In The Book, Alan Watts provides us with a much-needed answer to the problem of personal identity, distilling and adapting the Hindu philosophy of Vedanta. At the root of human conflict is our fundamental misunderstanding of who we are. The illusion that we are isolated beings, unconnected to the rest of the universe, has led us to view the “outside” world with hostility, and has fueled our misuse of technology and our violent and hostile subjugation of the natural world. To help us understand that the self is in fact the root and ground of the universe, Watts has crafted a revelatory primer on what it means to be human—and a mind-opening manual of initiation into the central mystery of existence.
Betreten Sie eine bisher verschlossene Welt. Tauchen Sie ein in Liebe und Leidenschaft, Glück und Unglück, Verrat und Verbannung. Nehmen Sie teil am geheimen Leben und Schicksal der untreuen Königinnen und ihrer Liebhaber – von Eleanor von Aquitanien bis Diana, Prinzessin von Wales. (Dieser Text bezieht sich auf eine frühere Ausgabe.)
»Das Erste, was du dir vergegenwärtigen sollst, ist: Du wirst nie verschwinden oder sterben, weil du nie geboren wurdest. Du hast immer als Bewusstsein existiert und wirst immer als Bewusstsein existieren. Du gehst nirgendwohin und kommst von nirgendwo zurück. Du bist einfach. Du bist das Selbst, du bist Allgegenwärtigkeit.« Auf verschiedenste Weise, aus verschiedenster Perspektive sagt uns Robert Adams immer wieder nur dies. So eindringlich, so klar, so direkt, dass der Teil in uns, der diese tiefe Wahrheit schon immer wusste, in Resonanz kommt mit seinen Worten. Alles Überflüssige fällt ab. Die reine Wahrheit bleibt: »Du bist unendlich, unvergänglich, selbstleuchtend, selbstexistierend. Du bist ohne Anfang und Ende. Die Welt und ihre Manifestationen können dich nicht länger zum Narren halten. Du kannst die Quelle fühlen, weil du die Quelle bist. Alles ist gut.« Robert Adams ist revolutionär in seiner Direktheit. Sein Körper starb 1997. Die Wahrheit seiner Worte wird jeden Tag neu geboren, in uns, die wir sie lesen und uns von ihnen ergreifen und wandeln lassen.
In this new edition of his acclaimed autobiography — long out of print and rare until now — Alan Watts tracks his spiritual and philosophical evolution. A child of religious conservatives in rural England, he went on to become a freewheeling spiritual teacher who challenged Westerners to defy convention and think for themselves. Watts's portrait of himself shows that he was a philosophical renegade from early on in his intellectual life. Self-taught in many areas, he came to Buddhism through the teachings of Christmas Humphreys and D. T. Suzuki. Told in a nonlinear style, In My Own Way combines Watts's brand of unconventional philosophy with wry observations on Western culture and often hilarious accounts of gurus, celebrities, and psychedelic drug experiences. A charming foreword by Watts's father sets the tone of this warm, funny, and beautifully written story. Watts encouraged readers to “follow your own weird” — something he always did himself, as this remarkable account of his life shows.
Mark Watts compiled this book from his father's extensive journals and audiotapes of famous lectures he delivered in his later years across the country. In three parts, Alan Watts explains the basic philosophy of meditation, how individuals can practice a variety of meditations, and how inner wisdom grows naturally.
Alan Watts introduced millions of Western readers to Zen and other Eastern philosophies. But he is also recognized as a brilliant commentator on Judeo-Christian traditions, as well as a celebrity philosopher who exemplified the ideas — and lifestyle — of the 1960s counterculture. In this compilation of controversial lectures that Watts delivered at American universities throughout the sixties, he challenges readers to reevaluate Western culture's most hallowed constructs. Watts treads the familiar ground of interpreting Eastern traditions, but he also covers new territory, exploring the counterculture's basis in the ancient tribal and shamanic cultures of Asia, Siberia, and the Americas. In the process, he addresses some of the era's most important questions: What is the nature of reality? How does an individual's relationship to society affect this reality? Filled with Watts's playful, provocative style, the talks show the remarkable scope of a philosopher at his prime, exploring and defining the sixties counterculture as only Alan Watts could.
