This is a wonderful book, intended as a companion and guide to a reading of the Ethics . Sparshott's intention is to display the continuity of thought in the text, rather than the traditional approach of examining and criticizing individual sections. The chapters are entitled What is Best for People (I i-xii; 1094a1-1102a4), Reason in Action (I xiii-VI; 1102a5-1145a11); The Pathology of Practical Reason (VII; 1145a15-1154b34); Love, Consciousness, and Society (VIII-IX; 1155a1-1172a15); The Worth of Pleasure (X i-v; 1172a19-1176a29); and The Good Life and the Best Life: Outline of a Discourse (X vi-viii; 1176a30-1179a32), and there is an interesting appendix on the world of Aristotle's theoretical construction. All Greek is transliterated and a glossary provided for these terms. The author's love of his topic is obvious throughout this book, which is written with clarity and cogency. It deserves to be read by everyone seeking to understand Aristotle's Ethics .
Devon Strong was a farmer and bison rancher in the Western United States whose utterly unique approach to biodynamic agriculture and animal husbandry, stemming as it did from his profound connection with the spirituality of the (Native North American) Lakota people, was just beginning to draw worldwide interest at the time of his early and unexpected death in late 2015. A Lakota Approach to Biodynamics includes Devon's unfinished manuscript Taking Life Seriously, all of his published articles, as well as reports and remembrances from both his own family and leading figures of the international biodynamic movement. This book is both Devon s final word on the legacy of his singular way of relating to land and animals, and a loving tribute to his vision, inspiration, and intentions for the future of agriculture. "
Philosophy in a Meaningless Life provides an account of the nature of philosophy which is rooted in the question of the meaning of life. It makes a powerful and vivid case for believing that this question is neither obscure nor obsolete, but reflects a quintessentially human concern to which other traditional philosophical problems can be readily related; allowing them to be reconnected with natural interest, and providing a diagnosis of the typical lines of opposition across philosophy's debates. James Tartaglia looks at the various ways philosophers have tried to avoid the conclusion that life is meaningless, and in the process have distanced philosophy from the concept of transcendence. Rejecting all of this, Tartaglia embraces nihilism ('we are here with nothing to do'), and uses transcendence both to provide a new solution to the problem of consciousness, and to explain away perplexities about time and universals. He concludes that with more self-awareness, philosophy can attain higher status within a culture increasingly in need of it.
Watching the Trinity Broadcasting Network (TBN) many years ago, when the author heard that a born-again Christian committed suicide. The Lord said to her to go tell His people in a particular church what she went through. To tell them her personal encounter with the kingdom of darkness and how she overcame through the power invested in the name of Jesus Christ. Suicides and murder are influenced by the same force of darkness which God has given us the power through our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ to overcome. This book is an account of what she shared with God's people in that church. God did not keep His people here to live under the dictates of the evil one. This is a powerful book of faith and love for God. Though life can be difficult, God carries us through if we believe and trust in Him.
If there is anything that you wish to accomplish in your life. This book is what you need. Do you want to start a business? Do you want to ask for forgiveness? Do you want to reconcile with old friends or family? Do you want to be financial free? Do you want to lose weight? Do you want to get fit? Do you want to start over in life? Do you want to quit the job you hate? What are you waiting for? Just do it, You Only live Once. This book is your guide to getting things done. If your desire is to become a peak performer and make the best out of your life, this book will give you the strategy.
Real-Life Wisdom: Stories for the Road is an invaluable resource for anyone who cares about others and puts this compassion into action. Based on over a quarter-of-a-century of practical expertise, author Bob Ayres shares his insights, struggles, wisdom, and advice with humor and passion. Each chapter begins with a description of someone who taught him valuable insights. Included is scriptural wisdom from Proverbs and maxims from Dr. Charles W. Conn, former president of Lee University. Real-Life Wisdom is a recipe for healthy relationships and authentic Christian community. Whether you are a new volunteer at church or in the community, or have many years of ministry experience, Real-Life Wisdom is guaranteed to challenge, touch, and teach you. You will not put this book down unchanged. With a discussion guide for each chapter, it is a perfect small group study book or ideal for personal growth. Experience faith in action and learn valuable lessons to improve all your relationships. Who will benefit from Real-Life Wisdom: Stories for the Road? . Volunteers . Ministers . Ministry students . Families . Small-groups . Couples Real-Life Wisdom: Stories for the Road will take you on a new journey of insight. Are you ready for the trip? Jump in and travel down the road a ways.
