This book reflects the wide range of current scholarship on Roman law, covering private, criminal and public law.
This companion examines all aspects of Roman history and civilization from the founding of the republic in 509 BC to the crossing of the Rubicon in 49 BC, by which Julius Ceasar precipitated the civil war against Pompey that led first to his dictatorship & subsequently to the Augustan empire.
This Cambridge Companion gives a comprehensive introduction to the age of the emperor Constantine, a man whose strong personality is evident in the development of the Roman Empire during the period of his rule, and whose own personal development often ran alongside that of the empire. Divided into five sections dealing with political history, religion, social and economic history, art, and foreign relations, each chapter examines the intimate interplay between a powerful personality and his world. The second edition contains minor corrections, updated footnotes and a brief summary of new publications on the reign.
Rome was the largest city in the ancient world. As the capital of the Roman Empire, it was clearly an exceptional city in terms of size, diversity and complexity. While the Colosseum, imperial palaces and Pantheon are among its most famous features, this volume explores Rome primarily as a city in which many thousands of men and women were born, lived and died. The thirty-one chapters by leading historians, classicists and archaeologists discuss issues ranging from the monuments and the games to the food and water supply, from policing and riots to domestic housing, from death and disease to pagan cults and the impact of Christianity. Richly illustrated, the volume introduces groundbreaking new research against the background of current debates and is designed as a readable survey accessible in particular to undergraduates and non-specialists.
This book introduces the Age of Justinian, the last Roman century and the first flowering of Byzantine culture. Dominated by the policies and personality of emperor Justinian I (527–565), this period of grand achievements and far-reaching failures witnessed the transformation of the Mediterranean world. In this volume, twenty specialists explore the most important aspects of the age including the mechanics and theory of empire, warfare, urbanism, and economy. It also discusses the impact of the great plague, the codification of Roman law, and the many religious upheavals taking place at the time. Consideration is given to imperial relations with the papacy, northern barbarians, the Persians, and other eastern peoples, shedding new light on a dramatic and highly significant historical period.
This Companion volume provides a comprehensive and interdisciplinary study of Greek law.
This book considers the great cultural and geopolitical changes in western Eurasia in the fifth century CE. It focuses on the Roman Empire, but it also examines the changes taking place in northern Europe, in Iran under the Sasanian Empire, and on the great Eurasian steppe. Attila is presented as a contributor to and a symbol of these transformations.
This Companion introduces Max Weber, one of the very greatest figures in the history of the social sciences.
This Companion offers an integrated introduction to the study of Jesus.
A comprehensive and authoritative account of one of the greatest and most prolific writers of classical antiquity.
Provides a unique panorama of this challenging area of Greek literature, combining literary perspectives with historical issues and material culture.
A Companion to Ancient Education presents a series of essays from leading specialists in the field that represent the most up-to-date scholarship relating to the rise and spread of educational practices and theories in the ancient Greek and Roman worlds. Reflects the latest research findings and presents new historical syntheses of the rise, spread, and purposes of ancient education in ancient Greece and Rome Offers comprehensive coverage of the main periods, crises, and developments of ancient education along with historical sketches of various educational methods and the diffusion of education throughout the ancient world Covers both liberal and illiberal (non-elite) education during antiquity Addresses the material practice and material realities of education, and the primary thinkers during antiquity through to late antiquity
In recent years, the debate on Romanisation has often been framed in terms of identity. Discussions have concentrated on how the expansion of empire impacted on the constructed or self-ascribed sense of belonging of its inhabitants, and just how the interaction between local identities and Roman ideology and practices may have led to a multicultural empire has been a central research focus. This volume challenges this perspective by drawing attention to the processes of identity formation that contributed to an imperial identity, a sense of belonging to the political, social, cultural and religious structures of the Empire. Instead of concentrating on politics and imperial administration, the volume studies the manifold ways in which people were ritually engaged in producing, consuming, organising, believing and worshipping that fitted the (changing) realities of empire. It focuses on how individuals and groups tried to do things 'the right way', i.e., the Greco-Roman imperial way. Given the deep cultural entrenchment of ritualistic practices, an imperial identity firmly grounded in such practices might well have been instrumental, not just to the long-lasting stability of the Roman imperial order, but also to the persistence of its ideals well into (Christian) Late Antiquity and post-Roman times.
