This is the third book in the moving and true story of what happened to the cats of Moon Cottage. Feline bereavement, reproduction, jealousy, passion, love, laughter, tenderness, wildlife in general and in particular village life in Cumbria are all discussed in Marilyn's much-loved honest style.
The definitive text of this American classic—reissued with an introduction by Edward Albee (Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and A Delicate Balance) and Williams' essay "Person-to-Person." Cat on a Hot Tin Roof first heated up Broadway in 1955 with its gothic American story of brothers vying for their dying father's inheritance amid a whirlwind of sexuality, untethered in the person of Maggie the Cat. The play also daringly showcased the burden of sexuality repressed in the agony of her husband, Brick Pollitt. In spite of the public controversy Cat stirred up, it was awarded the Pulitzer Prize and the Drama Critics Circle Award for that year. Williams, as he so often did with his plays, rewrote Cat on a Hot Tin Roof for many years—the present version was originally produced at the American Shakespeare Festival in 1974 with all the changes that made Williams finally declare the text to be definitive, and was most recently produced on Broadway in the 2003-04 season. This definitive edition also includes Williams' essay "Person-to-Person," Williams' notes on the various endings, and a short chronology of the author's life. One of America's greatest living playwrights, as well as a friend and colleague of Williams, Edward Albee has written a concise introduction to the play from a playwright's perspective, examining the candor, sensuality, power, and impact of Cat on a Hot Tin Roof then and now.
This title celebrates the joys and heartache of living with cats. The true story follows old, loyal and independent Septi, lord of his domain within Moon Cottage. The other being Otto, a tortoiseshell kitten, who must set out to win Septi over.
As a beautiful companion to the much loved THE MOON COTTAGE CATS VOLUME ONE, this lovely second volume is a must-read for anyone who delights in Marilyn Edwards' ability to bring to life her experiences with the feline friends she has shared her life with. Beautifully illustrated throughout by Peter Warner, the last two books in the series, THE CATS ON HUTTON ROOF and THE COACH HOUSE CATS discuss passion, love, laughter, tenderness and above all why cats matter.
'White Chin' is the story of a cat, abandoned by its owners and forced to live in the wild. He must learn to hunt, defend himself in the wild and avoid predators.
The author lovingly captures the details of her cats' behaviour and examines topics such as feline jealousy, emotional security and the degrees of affection a cat may feel for its human companion.
BONUS: This edition contains an excerpt from Lee Child’s Bad Luck and Trouble. In Lee Child’s astonishing new thriller, ex–military cop Reacher sees more than most people would...and because of that, he’s thrust into an explosive situation that’s about to blow up in his face. For the only way to find the truth—and save two innocent lives—is to do it the way Jack Reacher does it best: the hard way…. Jack Reacher was alone, the way he liked it, soaking up the hot, electric New York City night, watching a man cross the street to a parked Mercedes and drive it away. The car contained one million dollars in ransom money. And Edward Lane, the man who paid it, will pay even more to get his family back. Lane runs a highly illegal soldiers-for-hire operation. He will use any amount of money and any tool to find his beautiful wife and child. And then he’ll turn Jack Reacher loose with a vengeance—because Reacher is the best man hunter in the world. On the trail of a vicious kidnapper, Reacher is learning the chilling secrets of his employer’s past…and of a horrific drama in the heart of a nasty little war. He’s beginning to realize that Edward Lane is hiding something. Something dirty. Something big. But Reacher also knows this: he’s already in way too deep to stop now.
The relationship between Freddie Mercury and Jim Hutton evolved over several months in 1984 and 1985. Even when they first slept together Button had no idea who Mercury was, and when the star told him his name it meant nothing to him.;Hutton worked as a barber at the Savoy Hotel and retained his job and his lodgings in Sutton, Surrey, for two years after moving in with Mercury, and then worked as his gardener. He was never fully assimilated into Mercury's jet-setting lifestyle, nor did he want to be, but from 1985 until Mercury's death in 1991 he was closer to him than anyone and knew all Mercury's closest friends: the other members of Queen, Elton John, David Bowie, Phil Collins to name a few.;Ever present at the countless Sunday lunch gatherings and opulent parties, Hutton has a wealth of anecdotes about as well as a deep understanding of, Mercury's life. He also nursed Mercury through his terminal illness, often held him throughout the night in his final weeks, and was with him as he died. No one can tell the story of the last few years of Mercury's private life - the ecstasies and the agonies - more accurately or honestly than Jim Hutton.
An adventurous single woman who knew how to cook, twenty-three-year-old May Arkwright moved — alone — to the remote valleys of northern Idaho in 1883. She opened a one-table restaurant for the silver prospectors near Wallace, serving her homemade berry pies and hot dishes. Before long, she was a well-known part of the fledgling mining district. May, a large, outspoken woman who favored low-cut, brightly colored dresses, scandalized the “proper” women of town. But her self-confidence and ease with people helped her make important friends among the miners, merchants, and railroad men who ate at her table. After she met and married local train engineer Al Hutton, the two invested in a mine upstream from Wallace. After several long years they struck it rich and moved to Spokane, where May spent the rest of her life working on philanthropic projects that still affect residents of the Pacific Northwest to this day. As related through the skilled storytelling of Mary Barmeyer O’Brien, this larger-than-life woman’s story adds a compelling new element to the history of the West.
