This is a collection of texts on prayer, taken from Greek and Russian sources. The spiritual teaching of the Orthodox Church appears here in its classic and traditional form, but expressed in unusually direct and vivid language. The Art of Prayer is concerned in particular with the most frequently used and best loved of all Orthodox prayers - the Jesus Prayer. It deals also with the general question 'What is Prayer?', with the different degrees of prayer from ordinary oral prayer to unceasing prayer of the heart, with the dangers of illusion and discouragement, and the need for seclusion and inner peace.
The Philokalia is an important collection of writings by Fathers of the Eastern Church dating from the fourth to the fourteenth century. It exists in three versions: the Greek, complied in the eighteenth century; the Slavonic; and the Russian. The Russian text, translated by Bishop Theophan the Recluse in the nineteenth century, and consisting of five volumes (with which a sixth is sometimes associated), is the most complete of all three versions. It is the Russian text that has been used in translating into English this selection, which presents a range of Philokalia writings concerning the Jesus Prayer.
This second volume on Eastern Christian spirituality amplifies in depth the final two chapters of the earlier The Spirituality of the Christian East: A Systematic Handbook (1986). Like Cassian in writing his Conferences, Fr. Spidlik does not advocate any particular pattern of prayer, but sets out faithfully to collect and share the teachings of generations of eastern monks and spiritual writers. While adapting his work to the standards of modern research and treating subjects systematically, he remains within the eastern Christian tradition of 'positive' theology, aware that Eastern Christians have never tired of pointing out the great danger that rational concepts, the products of aristotelian logic, may all too easily replace the spiritual vision which is given only to those who are pure of heart.
“Norris Chumley traverses a spiritual landscape unfamiliar to most Westerners. . . . Take this book and read. Even better, read this book and accept its invitation to pray.” —Diana Butler Bass, author of A People's History of Christianity Norris Chumley presents a lavishly illustrated companion to the PBS documentary Mysteries of the Jesus Prayer. Readers can follow Chumley on a pilgrimage through the holiest sites of the early Christian world as he searches for modern-day practitioners of the ancient Eastern mystical tradition and its most sacred prayer: "Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, a sinner." This beautifully illustrated volume includes black-and-white and full-color images of the author's travels through Eastern Europe, including rare pictures from visits to holy sites where photographers are only rarely granted access.
With an introduction by Metropolitan Anthony of Sourozh, The Way of a Pilgrim presents one of Russia's greatest spiritual classics of Christian truth in an unpretentious literary prose of genuine beauty. An unknown pilgrim of the mid-nineteenth century tells his story of wandering through Russia and Siberia, from one holy place to another, in search of the way of prayer. R. M. French's superb translation conveys the charm of the original as well as brilliantly conveying the spiritual truths of the gospel, which are never bound to or owned by a particular culture. In the much-loved sequel, The Pilgrim Continues His Way, the narrator shares more of his story. He describes his journeyings among the holy places of Russia and his challenging encounters with holy people, the desire still burning within him to discover deeper experiences of prayer and draw closer to the heart of God.
Intended to teach Christians of the Orthodox Church and other denominations to practice the invocation of the Name of Jesus, also called "Jesus Prayer."
St. Paul clearly states: "Let this mind be in you which was also in Christ Jesus..." (Phil 2:5.) How do we acquire this Mind of Christ and where is it to be found? For the Orthodox Christian, salvation is the acquisition of this Mind of Christ which is to be found in the Church. This acquisition moves us from the image of God to the likeness of God; through our obedience to this call we begin to know God and this knowledge is eternal life (John 17:3). This small book hopes to begin to answer how acquiring the Mind of Christ is possible and why it is necessary in our lives today.
This work is a revised and expanded version of a book that has appeared in several languages. It focuses on themes central to Eastern Christian worship and spiritual life. The first three chapters provide insights on death, bereavement and resurrection in Christ; and repentance. Chapters four and five invite the reader into the world of desert ascetics and hesychast monks. Combining schoarly rigor with practical counsels on prayer, Bishop Ware makes the wealth of this traditonal accessible to today's Christians. The next three chapters concern personal vocation, martyrdom, spiritual fatherhood and the strange path of the fool for Christ's sake. There follows brief essays on the theology of time and the spiritual purposes of higher education. The final chapters is a challenging discussion of Origen and SS Gregory of Nyssa, Isaac the Syrian and Silouan the Athonite, and in coversation with them asks, dare we hope for the salvation of all.
Morning and evening prayers, communion prayers, selected troparia and prayers for various occasions.
First published in 1979.

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