Die AutorInnen aus der Humangeographie und Soziologie leisten einen Beitrag zur raumbezogenen qualitativen Sozialforschung, indem sie in kritischer Reflexion auf den spatial turn die soziale Welt erforschen und interpretieren. Einer schlagwortartig vorgebrachten Renaissance des Raumes in den Sozial- und Kulturwissenschaften werden konkrete qualitativ-empirische und theoretisch-konzeptionelle Arbeiten gegenübergestellt, die einen eigenständigen, raumreflektierten Zugang zur Thematik bieten. Die AutorInnen verfolgen zwei Ziele: Zum einen geht es um die Überwindung von „just-do-it“-Ansätzen in der (raumbezogenen) Methodologie. Zum anderen wird deutlich, dass eine eingehende methodologische Reflexion kein redundanter Aspekt ist oder einen lässlichen Arbeitsschritt darstellt, sondern entscheidender Bestandteil qualitativer Forschungslogik sein muss. Gefordert ist hierfür eine Debatte sowohl über die theoretischen Grundlagen einer solchen Positionierung, als auch die Diskussion ihrer praktischen Umsetzungen in der empirischen Forschung. Die AutorInnen demonstrieren, dass mit ‚Raum‘ qualitativ verfahren werden kann und die Sensibilität hinsichtlich relationaler und praxeologischer Raumbezüge in der qualitativen Sozialforschung gestärkt werden kann.
"Body Knowledge and Curriculum" examines student understandings of body knowledge in the context of creating and interrogating visual art and culture. It illustrates a six-month research study conducted in an alternative secondary school in a large urban city. During the research project, students created a number of visual art works using a diversity of material explorations as a means to think through the body as a process of exchange and as a bodied encounter. The book engages with feminist theories of touch and inter-embodiment, questioning the materiality and lived experiences of the body in knowledge production, in order to provoke different ways of theorizing self/other relations in teaching and learning. This volume is important because it explores the ways in which youth understand the complex, textured, and often contradictory discourses of body knowledge, and seeks to intentionally create alternative pedagogical and curricular practices to ones that subscribe to a healthy body model. Additionally, enacting educational research as living inquiry, this book is an exemplar of the arts-based methodology, a/r/tography. "Body Knowledge and Curriculum" is a valuable text for courses in curriculum theory, art education, qualitative research methodologies, visual culture and pedagogies, and feminist theory. Appropriate for advanced undergraduate students, pre-service teacher education students, and graduate students, the book provides an interdisciplinary investigation into body research.
In this book, editors Karen E. Waldron and Robert Friedman have assembled a collection of essays that study the interconnections between literature and the environment to theorize literary ecology. The disciplinary perspectives in these essays allow readers to comprehend places and environments, and to represent, express, or strive for that comprehension through literature. Contributors to this volume explore the works of several authors, including Gary Snyder, Karen Tei Yamashita, Rachel Carson, Terry Tempest Williams, Chip Ward, and Mary Oliver. Other essays discuss such topics as urban fiction as a model of literary ecology, the geographies of belonging in the work of Native American poets, and the literary ecology of place in “new” nature writing. Investigating texts for the complex interconnections they represent, this book suggests what such texts might teach us about the interconnections of our own world.
From postcards and paintings to photography and film, tourism and visual culture have a long-standing history of mutual entanglement. For centuries art has inspired many an intrepid traveller, and tourism provides an insatiable market for indigenous art, 'authentic' or otherwise. This book explores the complex association between tourism and visual culture throughout history and across cultures. How has tourism been linked to images of colonial expansion? Why are we so intrigued by 'lost' places, such as Tutankhamun's tomb or Machu Picchu, South America's lost city of the Incas? What is the relationship between art, tourism and landscape preference? What role did commercial tourist photographers play in the imagination of Victorian Britain? Drawing upon examples from across the globe, this exciting new contribution to a popular subject illustrates how tourism and visual culture intersect with one another and in the process become contested ground.
Being with A/r/tography is a collection of essays that explain and exemplify the arts-based research methodology called a/r/tography. Edited by four scholars who are artists, researchers, and teachers (a/r/tographers), this book is a methodology book for practitioners in arts-based educational research. In addition to an introductory essay which contextualizes and theorizes the methodological framework of a/r/tography, the book is divided into three main thematic sections that are integral to a/r/tographical research: (1) self-study and autobiography; (2) communities of a/r/tographic practice; (3) ethics and activism. The book concludes with a consideration of issues related to assessment, validity, and interpretation. Being with A/r/tography will be an excellent core text in graduate courses that focus on arts-based educational research, as well as a valuable text in pre-service teacher education programs. The book will also be significant for qualitative research courses in all the social sciences and the health sciences, including communication studies, nursing, counseling psychology, and arts therapy. The book provides a clear and comprehensive introduction to a/r/tography. Even though a/r/tography as a research methodology is relatively new in the scholarly field, Being with A/r/tography spells out how scholarly practitioners who are artists and researchers and teachers have been pursuing this kind of research for a long time.