Niccolò Machiavelli (1469–1527) is the most famous and controversial figure in the history of political thought and one of the iconic names of the Renaissance. The Cambridge Companion to Machiavelli brings together sixteen original essays by leading experts, covering his life, his career in Florentine government, his reaction to the dramatic changes that affected Florence and Italy in his lifetime, and the most prominent themes of his thought, including the founding, evolution, and corruption of republics and principalities, class conflict, liberty, arms, religion, ethics, rhetoric, gender, and the Renaissance dialogue with antiquity. In his own time Machiavelli was recognized as an original thinker who provocatively challenged conventional wisdom. With penetrating analyses of The Prince, Discourses on Livy, Art of War, Florentine Histories, and his plays and poetry, this book offers a vivid portrait of this extraordinary thinker as well as assessments of his place in Western thought since the Renaissance.
This volume introduces students of rabbinic literature to the range of historical and interpretative questions surrounding the rabbinic texts of late antiquity. The editors, themselves well-known interpreters of Rabbinic literature, have gathered an international collection of scholars to support students' initial steps in confronting the enormous and complex rabbinic corpus. Unlike other introductions to Rabbinic writings, the present volume includes approaches shaped by anthropology, gender studies, oral-traditional studies, classics, and folklore studies.
Through a series of incisive and insightful essays by accomplished scholars, this Companion offers readers a new window to the world of Ulysses.
2014 Readers' Choice Awards Honorable Mention Preaching's Preacher's Guide to the Best Bible Reference for 2014 (Scripture/Hermeneutics) From John H. Walton, author of the bestselling Lost World of Genesis One, and D. Brent Sandy, author of Plowshares and Pruning Hooks, comes a detailed look at the origins of scriptural authority in ancient oral cultures and how they inform our understanding of the Old and New Testaments today. Stemming from questions about scriptural inerrancy, inspiration and oral transmission of ideas, The Lost World of Scripture examines the process by which the Bible has come to be what it is today. From the reasons why specific words were used to convey certain ideas to how oral tradition impacted the transmission of biblical texts, the authors seek to uncover how these issues might affect our current doctrine on the authority of Scripture. "In this book we are exploring ways God chose to reveal his word in light of discoveries about ancient literary culture," write Walton and Sandy. "Our specific objective is to understand better how both the Old and New Testaments were spoken, written and passed on, especially with an eye to possible implications for the Bible s inspiration and authority."
Borkowski's Textbook on Roman Law is the leading textbook in the field of Roman law, and has been written with undergraduate students firmly in mind. The book provides an accessible and highly engaging account of Roman private law and civil procedure, with coverage of all key topics, including the Roman legal system, and the law of persons, property, and obligations. The author sets the law in its social and historical context, and demonstrates the impact of Roman law on our modern legal systems. For the fifth edition, Paul du Plessis has included references to a wide range of scholarly texts, to ground his judicious account of Roman law firmly in contemporary scholarship. He has also added examples from legal practice, as well as truncated timelines at the start of each chapter to illustrate how the law developed over time. The book contains a wealth of learning features, including chapter summaries, diagrams and maps. A major feature of the book is the inclusion throughout of extracts in translation from the most important sources of Roman law: the Digest and the Institutes of Justinian. Annotated further reading sections at the end of each chapter act as a guide to further enquiry. Online Resource Centre The book is accompanied by an extensive Online Resource Centre, containing the following resources: -Self-test multiple choice questions -Interactive timeline -Biographies of key figures -Glossary of Latin terms -Annotated web links -Original Latin versions of the extracts from the Digest and the Institutes of Justinian -Examples of textual analysis of Roman law texts -Guide to the literature and sources of Roman law

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