RJ has another tough day at school and again at home but learns that sharing and teamwork are two beneficial skills. Includes audio book read by award-winning author Julia Cook.
RJ's having another bad day His teacher wants him to work with bossy Bernice, messy Frankie and Norma (who just sits and picks her nose) on a report about Egyptian mummies. After a frustrating school day with his team, RJ goes home to find only one biscuit left in the jar - and his mum makes him share it with his sister! With the help of his coach, RJ learns that working as a team and sharing are skills needed not just on the football field, but in school and at home too!
Any teacher with students who squabble when they need to share or who have trouble working on group assignments can use the creative ideas in this book to bring more cooperation and caring to the classroom. This guide offers everything teachers need: instructions, lists of materials when needed, activity sheets, homework ideas, and suggestions on variations and extensions. Reproducible activity sheets and praise coupons (in full color!) are included on a CD-ROM.
My Story about Asking for Permission and Making an Apology! RJ feels a lot happier when he says he’s sorry, and he learns that asking for permission will mean fewer trips to the time-out chair!
It doesn't matter is RJ hears compliments or constructive feedback, he is never sure how to respond. With guidance from his family, RJ learns why feedback, even when it's difficult to accept, is information he can use to become a better person.
With his mother’s help, RJ learns that his problems happen because he doesn’t listen or pay attention to directions from her, his school principal, teachers, or even his friends. Author Julia Cook’s book shows RJ as well as all K-6 readers the steps to the fundamental social skills of listening and following instructions. When RJ learns to use these skills the right way, he has the best day of his life! This book is the first in the BEST ME I Can Be! series to teach children social skills that can make home life happier and school more successful. The book includes tips for parents and educators on how to effectively teach listening and following instructions skills to kids.
After her sister explains the meaning of empathy to her, Emily decides to pay closer attention to the struggles those closest to her endure.
RJ is struggling in math class and many of his assignments are missing or incomplet. With help he discovers how to stay organized so he doesn't have to do things over and over again.
RJ’s mouth is getting him into a lot of trouble. A rude comment at school earned him a detention. An insensitive remark at home earned him a scolding and made his sister cry. RJ doesn’t realize his words are wrong. He thinks he’s just offering feedback. It’s time RJ starts using a social filter when he speaks. With help from his parents, he learns he doesn’t have to verbalize every thought that pops into his head. In fact, sometimes the less said the better!
Wendell Flutz's room isn't a mess. It's a total pigsty. But Wendell's mother can't get him to clean it up. Wendell doesn't think the mess is so awful. In fact, he doesn't even mind it when one day he discovers a real pig sitting on his bed. Full color.
Meet Wilbur, who won't wash his hands after going to potty; Wilma, who waits too long and sometimes doesn't make it in time; and Freddie, who's afraid to flush.
Mmm, Yoko's mom has packed her favorite for lunch today—sushi! But her classmates don't think it looks quite so yummy. "Ick!" says one of the Franks. "It's seaweed!" They're not even impressed by her red bean ice cream dessert. Of course, Mrs. Jenkins has a plan that might solve Yoko's problem. But will it work with the other children in class? Now in paperback for the first time, this tender story from Rosemary Wells demonstrates the author's uncanny understanding of the pleasures and pains of an ordinary school day.
George's day gets off to a bad start when he wakes up sleepy and misses breakfast, but after getting on the energy bus, George's realizes that he can control his attitude in order to overcome bullies and other challenges.
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A red-lipped batfish waddles across the sea floor on its fins, searching for small sea creatures to eat. Other animals may fly or glide, or jet-propel themselves to get around. These creatures come equipped with legs, wings, or tentacles, and they often move from place to place in surprising ways. In the latest eye-catching escape into the kingdom of Animalia, Caldecott Honor-winning team Jenkins and Page show how animals roll, fly, walk, leap, climb, swim and even flip! This fascinating and fun illustrated nonfiction melds science, art, biology, and the environment together in a detailed and well-researched book about how animals move in our world today.
In The Five Dysfunctions of a Team Patrick Lencioni once again offers a leadership fable that is as enthralling and instructive as his first two best-selling books, The Five Temptations of a CEO and The Four Obsessions of an Extraordinary Executive. This time, he turns his keen intellect and storytelling power to the fascinating, complex world of teams. Kathryn Petersen, Decision Tech's CEO, faces the ultimate leadership crisis: Uniting a team in such disarray that it threatens to bring down the entire company. Will she succeed? Will she be fired? Will the company fail? Lencioni's utterly gripping tale serves as a timeless reminder that leadership requires as much courage as it does insight. Throughout the story, Lencioni reveals the five dysfunctions which go to the very heart of why teams even the best ones-often struggle. He outlines a powerful model and actionable steps that can be used to overcome these common hurdles and build a cohesive, effective team. Just as with his other books, Lencioni has written a compelling fable with a powerful yet deceptively simple message for all those who strive to be exceptional team leaders.
When his best friend Conrad dumps him to hang out with the new cool kid in school, Mike demonstrates how a real best friend is supposed to act when Conrad gets a dose of his own medicine.
Becoming is better than being. (Ages 4-8) Hi, Im Bubble Gum Brain. I like to chew on my thoughts, flex, bend and stretch my brain, and expand the way I think! I make great mistakes that help me learn. Im Brick Brain. With me, things are the way they areand theyre probably not going to change much. I am the way I amand thats just how it is. Meet Bubble Gum Brain and Brick Brain: two kids with two VERY different mindsets. Bubble Gum Brain likes to have fun adventures, learn new things, and doesnt worry about making great mistakes. Brick Brain is convinced that things are just fine the way they are and theres not much he can do to change them, so why try? When Bubble Gum Brain shows Brick Brain how to peel off his wrapper, Brick Brain begins to realize just how much more fun schooland life can be! This creative story teaches children (and adults) the valuable lesson that becoming is better than being, which can open the door to a whole new world of possibilities! Softcover, 32 pages.
Are your employees like a synchronized "V" of geese in flight-sharing goals and taking turns leading? Or are they more like a herd of buffalo-blindly following you and standing around awaiting instructions? If they're like buffalo, their passivity and lack of initiative could doom your company. In How I Learned to Let My Workers Lead, you'll discover how to transform buffalo into geese-by reshaping organizational systems and redefining employees' expectations about what it takes to succeed. Since 1922, Harvard Business Review has been a leading source of breakthrough management ideas-many of which still speak to and influence us today. The Harvard Business Review Classics series now offers readers the opportunity to make these seminal pieces a part of your permanent management library. Each highly readable volume contains a groundbreaking idea that continues to shape best practices and inspire countless managers around the world-and will have a direct impact on you today and for years to come.
Groups of children show how cooperation and teamwork are beneficial in sports, community service, school projects and other activities.

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