The book offers an investigation into travel narratives and the gendered dynamics of journalism and travel in the German-speaking countries during the Weimar Republic (1919-1933). The individual contributions of women writers and journalists and their cumulative output reshaped the genre of travel writing by focusing on women’s lives in different parts of the globe. They also altered journalism in terms of readership, ethics, gendered voice, and publishing. Four fascinating travel texts written by women are introduced and analized. Gender, class, ethnicity, race, work, professionalism, journalism, and cultural places are major themes. What powers moved these women around the globe? Where did these women journalists and writers go? By what means? What have they seen and described in their travel reports? How their texts reflect circulating now and then theories? How were their travels related to the rising nationalism in Germany of the Weimar period? How do they speak to us today? The author Svoboda Dimitrova-Moeck raises these and many other questions in this book.
Talking at Trena's is an ethnography conducted in a bar in an African American, middle-class neighborhood on Chicago's southside. May's work focuses on how the mostly black, working- and middle-class patrons of Trena's talk about race, work, class, women, relationships, the media, and life in general. May recognizes tavern talk as a form of social play and symbolic performace within the tavern, as well as an indication of the social problems African Americans confront on a daily basis. Following a long tradition of research on informal gathering places, May's work reveals, though close description and analysis of ethnographic data, how African Americans come to understand the racial dynamics of American society which impact their jobs, entertainment--particularly television programs--and their social interactions with peers, employers, and others. Talking at Trena's provides a window into the laughs, complaints, experiences, and strategies which Trena's regulars share for managing daily life outside the safety and comfort of the tavern.
"This book is a valuable contribution to the creation of a more critical and theoretically diverse approach to early childhood policy and practice. Through many vivid examples and a varied cast-list of authors, both academics and practitioners, it shows the potential of this approach for pedagogical work in early childhood institutions and the education of the early childhood workforce." Professor Peter Moss, Institute of Education, University of London, UK. “In the era of No Child Left Behind in the U.S., you might think that the landscape of educational research and practice has been transformed into a row of ‘scientific’ models and unvarying curricular scripts. Nicola Yelland's volume will persuade you that, in contrast, the landscape in early childhood education is varied and full of unconventional angles. The authors examine virtually every significant aspect of curricular practice and postmodernist theory, while challenging readers to be skeptics themselves – to engage with risky ideas on the way to transformative actions.” Celia Genishi, Professor of Education, Teachers College, Columbia University, USA. This book challenges long-established beliefs about early childhood education. It offers readers the opportunity to think about the aspects of their profession that are fundamental to providing effective and equitable educational opportunities for young children in the 21st century. Well-known contributors explore issues that are not only ‘critical’ in terms of being fundamental to early childhood education, but also ‘critical’ in that they present alternative ideas and use frameworks that are not traditional to the field. Organized in three parts, the book considers: Contemporary views of early childhood education and teaching The rethinking of early childhood practices The emergence of new technologies and multiliteracies The chapters in the book focus on aspects of early childhood education that have for a long time been accepted as truisms, or have been too hard to deal with and thus often ignored. For example, they include a consideration of issues that range from examining play that might be sexual in focus or learning how to cope with traumatic events in young children’s lives, to the ways in which popular culture and new literacies impact on what young children are interested in and how they can be engaged in learning with information and communications technology. Essential reading for students in all early childhood studies programmes, as well as early childhood practitioners who want to engage in more reflective practices around their work. Contributors Yarrow Andrew, Chelsea Bailey, Mindy Blaise, Elizabeth Brooker, Sheralyn Campbell, Gaile Cannella, Richard Johnson, Anna Kilderry, Jackie Marsh, Jeanette Rhedding Jones, Leonie Rowan, Sharon Ryan, Jonathan Silin, Jennifer Sumsion, Daniel Walsh, Nicola Yelland
With the current emphases on standards and evidence-based learning, it's time to revisit the question of whether standards liberate or stifle excellence in arts education. Assessment in Arts Educationexamines the pressing issues that educators everywhere and at all levels face as they make determinations about progress and achievement in the arts. Assessment in Arts Educationcritiques the application of standards in arts education and the extent to which benchmarks and attainment levels are practically and educationally sensible. It opens up an interdisciplinary discussion on arts-education assessment and provides helpful advice for thinking about assessment and evaluation. Leaders in drama, music, dance, and the visual arts detail how they've navigated the issues around assessment and tackled tough questions such as: How do assessment models shape teaching in the arts? How much guidance should standards provide for arts educators? Who benefits from national and local assessment standards in the arts? What contributions have standards made to the teaching of the creative arts? Meet standards and assessment head on. Read Assessment in Arts Educationand find evidence not only of how your students think and learn, but of how the entire community of arts educators has considered and acted on the demands of these educational times.

Best Books