“A magnificent achievement. In its power to touch the heart, to awaken consciousness, [The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying] is an inestimable gift.” —San Francisco Chronicle A newly revised and updated edition of the internationally bestselling spiritual classic, The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying, written by Sogyal Rinpoche, is the ultimate introduction to Tibetan Buddhist wisdom. An enlightening, inspiring, and comforting manual for life and death that the New York Times calls, “The Tibetan equivalent of [Dante’s] The Divine Comedy,” this is the essential work that moved Huston Smith, author of The World’s Religions, to proclaim, “I have encountered no book on the interplay of life and death that is more comprehensive, practical, and wise.”
Although the precise origin of Hector Hugh Munro's pen name is still unclear, writing under the name 'Saki' allowed the Edwardian satirist wide-ranging latitude to skewer the mores of the period. This collection includes a tale featuring Reginald, a multi-faceted character who embodies both the excesses and the virtues of the period.
Personal Synthesis is the most comprehensive model of personal development available. All the areas that play a part in everyday life, such as self-awareness, reasoning, confidence, coping, motivation, communicating, relationships and many others, are brought together and organised into a map. The book provides illuminating insights drawn from many sources for each of them.
Many of Stanley Kubrick's films are often interpreted as cold and ambiguous. Whether viewing Barry Lyndon, 2001, The Shining, or Eyes Wide Shut, there is a sense in which these films resist their own audiences, creating a distance from them. Though many note the coldness of Kubrick's films, a smaller number attempt to explore exactly how his body of work elicits this particular reaction. Fewer still attempt to articulate what it might mean to "feel" Stanley Kubrick's films. In The Kubrick Facade, Jason Sperb examines the narrative ambiguity of the director's films—from the voice-over narration in early works, including the once forgotten Fear and Desire—to the blank faces of characters in his later ones. In doing so, Sperb shows how both devices struggle in vain to make sense of the chaos and sterility of the cinematic surface.
Transcending the overplayed debate between utilitarians and rights theorists, the book offers a fresh methodological approach with specific constructive conclusions about our treatment of animals. David DeGrazia provides the most thorough discussion yet of whether equal consideration should be extended to animals' interests, and examines the issues of animal minds and animal well-being with an unparalleled combination of philosophical rigor and empirical documentation. This book is an important contribution to the field of animal ethics.
After a grueling escape north, Belle Palmer is free, yet lost and alone. Separated from her father on the harrowing journey, Belle has nowhere to turn until she finds shelter with the Bests, the first free family she's ever known. For the first time in her sixteen years, Belle is able to express herself freely—except where her feelings for a certain dark-eyed young man are concerned. Daniel Best is headed for great things. Educated and handsome, at eighteen he is full of the promise and dreams of his people, and is engaged to the prettiest (if the most spoiled) girl around. So when a bedraggled stranger arrives in his household and turns into a vibrant, lovely young woman, his attraction to her catches him entirely by surprise. While Belle is determined to deny her feelings for him, Daniel is caught between his conscience and his infatuation with her. That the two belong together is undeniable, but that it could ever happen seems impossible.
In the quarter century since the landmark Karen Ann Quinlan case, an ethical, legal, and societal consensus supporting patients' rights to refuse life-sustaining treatment has become a cornerstone of bioethics. Patients now legally can write advance directives to govern their treatment decisions at a time of future incapacity, yet in clinical practice their wishes often are ignored. Examining the tension between incompetent patients' prior wishes and their current best interests as well as other challenges to advance directives, Robert S. Olick offers a comprehensive argument for favoring advance instructions during the dying process. He clarifies widespread confusion about the moral and legal weight of advance directives, and he prescribes changes in law, policy, and practice that would not only ensure that directives count in the care of the dying but also would define narrow instances when directives should not be followed. Olick also presents and develops an original theory of prospective autonomy that recasts and strengthens patient and family control. While focusing largely on philosophical issues the book devotes substantial attention to legal and policy questions and includes case studies throughout. An important resource for medical ethicists, lawyers, physicians, nurses, health care professionals, and patients' rights advocates, it champions the practical, ethical, and humane duty of taking advance directives seriously where it matters most-at the bedside of dying patients.
