This book critically examines the complex interactions between media and crime. Written with an engaging and authoritative voice, it guides you through all the key issues, ranging from news reporting of crime, media constructions of children and women, moral panics and media and the police to 'reality' crime shows, surveillance and social control. This third edition: Explores innovations in technology and forms of reporting, including citizen journalism. Examines the impact of new media including mobile, Internet and digital technologies, and social networking sites. Features chapters dedicated to the issues around cybercrime and crime film, along with new content on terrorism and the media. Shows you how to research media and crime. Includes discussion questions, further reading and a glossary. Now features a companion website, complete with links to journal articles, relevant websites and blogs. This is essential reading for your studies in criminology, media studies, cultural studies and sociology. The Key Approaches to Criminology series celebrates the removal of traditional barriers between disciplines and, specifically, reflects criminology’s interdisciplinary nature and focus. It brings together some of the leading scholars working at the intersections of criminology and related subjects. Each book in the series helps readers to make intellectual connections between criminology and other discourses, and to understand the importance of studying crime and criminal justice within the context of broader debates. The series is intended to have appeal across the entire range of undergraduate and postgraduate studies and beyond, comprising books which offer introductions to the fields as well as advancing ideas and knowledge in their subject areas.
Surveillance has a long-standing relationship with crime and its identification, prevention, detection and punishment. With information on each citizen spanning up to 700 databases, and over 4 million CCTV cameras in the United Kingdom alone, this book explores how new technologies have given rise to new forms of monitoring and control. Offering a comprehensive understanding of the relationship between surveillance, crime and criminal justice, this book explores: the development of surveillance technologies within a broad historical context how new surveillance technologies are shaped by existing social relations, political practices, cultural traditions and organizational contexts the implications of the use of surveillance in responding to crime (including biometrics, DNA samples and electronic monitoring) how 'new' surveillance technologies reinforce 'old' social divisions - particularly along the lines of class, race, gender and age. The book draws upon theoretical debates from a range of disciplines to shed light on this topical subject. Engaging and authoritative, this is an important read for advanced students and academics in criminology, criminal justice, social policy and sociology. The Key Approaches to Criminology series celebrates the removal of traditional barriers between disciplines and, specifically, reflects criminology’s interdisciplinary nature and focus. It brings together some of the leading scholars working at the intersections of criminology and related subjects. Each book in the series helps readers to make intellectual connections between criminology and other discourses, and to understand the importance of studying crime and criminal justice within the context of broader debates. The series is intended to have appeal across the entire range of undergraduate and postgraduate studies and beyond, comprising books which offer introductions to the fields as well as advancing ideas and knowledge in their subject areas.
Globalization and Crime provides a comprehensive and accessible account of the consequences of globalization in the post 9/11 world. It explains theories around globalization and how these shed light upon the study of crime. Furthermore, the book examines the challenges the various global flows represent for the nature of governance, state sovereignty, and crime control. Presenting an expert and interdisciplinary summary of complex debates, this book addresses a variety of highly topical issues.
The bestselling Media and Crime returns with a fully revised and updated new edition. Established in the field as the market leader, the book explores the complex interactions between media and crime from a critical and authoritative standpoint. Retaining and updating coverage of the core issues in the subject: news reporting of crime; media constructions of children and women; moral panics; media and the police; 'reality' crime shows; surveillance and social control, the book now also includes: - additional chapters on cybercrime and crime film - updated content on new media including mobile, Internet and digital technologies, and social networking sites - discussions on how to research media and crime - fully updated references and student-friendly features - including discussion questions, further reading and glossary. Its lucid and engaging style, thought-provoking content and panoramic coverage of key debates and issues make this the text on media and crime. Essential reading for students in criminology, media studies, cultural studies and sociology, academics and researchers.