Glück ist ganz einfach. Und jeder kann es lernen. Ganz im Augenblick leben, das ist der Schlüssel. Wie das geht - im Alltag? Thich Nhat Hanh zeigt es, zugänglich, praktisch und übersichtlich. Wahres Glück, echte tiefe Freude, Herzensruhe lassen sich einüben. Hier und jetzt. Jeden Tag. Beim Gehen, Sitzen, Arbeiten, Essen - bei allem, was wir tun. Nicht nur der Alltag, das ganze Leben wird sich ändern.
Wildpfade - eine faszinierende Auswahl lebendiger Quellen und Wege, die Frauen in jüngerer Zeit bei ihrer Suche nach einem erfüllenden spirituellen Leben für sich entdeckt, wiederentdeckt oder auch gänzlich neu kreiert haben. Das Buch richtet sich an alle, die heute eine Spiritualität zu entwickeln und zu leben suchen, die nicht auf den Vorstellungen von Männern längst vergangener Zeiten und Kulturen basiert, sondern die mit ihrer eigenen menschlichen Erfahrung, ihrem eigenen Wissen, Fühlen und Erkennen hier und heute in Einklang steht. Es führt auf eine Reise der Inspiration, die mit so unterschiedlichen Bereichen bekannt macht wie der Naturreligion der Hexen und der transpersonalen Psychologie; eine Reise, die zurückführt bis in die Vorgeschichte und die in Form einer Einführung in die neue Frauen- oder auch Göttinspiritualität nach vorne blickt. Wildpfade stellt holistische, lebensbejahende, lebenfeiernde Visionen dieser Welt dar, lädt dazu ein, uns selbst und diese Existenz tiefer zu verstehen, intensiver und freudiger zu leben, mehr und mehr in uns selbst und in dieser ganzen Welt zu Hause zu sein und uns gleichzeitig unverbrüchlich im Zeitlosen verwurzelt zu wissen.
This classic series of essays represents Alan Watts's thinking on the astonishing problems caused by our dysfunctional relationship with the material environment. Here, with characteristic wit, a philosopher best known for his writings and teachings about mysticism and Eastern philosophy gets down to the nitty-gritty problems of economics, technology, clothing, cooking, and housing. Watts argues that we confuse symbol with reality, our ways of describing and measuring the world with the world itself, and thus put ourselves into the absurd situation of preferring money to wealth and eating the menu instead of the dinner. With our attention locked on numbers and concepts, we are increasingly unconscious of nature and of our total dependence on air, water, plants, animals, insects, and bacteria. We have hallucinated the notion that the so-called external world is a cluster of objects separate from ourselves, that we encounter it, that we come into it instead of out of it. Originally published in 1972, Does It Matter? foretells the environmental problems that arise from this mistaken mind-set. Not all of Watts's predictions have come to pass, but his unique insights will change the way you look at the world.
A car crashes, and Maggie Kast, at the peak of a modern dance career, loses a three-year-old daughter. Raised without religion and now mired in grief, she senses a persistent connection to the little girl, a love somehow more powerful than the brute fact of death. This awareness leads her, over three years, to the Catholic Church. After the accident, her marriage is greatly stressed by the entrance of religion into married life, and she and her husband each accuse the other of being too religious or too secular at various times. Despite conflict, dialogue keeps the marriage intimate and vital. Following study of liturgy at Catholic Theological Union, she teaches and tours sacred dance nationally and internationally, exploring the arts as a spiritual path. Moving forward and looking back at once, she discovers early hints of religious experience in childhood celebrations, encounters with art, and marriage. Her husband dies. Now a single parent of a ten-year-old and a developmentally disabled teenager, as well as college-aged sons, she continues her search.

Best Books