Plautus was the single greatest influence on Western comedy. Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors and Moliere's The Miser are two subsequent classics directly based on Plautine originals. Plautus himself borrowed from the Greeks, but his jokes, rapid dialogue, bawdy humour, and irreverent characterizations are the original work of an undisputed genius. The comedies printed here show him at his best, and professor Segal's translations keep their fast, rollicking pace intact, making these the most readable and actable versions available. His introduction considers Plautus' place in ancient comedy, examines his continuing influence, and celebrates his power to entertain.
'I thought you'd do what the common run of slaves normally do, cheating and tricking me because my son's having an affair.' Terence's comedies have provided plots and characters for comic drama from classical times to the present; the outstanding comic playwright of his generation at Rome, he has influenced authors from Molière and Wycherley to P. G. Wodehouse. Scheming slaves, parasites, prostitutes, pimps, and boastful soldiers populate his plays, which show love triumphing over obstacles of various kinds, and the problems that arise from ignorance, misunderstanding, and prejudice. Although they reflect contemporary tensions in Roman society, their insights into human nature and experience make them timeless in their appeal. Peter Brown's lively new translation does full justice to Terence's style and skill as a dramatist. ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.
Terence (?184-159 BC) was the outstanding comic playwright of his generation at Rome and one of the founding fathers of European comic drama. This new translation with introduction and explanatory notes aims to convey the liveliness of the plays as pieces written for the theatre.
PIERIDES IV, Series Editors: Sophia Papaioannou This volume examines interpretation as the original process of critical reception vis-a-vis Terence’s experimental comedies. The book, which consists of two parts, looks at Terence as both an agent and a subject of interpretation. The First Part (‘Terence as Interpreter’) examines Terence as an interpreter of earlier literary traditions, both Greek and Roman. The Second Part (‘Interpretations of Terence’) identifies and explores different expressions of the critical reception of Terence’s output. The papers in both sections illustrate the various expressions of originality and individual creative genius that the process of interpretation entails. The volume at hand is the first study to focus not only on the interpreter, but also on the continuity and evolution of the principles of interpretation. In this way, it directs the focus from Terence’s work to the meaning of Terence’s work in relation to his predecessors (the past literary tradition), his contemporaries (his literary antagonists, but also his audience), and posterity (his critical readers across the centuries).
This new modern-spelling edition of Shakespeare's The Comedy of Errors includes a full introduction by Charles Whitworth that discusses the probable occasion of its first performance in 1594, its multiple sources, and its uneven critical and theatrical history. A full text of Plautus's comedy Men�chmus, and extracts from Gesta Gragorum and the Geneva Bible are included in appendices.
Opera was invented at the end of the sixteenth century in imitation of the supposed style of delivery of ancient Greek tragedy, and, since then, operas based on Greek drama have been among the most important in the repertoire. This collection of essays by leading authorities in the fields of Classics, Musicology, Dance Studies, English Literature, Modern Languages, and Theatre Studies provides an exceptionally wide-ranging and detailed overview of the relationship between the two genres. Since tragedies have played a much larger part than comedies in this branch of operatic history, the volume mostly concentrates on the tragic repertoire, but a chapter on musical versions of Aristophanes' Lysistrata is included, as well as discussions of incidental music, a very important part of the musical reception of ancient drama, from Andrea Gabrieli in 1585 to Harrison Birtwistle and Judith Weir in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries.
Brings together the works of Classical comedy, with two early Greek plays: Aristophanes' Birds, and Menander's The Girl from Samos; and two Roman comic plays: Plautus' The Brothers Menaechmus and Terence's double love-plot, The Eunuch. Together, these four plays demonstrate the development of Classical comedy.
