Following its publication in 1974, Grant Gilmore's compact portrait of the development of American law from the eighteenth century to the mid-twentieth century became a classic. In this new edition, the portrait is brought up to date with a new chapter by Philip Bobbitt that surveys the trajectory of American law since the original publication. Bobbitt also provides a Foreword on Gilmore and the celebrated lectures that inspired The Ages of American Law. "Sharp, opinionated, and as pungent as cheddar."—New Republic "This book has the engaging qualities of good table talk among a group of sophisticated and educated friends—given body by broad learning and a keen imagination and spiced with wit."—Willard Hurst
The May 2014 issue of The Yale Law Journal features new articles and essays on law and legal theory by internationally recognized scholars. Contents include: • Article, "Illegitimate Borders: Jus Sanguinis Citizenship and the Legal Construction of Family, Race, and Nation," by Kristin Collins • Article, "Legitimacy and Federal Criminal Enforcement Power," by Lauren M. Ouziel • Feature, "The Age of Consent," by Philip C. Bobbitt • Review, "Judging Justice on Appeal," by Marin K. Levy • Note, "The Growth of Litigation Finance in DOJ Whistleblower Suits: Implications and Recommendations," by Mathew Andrews • Note, "Reducing Inequality on the Cheap: When Legal Rule Design Should Incorporate Equity as Well as Efficiency," by Zachary Liscow • Note, "Domestic Violence Asylum After Matter of L-R-," by Jessica Marsden • Comment, "Beating Blackwater: Using Domestic Legislation to Enforce the International Code of Conduct for Private Military Companies," by Reema Shah This quality ebook edition features linked notes, active Contents, active URLs in notes, and proper Bluebook formatting. This May 2014 issue is Volume 123, Number 7.
Gifts: A Study in Comparative Law is the first broad-based study of the law governing the giving and revocation of gifts ever attempted. Gift-giving is everywhere governed by social and customary norms before it encounters the law and the giving of gifts takes place largely outside of the marketplace. As a result of these two characteristics, the law of gifts provides an optimal lens through which to examine how different legal systems engage with social practice. The law of gifts is well-developed both in the civil and the common laws. Richard Hyland's study provides an excellent view of the ways in which different civil and common law jurisdictions confront common issues. The legal systems discussed include principally, in the common law, those of Great Britain, the United States, and India, and, in the civil law, the private law systems of Belgium and France, Germany, Italy, and Spain. Professor Hyland also serves a critique of the dominant method in the field, which is a form of functionalism based on what is called the praesumptio similitudinis, namely the axiom that, once legal doctrine is stripped away, developed legal systems tend to reach similar practical results. His study demonstrates, to the contrary, that legal systems actually differ, not only in their approach and conceptual structure, but just as much in the results.
Noch nie konnten so viele Menschen wie heute ihre Meinung auf der ganzen Welt verbreiten. Internet und Globalisierung haben eine neue Epoche der Redefreiheit möglich gemacht, gleichzeitig provozieren sie neue kulturelle und religiöse Konflikte. Müssen wir rassistische Kommentare auf Facebook hinnehmen? Darf Satire den Propheten Mohammed verhöhnen? 2011 hat Timothy Garton Ash eine Debatte angestoßen, seitdem diskutieren Teilnehmer aus der ganzen Welt die Frage, wie wir in Zukunft vernünftig unsere Standpunkte austauschen, wie wir das Recht auf Redefreiheit genauso wie die Würde Andersdenkender sichern können. Es ist der Stoff für sein neues Buch: Ein Standardwerk zur Redefreiheit im 21. Jahrhundert.
Includes entries for maps and atlases.
Includes, beginning Sept. 15, 1954 (and on the 15th of each month, Sept.-May) a special section: School library journal, ISSN 0000-0035, (called Junior libraries, 1954-May 1961). Also issued separately.

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