This lively and accessible text provides an introduction to the history of crime and crime control. It explains the historical background that is essential for an understanding of contemporary criminal justice, and examines the historical context for contemporary criminological debates. Topics covered include: Crime statistics Constructions of criminality Policing Prisons Surveillance Governance White-collar crime Immigration and crime For each topic, the book provides an overview of current research, comment on current arguments and links to wider debates. The Key Approaches to Criminology series celebrates the removal of traditional barriers between disciplines and, specifically, reflects criminology’s interdisciplinary nature and focus. It brings together some of the leading scholars working at the intersections of criminology and related subjects. Each book in the series helps readers to make intellectual connections between criminology and other discourses, and to understand the importance of studying crime and criminal justice within the context of broader debates. The series is intended to have appeal across the entire range of undergraduate and postgraduate studies and beyond, comprising books which offer introductions to the fields as well as advancing ideas and knowledge in their subject areas.
This book is a comprehensive and critical introduction to the field of gender and crime, re-thinking the key themes and debates within a human rights framework. Integrating empirical, theoretical and policy-related material, this Second Edition has been significantly updated, and now includes; Full consideration of the 2010-2015 Coalition Government and its effect on gender and crime within England and Wales A new chapter relating criminological theory to gender and crime A new chapter discussing the history of gender and crime A new chapter analysing contemporary issues in gender and crime in a globalised world Fully updated learning features including; Chapter Overviews, Key Words, Study Questions, Chapter Summaries, Key Further Readings and a Glossary. Gender and Crime: A Human Rights Approach is essential reading for students studying criminology, sociology, social policy and gender studies.
MEDIA, CRIME, AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE is the definitive text on media and criminal justice. The book features impeccable scholarship, a direct and approachable style, and an engaging format--supported by visual examples and sidebar material that complements the narrative. With the ever-increasing role of media in both reporting crime and shaping it into infotainment, the importance of the interplay between contemporary media and the criminal justice system is greater today than ever before. Author Ray Surette comprehensively surveys this interplay and showcases its impact, emphasizing that people use media-provided knowledge to construct a picture of the world and then act based on this constructed reality. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.
Cites successful examples of community-based policing
In today's society, the public perception of crime has been skewed by how the media depicts it. People use the media for enjoyment, companionship, surveillance, and interpretation. The problem is that it becomes hard to separate fact from entertainment. This raises several questions. How are we consuming media? Are we consuming reality within the news? And are we consuming harmless pleasure from entertainment media? In Crime, Media, and Reality: Examining Mixed Messages about Crime and Justice in Popular Media, Venessa Garcia and Samantha Garcia Arkerson focus predominantly on the social constructions of crime and justice and how we absorb them. They look at the influence of crime news and true crime television series that prevent the public from understanding pure entertainment from the realities of crime and justice. They bring to light the social science knowledge missed by media "infotainment," which has blurred the line between information and entertainment. Throughout, all different forms of media are discussed, news media, crime dramas and true crime television series. In doing so, they keep all of its fascinating coverage while uncovering the reality of crime and justice. This book adds significant information to the constructs held by the general public by placing media depictions into historical, legal, and social context.
This engaging and timely collection gathers together for the first time key and classic readings in the ever-expanding area of crime and media. Accessible yet challenging, and packed with additional pedagogical devices, Crime and Media: A Reader will be an invaluable resource for students and academics studying crime, media, culture, surveillance and control.
In the fourth edition of Essential Criminology, authors Mark M. Lanier, Stuart Henry, and Desire .M. Anastasia build upon this best-selling critical review of criminology, which has become essential reading for students of criminology in the 21st century. Designed as an alternative to overly comprehensive, lengthy, and expensive introductory texts, Essential Criminology is, as its title implies, a concise overview of the field. The book guides students through the various definitions of crime and the different ways crime is measured. It then covers the major theories of crime, from individual-level, classical, and rational choice to biological, psychological, social learning, social control, and interactionist perspectives. In this latest edition, the authors explore the kind of criminology that is needed for the globally interdependent twenty-first century. With cutting-edge updates, illustrative real-world examples, and new study tools for students, this text is a necessity for both undergraduate and graduate courses in criminology.
