How did the books of the Bible come to be recognized as Holy Scripture? After nearly nineteen centuries the canon of Scripture still remains an issue of debate. Adept in both Old and New Testament studies, F. F. Bruce brings the wisdom of a lifetime of reflection and biblical interpretation to bear in addressing the criteria of canonicity, the canon within the canon, and canonical criticism.
This book is filled with background materials covering each of the books of the Bible along with charts and diagrams that will assist the reader in his studies of the Scriptures. --from publisher description
Since the early days of Christianity a tension has existed between the authority of the Bible and the authority of the Church. This has been further heightened by the question of Bible translation: How does the Word stand firm and yet continue to speak to a changing Church? Joseph Lienhard, a specialist in Early Christianity, examines the evolution of the Christian canon by casting this question against the life of the early Christians. Among the topics treated are the Christian use of Jewish Scriptures, the Catholic and Protestant Old Testaments, the emergence of the New Testament, the struggle for the right interpretation of the Scriptures, the problem of inspiration, and modern attempts to explain the Church's New Testament canon theologically. The book questions the use of historicist methods of interpretation and appeals to the Rule of Faith as the right norm for interpreting the Scriptures in the Church. Joseph T. Lienhard, SJ, earned his doctorate at the University of Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany) with two dissertations on Paulinus of Nola and Marcellus of Ancyra. His work is in patristics. He taught at Marquette University from 1975 to 1990, and since 1990 has been at Fordham University, where he is also chair of the department of theology. He has published Ministry in the Message of the Fathers of the Church series and other titles.
This book provides information from Church history concerning the recognition of the canonical status of the several books of the New Testament. Canonization was a long and gradual process of sifting among scores of gospels, epistles, and other books that enjoyed local and temporary authority - some of which have only recently come to light among the discoveries of Nag Hammadi. After discussing the external pressures that led to the fixing of the limits of the canon, the author gives sustained attention to Patristic evidence that bears on the development of the canon not only in the West but also among the Eastern Churches, including the Syrian, Armenian, Georgian, Coptic, and Ethiopian. Besides considering differences as to the sequence of the books in the New Testament, Dr Metzger takes up such questions as which form of text is to be regarded as canonical; whether the canon is open or closed; to what extent a canon should be sought within the canon; and whether the canon is a collection of authoritative books or an authoritative collection of books.
This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.
This volume contains the Proceedings of the 50th Colloquium Biblicum Lovaniense: the 40 contributions, written in English, French and German, focus on the canons of the Old and New Testament as well as those of the Bible as a whole. The theme is studied from a variety of historical, hermeneutical and biblical-theological points of view. Several contributions discuss the process that resulted in the canonical status of certain writings, or groups of writings, in particular, such as the Book of Psalms, Ezekiel, the Wisdom of Ben Sira, the Pauline corpus, Acts and the gospels.
English summary: A concise commentary and historical analysis of the Epistle of Barnabas, an early Christian document included in the Codex Sinaiticus (which otherwise contains canonical scriptures). German description: Der Barnabasbrief ist ein anonymer brieflich gerahmter Traktat uber die vollkommene Gnosis, die erst gottgehorsames Handeln im Glauben an Jesus Christus und Teilhabe an dem im Christusereignis exklusiv der Kirche verheiaenen und verburgten eschatologischen Heil ermoglicht. Er will anhand autoritativer Zeugnisse die christliche Identitat seiner Leser in Abgrenzung zu anderen Christen aufzeigen und sichern. In diesem Dienst stehen die Schriftauslegung, die Adaption einer Zwei-Wege-Lehre und die polemischen Tendenzen. Die Hochachtung von Schrift und judischer Tradition einerseits und deren Okkupation fur die Kirche und die gleichzeitige radikale Verwerfung von allem Judischen andererseits machen die Eigentumlichkeit und Fremdartigkeit dieser fruhchristlichen Schrift und zugleich den Reiz fur ihre Auslegung aus. Ferdinand R. Prostmeiers Auslegung ist der erste wissenschaftliche Kommentar zum Barnabasbrief seit 1920.
Drawing on a broad array of contributors, volume seven of the Scripture and Hermeneutics Series assesses the current state of canonical interpretation and uses that as a starting point for exploring ingredients in theological interpretation of the Bible today. Canon and Biblical Interpretation begins with a masterful examination of the canonical approach and the various criticisms that have been leveled against it. Additional chapters look at canonical interpretation in relation to different parts of the Bible, such as the Pentateuch, the Wisdom books, the Psalms, and the Gospels. Articles address such issues as canonical authority and the controversial relationship between canonical interpretation and general hermeneutics. A unique chapter explores the relationship between academic exegesis and lectio divina. Editors: • Craig Bartholomew • Robin Parry • Scott Hahn • Christopher Seitz • Al Wolters
An international group of prominent scholars explores the origins and formation of the biblical text and canon.
The Bible took shape over the course of centuries, and today Christian groups continue to disagree over details of its contents. The differences among these groups typically involve the Old Testament, as they mostly accept the same 27-book New Testament. An essential avenue for understanding the development of the Bible are the many early lists of canonical books drawn up by Christians and, occasionally, Jews. Despite the importance of these early lists of books, they have remained relatively inaccessible. This comprehensive volume redresses this unfortunate situation by presenting the early Christian canon lists all together in a single volume. The canon lists, in most cases, unambiguously report what the compilers of the lists considered to belong to the biblical canon. For this reason they bear an undeniable importance in the history of the Bible. The Biblical Canon Lists from Early Christianity provides an accessible presentation of these early canon lists. With a focus on the first four centuries, the volume supplies the full text of the canon lists in English translation alongside the original text, usually Greek or Latin, occasionally Hebrew or Syriac. Edmon L. Gallagher and John D. Meade orient readers to each list with brief introductions and helpful notes, and they point readers to the most significant scholarly discussions. The book begins with a substantial overview of the history of the biblical canon, and an entire chapter is devoted to the evidence of biblical manuscripts from the first millennium. This authoritative work is an indispensable guide for students and scholars of biblical studies and church history.
This work looks at the task of interpreting Scripture as "witnessing tradition," "authoritative canon," "inspired word," and "experienced revelation." The diversity of interpretive approaches implied by the use of these four models of Scripture is carried further by a methodological catholicity and openness within each of the four major divisions of the book. Throughout, Goldingay also continually moves toward the interpreter's final task- communication to others of what has been gained in interpretation.

Best Books