Just when the Strega-Borgias think it’s safe to relax in their ancestral castle . . . it isn’t. First their roof collapses, forcing them into the Auchenlochtermuchty Arms–the only local hotel that will accomodate three mythical beasts and one crocodile. Then Titus accidentally creates 500 tiny naked pink clones. And 500 tiny naked pink clones are not easy to manage. But not surprisingly, this isn’t the biggest Strega-Borgia dilemma–there’s also a few evil contractors plotting to destroy their home forever. Perhaps the miniature kilted warriors arising from the spilled magic potion can help. . . . From the Hardcover edition.
One of the greatest American dramatists of the 20th century, Tennessee Williams is known for his sensitive characterizations, poetic yet realistic writing, ironic humor, and depiction, of harsh realties in human relationship. His work is frequently included in high school and college curricula, and his plays are continually produced. Critical Companion to Tennessee Williams includes entries on all of Williams's major and minor works, including A Streetcar Named Desire, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, The Glass Menagerie, a novel, a collection of short stories, two poetry collections, and personal essays; places and events related to his works; major figures in his life; his literary influences; and issues in Williams scholarship and criticism. Appendixes include a complete list of Williams's works; a list of research libraries with significant Williams holdings; and a bibliography of primary and secondary sources.
This magnificent book presents a detailed portrait of the buildings, the landmarks and the scenery of the old county of Westmorland. First published in 1975 to mark the incorporation of the county into Cumbria, it has been in demand ever since as both a record of a lost county, as an informed and engaging record of one of the loveliest and least spoiled parts of Britain, where nature, culture and history have combined to leave a memorable and exhilarating legacy. Every single parish is included, with its notable buildings or landscapes mapped and illustrated, and its historical or other features of interest discussed and described. Though written "by an amateur, for amateurs" the author's deep knowledge of and close familiarity with the countryside pervade and illuminate the text and the two thousand line drawings.
The story of a drunk, a boy and a cat Billy O'Shannessy, once a prominent barrister, is now on the street where he sleeps on a bench outside the State Library. Above him on the window sill rests a bronze statue of Matthew Flinders' cat, Trim. Ryan is a ten-year-old, a near-street kid heading for the usual trouble. The two form an unlikely bond. Through telling Ryan the story of Flinders' circumnavigation of Australia as seen through Trim's eyes, Billy is drawn deeply into Ryan's life and into the Sydney underworld. A modern-day story of friendship and redemption by an internationally bestselling author. Stay in touch with all of Bryce's news on Facebook:facebook.com/BryceCourtenay
An anthropologist investigates the revolution of everyday life.
An all-you-need dictionary of ?spin,” with new and useful words for everyday and special occasions, by bestselling humor writers Henry Beard and Christopher Cerf.
With the release of a flurry of feature and TV films about his life and work, and the publication of new books looking at his correspondence, his boat and even his favorite cocktails, Ernest Hemingway is once again center stage of contemporary culture. There’s something about Papa that makes any retirement to the wings only fleeting. Now, in this concise and sparkling account of the life and work of America’s most storied writer, Clancy Sigal, himself a National Book Award runner-up, presents a persuasive case for the relevance of Ernest Hemingway to readers today. Sigal breaks new ground in celebrating Hemingway’s passionate and unapologetic political partisanship, his stunningly concise, no-frills writing style, and an attitude to sex and sexuality much more nuanced than he is traditionally credited with. Simply for the pleasure provided by a consummate story teller, Hemingway is as much a must-read author as ever. Though Hemingway Lives! will provide plenty that’s new for those already familiar with Papa’s oeuvre, including substantial forays into his political commitments, the women in his life, and the astonishing range of his short stories, it assumes no prior knowledge of his work. Those venturing into Hemingway’s writing for the first time will find in Sigal an inspirational and erudite guide.
This book traces Abigail's exodus out of her marriage in Florida, to resettlement in the dangerous downtown of a city an hour from her mother's home. With the help of her aging mother and father, whom she frequently despises, she escapes to an apparently more civilized city a little closer to home; finally, she settles into an apartment in a pleasant small town 10 minutes away from her mother and father. Her son stays with her parents. The journal collects posts from her 5 years of blogging her way through her travels. The style of the blogging, which forms a framework for the whole book, is a loose poetry that easily follows Abby's still distorted thoughts. The book includes some of Abby's most recent writing, like "California, a Pro-Life Novel," as well as short stories and poems from her past. These elements work together to tell a tale of love, betrayal, and redemption. In the end, optimism prevails through the darkness and hope, through Christian faith, triumphs over a lifetime of despair.

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