'Following the outstanding introduction by the authors there are fifteen excellent original articles devoted to an integrated theory of the relationship between the state and crime. This work is on the cutting edge of critical criminology. It is a must read.' - William J. Chambliss, Professor of Sociology, The George Washington University, USA. 'This book is a superb compilation of original papers by an impressive roster of authors. While the articles cover a wide range of empirical issues, from Northern Ireland and corporate crime to youth crime and heterosexual hegemony they all explore the implications, strategies and mechanisms of state power. There isn't a weak paper here: all are extensively documented, well written, persuasive and scholarly in the very best sense.' - Professor Laureen Snider, Queens University, Canada 'State, Power, Crime is a hugely important book for these times. Bringing together some of the most original minds in criminology it offers a critical analysis of the state, how it constructs crime, responds to it and, at times, engages in the very same. The book is essential reading for anyone interested in justice, freedom and equality.' - Paddy Rawlinson, London School of Economics Featuring contributions by many of the leading scholars in the field, this seminal text explores the key themes and debates on state power today, in relation to crime and social order. It critically evaluates a range of substantive areas of criminological concern, including terrorism, surveillance, violence and the media. State, Power, Crime provides: "historical overviews of key theories about state power " assessment of the relationship between crime, criminal justice and the state " analysis of the development of law and order policy " discussion of the impact of structural fissures such as gender, race and sexuality " an overview of current research and writing " critical reflection on the future direction of research and analysis " advice on further reading. In 1978, with the publication of Hall et al's Policing the Crisis and Poulantzas's State, Power, Socialism, the complexity of the state's interventions in maintaining a capitalist social order were laid bare for critical criminological analysis. State, Power, Crime offers an up-to-date and comprehensive examination of the challenges posed by state power, in relation to both criminal and social justice.
Across America today gated communities sprawl out from urban centers, employers enforce mandatory drug testing, and schools screen students with metal detectors. Social problems ranging from welfare dependency to educational inequality have been reconceptualized as crimes, with an attendant focus on assigning fault and imposing consequences. Even before the recent terrorist attacks, non-citizen residents had become subject to an increasingly harsh regime of detention and deportation, and prospective employees subjected to background checks. How and when did our everyday world become dominated by fear, every citizen treated as a potential criminal?In this startlingly original work, Jonathan Simon traces this pattern back to the collapse of the New Deal approach to governing during the 1960s when declining confidence in expert-guided government policies sent political leaders searching for new models of governance. The War on Crime offered a ready solution to their problem: politicians set agendas by drawing analogies to crime and redefined the ideal citizen as a crime victim, one whose vulnerabilities opened the door to overweening government intervention. By the 1980s, this transformation of the core powers of government had spilled over into the institutions that govern daily life. Soon our schools, our families, our workplaces, and our residential communities were being governed through crime.This powerful work concludes with a call for passive citizens to become engaged partners in the management of risk and the treatment of social ills. Only by coming together to produce security, can we free ourselves from a logic of domination by others, and from the fear that currently rules our everyday life.
From random security checks at airports to the use of risk assessment in sentencing, actuarial methods are being used more than ever to determine whom law enforcement officials target and punish. And with the exception of racial profiling on our highways and streets, most people favor these methods because they believe they’re a more cost-effective way to fight crime. In Against Prediction, Bernard E. Harcourt challenges this growing reliance on actuarial methods. These prediction tools, he demonstrates, may in fact increase the overall amount of crime in society, depending on the relative responsiveness of the profiled populations to heightened security. They may also aggravate the difficulties that minorities already have obtaining work, education, and a better quality of life—thus perpetuating the pattern of criminal behavior. Ultimately, Harcourt shows how the perceived success of actuarial methods has begun to distort our very conception of just punishment and to obscure alternate visions of social order. In place of the actuarial, he proposes instead a turn to randomization in punishment and policing. The presumption, Harcourt concludes, should be against prediction.
This revised and expanded Third Edition of the internationally acclaimed Criminological Perspectives is the most comprehensive reader available in the field. Wide-ranging and global in scope and coverage, Criminological Perspectives will enable you to critically engage with the various concepts and theoretical positions that you'll encounter throughout your studies. In addition to essays that have had a seminal influence on the development of criminology, new articles have been included to cover topics of contemporary criminological significance, including: - surveillance - digitized crime - terrorism and political violence - environmental crime - human trafficking - techno-social networks - narco-crime - global inequalities The 56 articles are organised thematically, complete with introductions that place them in context and to illustrate the approaches taken by different schools of criminological thought. Criminological Perspectives will prove an indispensible resource, whether you're studying criminology, criminal justice studies, socio-legal studies, penology, security studies, surveillance studies, or sociology.
