genealogists and individuals seeking information on their family trees. • Presents an overview to genealogical principles and an introduction to DNA testing for nonexpert audiences • Explains how genetic genealogy can provide data from within our bodies that tells us about who we are, who our ancestors were, and what characteristics our descendants may have • Addresses key legal and ethical issues regarding DNA testing • Describes the accepted protocols of DNA collection, handling, processing, evaluation, and interpretation that make DNA information more reliable than the other kinds of genealogical information
Every surname has its own story to tell, and a surname study is a natural complement to family history research. The study of surnames has been revolutionised in the last decade with the increasing availability of online resources, and it is now easier than ever before to explore the history, evolution, distribution and meaning of your family name. The Surnames Handbook provides a comprehensive guide to researching your surname using genealogical methods in conjunction with the latest advances in DNA testing and surname mapping. The book explores the key resources that are used to study a surname and is packed with links to relevant websites giving you everything you need to research your surname in one compact volume.DEBBIE KENNETT, an editor and genealogist, has been researching her family tree for over a decade. She is the founder of the Cruse/Cruwys one-name study and runs three large international DNA projects. She writes for many family history magazines. Her first book DNA and Social Networking is also published by The History Press.‘I believe this handbook, which is a significant contribution to our understanding in this field, deserves not only our admiration and gratitude, but also a place on our bookshelves.’Derek A. Palgrave – President of the Guild of One-Name Studies
Scientists in the news speak out from opposite sides of the fence on the question of DNA testing for researching family history and ancestry. How do you interpret your own DNA test results? How do you work with or research oral history? What's the cultural component behind a trait as biological as your genes? If you're a beginning family historian, an oral history researcher, or a person with no science background fascinated with ancestry, here's how to understand and use the results of DNA tests. Scientists, media, historians, and business owners share different opinions on whether DNA testing is a useful tool in the hands of family historians. Steve Olson, author of the book, Mapping Human History in a telephone interview with me answered my question, "What do you say about using DNA as a tool for genealogy-to extend family history research?" Does Steve Olson think DNA testing as a tool is useful to genealogists? What does Bryan Sykes, author of the best-selling, The Seven Daughters of Eve have to say? Sykes's book has a very different opinion about DNA testing and genealogy/family history research. The two have opposite views. Numerous scientists comment. Sykes is associated with Oxford Ancestors, the world's first company to harness the power and precision of modern DNA-based genetics for use in genealogy. The motto on the Oxford Ancestors Web site reads: "Putting the genes in genealogy." Use these resources and easy to understand explanations for family history research.
Surnames have long provided key links in historical research. This ground-breaking work shows that English christian names are also significant for those researching local communities and family history - and that they are a fascinating topic in their own right. Did you know, for instance, that the names Philip and Thomas were once used for girls? Or that there was a woman called Diot Coke in 1379? When George Redmonds became interested in christian names, he found that the information on his own name in dictionaries was contradicted by local records and that the standard works' emphasis on etymology only gave part of the story. Half a lifetime's research has convinced him that every christian name has a 'pedigree', which can be regional, local or even centered on one family. Here he explores the implications of this for both amateur and academic historians. Drawing on examples from Anne to Zaccheus, he covers a wealth of topics including the stabilisation of first names as surnames; the influence of individuals, parents, godparents and communities on naming; the popularity of names over the last 700 years; and more recent changes in naming practice. He challenges many published assumptions - and offers new insights into the customs and attitudes of our ancestors from the Middle Ages to the present day.
Finally, in the rapidly evolving field of genetic genealogy an up-to-date resource is here! A Genetic Genealogy Handbook: The Basics and Beyond provides genealogists with the knowledge and confidence to use DNA testing for family research. The book guides genealogists in understanding various tests and determining what DNA segments came from which ancestor. The book explains how DNA testing helps when written records stop and discusses how testing proves or disprove oral family history. Learn which tests help adoptees; understand why you resemble your relatives and how testing can connect you with cousins you never knew. Discover how to encourage potential cousins to test and learn guidelines for becoming a project administrator, genetic genealogy speaker or facilitator for your genealogical society’s DNA interest group. A Genetic Genealogy Handbook: The Basics and Beyond helps experienced and fledgling researchers become genetic genealogists able to use DNA testing to resolve genealogical roadblocks.
