Celebrates ocean waves through photographs and text that includes a description of the lifecycle of waves, anecdotes from sailors and surfers, and a metaphysical interpretation of waves
Stunning full-color photographs capture the transformative power, beauty, and many faces of the ocean wave, from a quiet trickle across tropical sand to a wild slam of storm surf against an Oregon cliff. 20,000 first printing.
"Provides comprehensive information on the process of waves forming"--Provided by publisher.
Examines the causes and effects of extreme waves, waves that can stretch 100-feet high and can pose a threat to large sea vessels and coastal areas.
Waves and tides, wind and storms, sea-level rise and shore erosion: these are the forces that shape our beaches, and beach lovers of all stripes can benefit from learning more about how these coastal processes work. With animation and clarity, The Beach Book tells sunbathers why beaches widen and narrow, and helps boaters and anglers understand why tidal inlets migrate. It gives home buyers insight into erosion rates and provides natural-resource managers and interested citizens with rich information on beach nourishment and coastal-zone development. And for all of us concerned about the long-term health of our beaches, it outlines the latest scientific information on sea-level rise and introduces ways to combat not only the erosion of beaches but also the decline of other coastal habitats. The more we learn about coastline formation and maintenance, Carl Hobbs argues, the better we can appreciate and cultivate our shores. Informed by the latest research and infused with a passion for its subject, The Beach Book provides a wide-ranging introduction to the shore, and all of us who love the beach and its associated environments will find it timely and useful.
Over a quarter of a century after its first publication, the great and simple wisdom in this book continues to influence women's lives. From the Hardcover edition.
A New York Times Bestseller A Forbes Top 10 Conservation and Environment Book of 2016 Read the sea like a Viking and interpret ponds like a Polynesian—with a little help from the “natural navigator”! In his eye-opening books The Lost Art of Reading Nature’s Signs and The Natural Navigator, Tristan Gooley helped readers reconnect with nature by finding direction from the trees, stars, clouds, and more. Now, he turns his attention to our most abundant—yet perhaps least understood—resource. Distilled from his far-flung adventures—sailing solo across the Atlantic, navigating with Omani tribespeople, canoeing in Borneo, and walking in his own backyard—Gooley shares hundreds of techniques in How to Read Water. Readers will: Find north using puddles Forecast the weather from waves Decode the colors of ponds Spot dangerous water in the dark Decipher wave patterns on beaches, and more!
Surfers, sailors, and anyone who loves the ocean will enjoy this visual exploration of the world's seas along its shores, including rip tides, swells, waves, and tsunamis. Tide is the vertical motion of water, something so subtle it is impossible to see with the naked eye. Inspired by his travels around the world's coastline in a camper van with his young family, William Thomson captures the cycles of the sea's movement, and intersperses his adventures surfing the waves and charting the tides. Throughout Tides and the Ocean are his graphic renderings of unusual tidal maps, as well as other forms of water movement, including rip, rapids, swell, stream, tide, wave, whirlpool, and tsunami. Tides and the Ocean explains how the tides surge when the moon and sun align with the earth; how ocean streams alternate direction every six hours (which is invaluable information for kayakers, paddle boarders, and fishermen); why skyscraper-sized tsunamis occur frequently in an Alaskan Bay; and the most deadly beach orientation for rip currents. Also emphasized throughout is the importance of keeping the world's oceans healthy and full of life. Published in time for beach travel, this large-format hardcover is ideal for anyone who knows and loves the sea, and who wants to understand, discover, surf, or sail it better.
Captures the thrill of the ocean's energy in amazing photographs, awesomertwork, and out-of-this-world facts.
Opening with a brief account of the life and work of the early 20th Century German-language poet Rainer Maria Rilke, the book then has its first major set piece, a lengthy and provocative selection from his prose writings on death, for him the most important topic of all. This is followed by a light-hearted account of Rilkes surprising popularity in the U. S. of A., even extending to Hollywood. A short chapter on Rilkes obsession with the scientific accuracy of his poetry and another on his poetic humor, prepare the reader for the second major set piece of the book --- a revealing look at his masterwork on death, the 860-line poem Duinese Elegies. The book closes with appendices on Rilke and god, translating Rilke, and a listing of the nearly 30 English translations of Duinese Elegies.
Get ready for a global journey like none other-a passionate enthusiast's exploration of waves that begins with a massive surfable cloud and ends with the majestic Pacific ocean, making side trips along the way to reveal the ups and downs of brain waves, radio waves, infrared waves, microwaves, shock waves, light waves, and much more.
Traces the recent discovery of physics-defying ocean waves at heights previously thought impossible, describing the efforts of the scientific community to understand the phenomenon, the pursuits of extreme surfers to ride these waves, and the destructivecapabilities of tsunamis.