Menander was the founding father of European comedy. From Ralph Roister Doister to What the Butler Saw, from Henry Fielding to P. G. Wodehouse, the stock motifs and characters can be traced back to him.The greatest writer of Greek New Comedy, Menander (c.341-290 BC) wrote over one hundred plays but until the twentieth century he was known to us only by short quotations in ancient authors. Since 1907 papyri found in the sand of Egypt have brought to light more and more fragments, many substantial,and in 1958 the papyrus text of a complete play was published, The Bad-Tempered Man (Dyskolos) . His romantic comedies deal with the lives of ordinary Athenian families, and they are the direct ancestors not only of Roman comedy but also of English comedy from the Renaissance to the present day.This new verse translation is accurate and highly readable, providing a consecutive text with supplements based on the dramatic situation and surviving words in the damaged papyri.
Thomas Dekker: The Shoemaker's HolidayGeorge Chapman, Ben Jonson, John Marston: Eastward Ho!Ben Jonson: Every Man In His HumourThomas Middleton and Thomas Dekker: The Roaring GirlOxford English Drama offers plays from the sixteenth to the early twentieth centuries in selections that make available both rarely printed and canonical works. The texts are freshly edited using modern spelling. Critical introductions, wide-ranging annotation, and informative bibliographiesilluminate the plays' cultural contexts and theatrical potential for reader and performer alike.'The series should reshape the canon in a number of significant areas. A splendid and imaginative project.' Professor Anne Barton, Cambridge University
Offers newly edited texts of five of the British playwright's works, including the great farcial comedy "The Importance of Being Earnest."
Dion Boucicault: London AssuranceW. S. Gilbert: EngagedEdward Bulwer-Lytton: MoneyHenry James: The High BidOxford English Drama offers plays from the sixteenth to the early twentieth centuries in selections that make available both rarely printed and canonical works. The texts are freshly edited using modern spelling. Critical introductions, wide-ranging annotation, and informative bibliographiesilluminate the plays' cultural contexts and theatrical potential for reader and performer alike.'The series should reshape the canon in a number of significant areas. A splendid and imaginative project.' Professor Anne Barton, Cambridge University
A new blank verse translation of Dante's epic, complete with an authoritative Introduction, diagrams, maps, and notes.
This engaging book provides in-depth discussion of the various influences that an audience in 1607 would have brought to interpreting ‘Antony and Cleopatra’. How did people think about the world, about God, about sin, about kings, about civilized conduct? Learn about the social hierarchy, gender relationships, court corruption, class tensions, the literary profile of the time, the concept of tragedy – and all the subversions, transgressions, and oppositions that made the play an unsettling picture of a disintegrating world lost through passion and machination.
Englisch und deutsch. Übersetzt von Johanna Wange. »Sie ist mehr als modern; sie ist praktisch Science-Fiction«, schreibt der Guardian über Kate Tempest. Zu ihren Einflüssen zählen James Joyce und Wu-Tang Clan, Public Enemy und Virginia Woolf. Sie beherrscht den innigen Volksliedton ebenso wie Londons Straßenslang, wandelt virtuos zwischen lyrischer Tradition und Hip-Hop. Ihre Gedichte bemächtigen sich auf radikal heutige, politische Weise des Mythos von Teiresias, einer zweigeschlechtlichen Figur, von den Göttern geblendet und prophetisch begabt. In vier Teilen folgt der Zyklus dem Kind, dem Jüngling, der Frau und dem Mann, vermittelt eindrucksvoll, wie es ist, alt zu werden und »sehend«, dazu verurteilt, unserer neoliberalen Gesellschaft die Wahrheit zu sagen – und keiner hört zu. Lyrik-Empfehlung 2016 der Deutschen Akademie für Sprache und Dichtung, der Stiftung Lyrik Kabinett und der Literaturwerkstatt Berlin.
J M Synge was one of the key dramatists in the flourishing world of Irish literature at the turn of the century. This volume offers all of Synge's plays, which range from racy comedy to stark tragedy, all sharing a memorable lyricism. The introduction sets Synge's work in the context of the Irish literary movement, with special attention to his role as one of the founders of the Abbey Theatre and his work alongside W. B. Yeats and Lady Gregory. Includes: Riders to the Sea; The Shadow of the Glen; The Tinker's Wedding; The Well of the Saints; The Play of the Western World; Deirdre of the Sorrows

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