650 Millionen Europäer sollen von nur sieben Urmüttern abstammen? Sie meinen, das kann nicht sein? Bryan Sykes, Professor für Genetik an der Universität Oxford, hat die Mitochondrien-DNA Tausender Europäer analysiert und konnte dabei sieben Bausteine entdeckten, die sich auf sieben Töchter der Urmutter Eva zurückführen lassen. Darüber hinaus lässt sich sagen, wann unsere Vorfahren erstmals auftraten, wo und wie sie lebten und wohin sie gingen ═ somit kann jeder von uns herausfinden, von welchem der sieben Stämme er abstammt: Folgen Sie Bryan Sykes auf seiner sensationellen Reise in unsere Vergangenheit!
Here's how to trace Jewish DNA specific to Eastern European Ashkenazim through a history of migrations toward a merging mosaic of communities. A perfect book for beginners in interpreting your DNA test results for family history and ancestry and taking a closer look at the founding mothers of Eastern European Jewish communities as well as the fathers. Where did the women originate? What directions were the migrations in ancient, medieval, and later times? And how did this bring about the particular DNA/genetic patterns we see today in the diverse Eastern European Jewish communities now found all over the world. Look up the genealogy of Jewish genes/DNA through 3,000 years of history. Here's how to interpret your own results. You don't need a science background to match your DNA to your most recent common ancestor who lived 250 or 100 or 1,000 years ago. Scientists speak out on the founding mothers and fathers of the Ashkenazic Jewish communities.
"This book looks at all the latest advances in DNA testing from the Y-chromosome tests used in surname projects through to the latest autosomal DNA tests. Debbie Kennett explores the use of new social media, including Facebook, Twitter, blogs and wikis, along with more traditional networking methods. DNA and social Networking is an indispensable guide to the use of twenty-first-century technology in family history research" --Dust jacket flap.
DNA testing led to information showing where my ancestors traveled and lived over an approximate 50,000 years. This journey began in Eastern central Africa and ended with my ancestors moving to America in 1717. The history of the locations where my DNA type was found led me to realize how much of the world's history was developing where they traveled and lived. Their journey took them from Africa to Anatolia, the Fertile Crescent area (Bible Lands) and across the Alps into Switzerland where they began using the surname Knusli. In Switzerland, they joined the Mennonite Religion and suffered religious persecution and were forced to move to Alsace on the Rhine River. In 1717, they made the journey to America and settled near Lancaster, PA. The Knusli surname has changed many times over the years including Nicely, Knisely, Kneisly, Knisley, and others. DNA testing has linked these and many other spellings to the Knusli family line. This book is the result of 15 years of family research.
Two leading genealogists explain how the latest techniques in genetic testing can help readers research their ancestry and family history, discussing what kind of information DNA testing can provide, how to interpret the results, what is and is not possible with genetic testing, and more. Original. 15,000 first printing.
Completely updated for today's search tactics and blockades, The Everything Family Tree Book has even more insight for the stumped! Whether you're searching in a grandparent's attic or through the most cryptic archiving systems, this book has brand-new chapters on what readers have been asking for: Genetics, DNA, and medical information Surname origins and naming Appendix on major genealogical repositories, libraries, and archives Systems for filing and organizing The latest computer software Land, probate, and estate records Chock-full of tips the competitors don't have, this is the one-stop resource for successful sleuthing!
René Corneille Deboeck (1913-1985), son of Guillaume Deboeck and Joanne Nobels, married Marie Louise Girardin (1918-2001), daughter of Jean Girardin and Josephina De Maseneer. Ancestors, descendants and relatives lived mainly in Belgium. Deboeck is also spelled de Boeck and de Bock. Includes De Zutter and related families.
“WHO ARE YOU AND WHERE DO YOU COME FROM? ” As a historian, Buzzy Jackson thought she knew the answers to these simple questions—that is, until she took a look at her scrawny family tree. With a name like Jackson (the twentieth most common American surname), she knew she must have more relatives and more family history out there, somewhere. Her first visit to the Boulder Genealogy Society brought her more questions than answers . . . but it also gave her a tantalizing peek into the fascinating (and enormous) community of family-tree huggers and after-hours Alex Haleys. In Shaking the Family Tree, Jackson dives headfirst into her family gene pool: flying cross-country to locate an ancient family graveyard, embarking on a weeklong genealogy Caribbean cruise, and even submitting her DNA for testing to try to find her Jacksons. And in the process of researching her own family lore (Who was Bullwhip Jackson?) she meets legions of other genealogy buffs who are as interesting as they are driven—from the boy who saved his allowance so he could order his great-grandfather’s death certificate to the woman who spends her free time documenting the cemeteries of Colorado ghost towns. Through Jackson’s research she connects with distant relatives, traces her roots back more than 250 years and in the process comes to discover—genetically, historically, and emotionally—the true meaning of “family” for herself.

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