In Tides: The Science and Spirit of the Ocean, writer, sailor, and surfer Jonathan White takes readers across the globe to discover the science and spirit of ocean tides. In the Arctic, White shimmies under the ice with an Inuit elder to hunt for mussels in the dark cavities left behind at low tide; in China, he races the Silver Dragon, a twenty-five-foot tidal bore that crashes eighty miles up the Qiantang River; in France, he interviews the monks that live in the tide-wrapped monastery of Mont Saint-Michel; in Chile and Scotland, he investigates the growth of tidal power generation; and in Panama and Venice, he delves into how the threat of sea level rise is changing human culture—the very old and very new. Tides combines lyrical prose, colorful adventure travel, and provocative scientific inquiry into the elemental, mysterious paradox that keeps our planet’s waters in constant motion. Photographs, scientific figures, line drawings, and sixteen color photos dramatically illustrate this engaging, expert tour of the tides.
This is a three-volume selection of classical papers by Michael Longuet-Higgins, who for many years has been a leading researcher in the fast-developing field of physical oceanography. Some of these papers were first published in scientific journals or in conference proceedings that are now difficult to access. All the papers are characterized by the novelty of their content, and the clarity of their style and exposition. The papers are quite varied in their approach. They range from basic theory and new computational methods to laboratory experiments and field observations. An overall feature is the frequent comparison between theory and experiment and the constant attention to practical applications. Among the many advances and achievements to be found in these three volumes are: the now generally accepted solution to the longstanding problem of how oceanic microseisms can be generated in deep water or near steep coastlines; a theoretical explanation of the strong drifting near the bottom in shallow water; the first introduction of a boundary-integral technique for calculating free surface flows; simple analytic expressions for the form and time-development of plunging breakers; and so on. The book will be of particular interest to advanced students in ocean engineering; also more generally to fluid dynamicists and physical oceanographers concerned with the interaction of the ocean with the atmosphere and with sandy shorelines.
Waves in Oceanic and Coastal Waters describes the observation, analysis and prediction of wind-generated waves in the open ocean, in shelf seas, and in coastal regions with islands, channels, tidal flats and inlets, estuaries, fjords and lagoons. Most of this richly illustrated book is devoted to the physical aspects of waves. After introducing observation techniques for waves, both at sea and from space, the book defines the parameters that characterise waves. Using basic statistical and physical concepts, the author discusses the prediction of waves in oceanic and coastal waters, first in terms of generalised observations, and then in terms of the more theoretical framework of the spectral energy balance. He gives the results of established theories and also the direction in which research is developing. The book ends with a description of SWAN (Simulating Waves Nearshore), the preferred computer model of the engineering community for predicting waves in coastal waters.
National Book Award Winner and New York Times Bestseller: Explore earth’s most precious, mysterious resource—the ocean—with the author of Silent Spring. With more than one million copies sold, Rachel Carson’s The Sea Around Us became a cultural phenomenon when first published in 1951 and cemented Carson’s status as the preeminent natural history writer of her time. Her inspiring, intimate writing plumbs the depths of an enigmatic world—a place of hidden lands, islands newly risen from the earth’s crust, fish that pour through the water, and the unyielding, epic battle for survival. Firmly based in the scientific discoveries of the time, The Sea Around Us masterfully presents Carson’s commitment to a healthy planet and a fully realized sense of wonder. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Rachel Carson including rare photos and never-before-seen documents from the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Yale University.
A Silent Spring for oceans, written by "the Rachel Carson of the fish world" (The New York Times) Who can forget the sense of wonder with which they discovered the creatures of the deep? In this vibrant hymn to the sea, Callum Roberts—one of the world’s foremost conservation biologists—leads readers on a fascinating tour of mankind’s relationship to the sea, from the earliest traces of water on earth to the oceans as we know them today. In the process, Roberts looks at how the taming of the oceans has shaped human civilization and affected marine life. We have always been fish eaters, from the dawn of civilization, but in the last twenty years we have transformed the oceans beyond recognition. Putting our exploitation of the seas into historical context, Roberts offers a devastating account of the impact of modern fishing techniques, pollution, and climate change, and reveals what it would take to steer the right course while there is still time. Like Four Fish and The Omnivore’s Dilemma, The Ocean of Life takes a long view to tell a story in which each one of us has a role to play.
The seventy-fifth anniversary edition of the classic book about Cape Cod, "written with simplicity, sympathy, and beauty" (New York Herald Tribune) A chronicle of a solitary year spent on a Cape Cod beach, The Outermost House has long been recognized as a classic of American nature writing. Henry Beston had originally planned to spend just two weeks in his seaside home, but was so possessed by the mysterious beauty of his surroundings that he found he "could not go." Instead, he sat down to try and capture in words the wonders of the magical landscape he found himself in thrall to: the migrations of seabirds, the rhythms of the tide, the windblown dunes, and the scatter of stars in the changing summer sky. Beston argued that, "The world today is sick to its thin blood for the lack of elemental things, for fire before the hands, for water, for air, for the dear earth itself underfoot." Seventy-five years after they were first published, Beston's words are more true than ever.

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