A reference guide to world literature in English includes information on writers, works, genres, and movements.
An A-Z work with concise entries on all aspects of literature in English.
An alphabetized volume on women writers, major titles, movements, genres from medieval times to the present.
A volume of new essays on Victorian themes, genres and authors, aimed at students and lecturers.
The Cambridge Guide to Children s Books in English is an alphabetised reference work providing a critical and appreciative overview of children s books written in English across the world. It gives due weight to the history of children s books from pre-Norman times to the present - respecting the canon but also recognising current developments in publishing practices and in children s own reading. In addition to the long established traditions of children s writing from Britain and the USA, the Guide covers the increasing range of successful children s books produced in Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Africa and India; and the exciting renaissances in children s books taking place in Ireland and South Africa. In acknowledging that a great deal of what children read has little to do with classrooms and not much to do with what is considered literary , the Guide contains entries on television, comics, annuals and the growing range of media texts.
A wide-ranging survey of the most important medieval authors and genres, designed for students of English.
The Cambridge History of the English Short Story is the first comprehensive volume to capture the literary history of the English short story. Charting the origins and generic evolution of the English short story to the present day, and written by international experts in the field, this book covers numerous transnational and historical connections between writers, modes and forms of transmission. Suitable for English literature students and scholars of the English short story generally, it will become a standard work of reference in its field.
Ideal for students, this collection of fifteen specially commissioned essays covers all aspects of Anglo-Saxon literature from 600-1066.
Reader's Guide Literature in English provides expert guidance to, and critical analysis of, the vast number of books available within the subject of English literature, from Anglo-Saxon times to the current American, British and Commonwealth scene. It is designed to help students, teachers and librarians choose the most appropriate books for research and study.
Brings together essays examining English literary culture in the Restoration and early eighteenth century, from Milton and Marvell to Pope and Montagu.
This comprehensive guide to literature in English is a source to the vast heritage of literature in the English language throughout the world. It ranges from Britain and Ireland to the US, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Africa, the Caribean and India.
This Companion offers readers an accessible survey of the historical and symbolic relationships between literature and the city.
This Companion provides an accessible overview of the contexts, periods, and subgenres of English-language short fiction outside of North America.
This book offers a variety of approaches to the topic of London in English literature from the Middle Ages to the present.
This text investigates the meaning of conditional protasis markers like Spanish si and English if from a pragmatic perspective instead of taking them to be used in hypothetical or uncertain situations only.
The Cambridge Companion to Chaucer is an extensively revised version of the first edition, which has become a classic in the field. This new volume responds to the success of the first edition and to recent debates in Chaucer Studies. Important material has been updated, and new contributions have been commissioned to take into account recent trends in literary theory as well as in studies of Chaucer's works. New chapters cover the literary inheritance traceable in his works to French and Italian sources, his style, as well as new approaches to his work. Other topics covered include the social and literary scene in England in Chaucer's time, and comedy, pathos and romance in the Canterbury Tales. The volume now offers a useful chronology, and the bibliography has been entirely updated to provide an indispensable guide for today's student of Chaucer.
The twentieth-century English novel encompasses a vast body of work, and one of the most important and most widely read genres of literature. Balancing close readings of particular novels with a comprehensive survey of the last century of published fiction, this Companion introduces readers to more than a hundred major and minor novelists. It demonstrates continuities in novel-writing that bridge the century's pre- and post-War halves and presents leading critical ideas about English fiction's themes and forms. The essays examine the endurance of modernist style throughout the century, the role of nationality and the contested role of the English language in all its forms, and the relationships between realism and other fictional modes: fantasy, romance, science fiction. Students, scholars and readers will find this Companion an indispensable guide to the history of the English novel.
Translation has been a crucial process in world culture over the past two millennia and more. In the English-speaking cultures many of the most important texts are translations, from Homer to Beckett, the Bible to Freud. Although recent years have seen a boom in translation studies, there has been no comprehensive yet convenient guide to this essential element of literature in English. Written by eminent scholars from many countries, the Oxford Guide to Literature in English Translation meets this need and will be essential reading for all students of English and comparative literature. It highlights the place of translation in our culture, encouraging awareness of the issues raised, making the translator more visible. Concentrating on major writers and works, it covers translations out of many languages, from Greek to Korean, from Swahili to Russian. For some works (e.g. Virgil's Aeneid) which have been much translated, the discussion is historical and critical, showing how translation has evolved over the centuries and bringing out the differences between versions. Elsewhere, with less familiar literatures, the Guide examines the extent to which translation has done justice to the range of work available. The Guide is divided into two parts. Part I contains substantial essays on theoretical questions, a pioneering outline of the history of translation into English, and discussions of the problems raised by specific types of text (e.g. poetry, oralliterature). The second, much longer, part consists of entries grouped by language of origin; some are devoted to individual texts (e.g. the Thousand and One Nights) or writers (e.g. Ibsen, Proust), but the majority offer a critical overview of a genre (e.g. Chinese poetry, Spanish Golden Age drama) or of a national literature (e.g. Hungarian, Scottish Gaelic). There is a selective bibliography for each entry and an index of authors and translators.
A unique introduction, guide and reference work for students and readers of Scottish literature from the pre-medieval period.

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