Criminology: The Key Concepts is an authoritative and comprehensive study guide and reference resource that will take you through all the concepts, approaches, issues and institutions central to the study of crime in contemporary society. Topics covered in this easy to use A-Z guide include: policing, sentencing and the justice system types of crime, including corporate crime, cybercrime, sex and hate crimes feminist, marxist and cultural approaches to criminology terrorism, state crime, war crimes and human rights social issues such as anti-social behaviour, domestic violence and pornography criminal psychology and deviance Fully cross-referenced, with extensive suggestions for further reading and in-depth study of the topics discussed, this is an essential reference guide for students of Criminology at all levels.
Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) cameras are a prominent, if increasingly familiar, feature of urbanism. They symbolize the faith that spatial authorities place in technical interventions for the treatment of social problems. CCTV was principally introduced to sterilize municipalities, to govern conducts and to protect properties. Vast expenditure has been committed to these technologies without a clear sense of how precisely they influence things. CCTV cameras might appear inanimate, but Opening the Black Box shows them to be vital mediums within relational circulations of supervision. The book principally excavates the social relations entwining the everyday application of CCTV. It takes the reader on a journey from living beneath the camera, to working behind the lens. Attention focuses on the labour exerted by camera operators as they source and process distanced spectacles. These workers are paid to scan monitor screens in search of disorderly vistas, visualizing stimuli according to its perceived riskiness and/or allurement. But the projection of this gaze can draw an unsettling reflection. It can mean enduring behavioural extremities as an impotent witness. It can also entail making spontaneous decisions that determine the course of justice. Opening the Black Box, therefore, contemplates the seductive and traumatic dimensions of monitoring telemediated ‘riskscapes’ through the prism of camera circuitry. It probes the positioning of camera operators as ‘vicarious’ custodians of a precarious social order and engages their subjective experiences. It reveals the work of watching to be an ambiguous practice: as much about managing external disturbances on the street as managing internal disruptions in the self.
Presents insights in the sociological study of surveillance and governance in the context of criminal justice and other control strategies. This volume provides a varied set of theoretical perspectives and substantive research domains on the qualities and quantities of some of the transformations of social control.
Pre-crime aims to pre-empt ‘would-be-criminals’ and predict future crime. Although the term is borrowed from science ?ction, the drive to predict and pre-empt crime is a present-day reality. This book critically explores this major twenty-first century development in crime and justice. This first in-depth study of pre-crime defines and describes different types of pre-crime and compares it to traditional post-crime and crime risk approaches. It analyses the rationales that underpin pre-crime as a response to threats, particularly terrorism, and shows how it is spreading to other areas. It also underlines the historical continuities that prefigure the emergence of pre-crime, as well as exploring the new technologies and forms of surveillance that claim the ability to predict crime and identify future criminals. Through the use of examples and case studies it provides insights into how pre-crime generates the crimes it purports to counter, providing compelling evidence of the problems that arise when we act as if we know the future and aim to control it through punishing, disrupting or incapacitating those we predict might commit future crimes. Drawing on literature from criminology, law, international relations, security and globalization studies, this book sets out a coherent framework for the continued study of pre-crime and addresses key issues such as terminology, its links to past practises, its likely future trajectories and its impact on security, crime and justice. It is essential reading for academics and students in security studies, criminology, counter-terrorism, surveillance, policing and law, as well as practitioners and professionals in these fields.
Written by active researcher and bestselling author, Frank E. Hagan, Introduction to Criminology, Ninth Edition is a comprehensive introduction to the study of criminology, focusing on the vital core of criminological theory— theory, method, and criminal behavior. With more attention to crime typologies than most introductory texts, Hagan investigates all forms of criminal activity, such as organized crime, white collar crime, political crime, and environmental crime. The methods of operation, the effects on society and policy decisions, and the connection between theory and criminal behavior are all explained in a clear, accessible manner. All statistics, tables, and figures have been updated, as have the photographs, supplements, and audio and video packages in the new edition to make the material most relevant for your course.

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