Crime fiction master Raymond Chandler's sixth novel featuring Philip Marlowe, the "quintessential urban private eye" (Los Angeles Times). In noir master Raymond Chandler's The Long Goodbye, Philip Marlowe befriends a down on his luck war veteran with the scars to prove it. Then he finds out that Terry Lennox has a very wealthy nymphomaniac wife, whom he divorced and remarried and who ends up dead. And now Lennox is on the lam and the cops and a crazy gangster are after Marlowe.
Mr. Monk and Philosophy is a carefully and neatly organized collection of eighteen chapters divided into exactly six groups of precisely three chapters each. Drawing on a wide range of philosophers—from Aristotle and Diogenes, to Siddhartha Gautama and St. Thomas Aquinas, to David Hume and Karl Popper—the authors ask how Adrian Monk solves his cases, why he is the way he is, how he thinks, and what we can learn from him. Some of the authors suggest Monk is a kind of tragic hero, whose flaws help us live out and expunge the fear and anxiety we all experience; that he is more than just his personality or memories, but something more individual and indefinable; and that his most distinctive traits are not the traits that make him a detective, but those that make him a friend. His most notable trait is the dedication he shows to his late wife, Trudy. Other authors explore how Monk encounters the world, arguing that his genius comes not from logic or reasoning, but from his ability to see his surroundings in a pre-conceptualized way; that there isn’t as much distance between his rational beliefs about crimes and evidence and his irrational phobic beliefs as there might seem; and that his phobias have themselves made him approach himself and the world as something to be overcome. Just how does Mr. Monk come to his conclusions? Does he use inductive, deductive, or abductive reasoning? Is he dependent on a false notion of the law of noncontradiction? Is it possible that his reasoning might have more to do with constructing harmonious stories than it does with evidence, causes, or insights? Some contributors ponder Monk's name and what it means given his views on religion. Some authors argue that Mr. Monk's approach to the world is fundamentally similar to that of medieval monastic orders; that his rituals and deductive ‘dancing’ show how he exhibits a kind of shamanism; and that he acts in accordance with the Bodhisattva ideal, bringing others to enlightenment through circumstances and by accident, even though he has no such intention or goal. In one chapter, the author asks how the character Monk is related to other similar characters, arguing that Monk and House are closely related characters, each based on the conflict between reason and emotion which exemplifies the motif of the “troubled genius;” that Monk and House both pursue ethical practices and goals even as they fail at the everyday face-to-face ethics of normal social interactions; and that great detectives all, through their flaws, help us to understand and forgive ourselves for our flaws. And finally, there are several chapters in which the authors consider Monk from the psychologist’s perspective, discussing how Monk’s relationship with Trudy, while having unhealthy codependent elements, demonstrates some important aspects of successful romantic partnerships; how laughter plays a difficult role in mental illness, and the difficult position that the show and therapists are placed in when having to treat seriously disorders that are both tragic and comic; and how, from a psychoanalytic perspective, Monk’s inability to mourn shows us why we both reject and are drawn towards death. In the words of author D. E. Wittkower, "In order to be sure that the reader is able to enjoy the book, every chapter will have an even number of words. You’ll thank me later."
New York Times bestselling author of The Prodigal Prophet Timothy Keller—whose books have sold millions of copies to both religious and secular readers—explores one of the most difficult questions we must answer in our lives: Why is there pain and suffering? Walking with God through Pain and Suffering is the definitive Christian book on why bad things happen and how we should respond to them. The question of why there is pain and suffering in the world has confounded every generation; yet there has not been a major book from a Christian perspective exploring why they exist for many years. The two classics in this area are When Bad Things Happen to Good People by Rabbi Harold S. Kushner, which was published more than thirty years ago, and C. S. Lewis’s The Problem of Pain, published more than seventy years ago. The great secular book on the subject, Elisabeth Ku¨bler-Ross’s On Death and Dying, was first published in 1969. It’s time for a new understanding and perspective, and who better to tackle this complex subject than Timothy Keller? As the pastor of Redeemer Presbyterian Church in Manhattan, Timothy Keller is known for the unique insights he shares, and his series of books has guided countless readers in their spiritual journeys. Walking with God through Pain and Suffering will bring a much-needed, fresh viewpoint on this important issue.

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