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Providing a well-rounded presentation of the constitution and evolution of civil rights in the United States, this book will be useful for students and academics with an interest in civil rights, race and the law. Abraham L Davis and Barbara Luck Graham's purpose is: to give an overview of the Supreme Court and its rulings with regard to issues of equality and civil rights; to bring law, political science and history into the discussion of civil rights and the Supreme Court; to incorporate the politically disadvantaged and the human component into the discussion; to stimulate discussion among students; and to provide a text that cultivates competence in reading actual Supreme Court cases.
Study of church and state in the United States is incredibly complex. Scholars working in this area have backgrounds in law, religious studies, history, theology, and politics, among other fields. Historically, they have focused on particular angles or dimensions of the church-state relationship, because the field is so vast. The results have mostly been monographs that focus only on narrow cross-sections of the field, and the few works that do aim to give larger perspectives are reference works of factual compendia, which offer little or no analysis. The Oxford Handbook of Church and State in the United States fills this gap, presenting an extensive, multidimensional overview of the field. Twenty-one essays offer a scholarly look at the intricacies and past and current debates that frame the American system of church and state, within five main areas: history, law, theology/philosophy, politics, and sociology. These essays provide factual accounts, but also address issues, problems, debates, controversies, and, where appropriate, suggest resolutions. They also offer analysis of the range of interpretations of the subject offered by various American scholars. This Handbook is an invaluable resource for the study of church-state relations in the United States.
Explores the history of free speech, focusing on the rights guaranteed by the First Amendment and why they are important.
While First Amendment doctrine treats religion as a human good, the state must not take sides on theological questions. Koppelman explains the logic of this uniquely American form of neutrality: why it is fair to give religion special treatment, why old (but not new) religious ceremonies are permitted, and why laws must have a secular purpose.
An examination of some important precedents in several areas of First Amendment law, as well as some recent examples of landmark challenges to and defenses of free speech rights.
Throughout American history, the government has used U.S. citizenship and immigration law to protect privileged groups from less privileged ones, using citizenship as a “legitimate” proxy for otherwise invidious, and often unconstitutional, discrimination on the basis of race. While racial discrimination is rarely legally acceptable today, profiling on the basis of citizenship is still largely unchecked, and has in fact arguably increased in the wake of the September 11 terror attacks on the United States. In this thoughtful examination of the intersection between American immigration and constitutional law, Victor C. Romero draws our attention to a “constitutional immigration law paradox” that reserves certain rights for U.S. citizens only, while simultaneously purporting to treat all people fairly under constitutional law regardless of citizenship. As a naturalized Filipino American, Romero brings an outsider's perspective to Alienated, forcing us to look at constitutional immigration law from the vantage point of people whose citizenship status is murky (either legally or from the viewpoint of other citizens and lawmakers), including foreign-born adoptees, undocumented immigrants, tourists, foreign students, and same-gender bi-national partners. Romero endorses an equality-based reading of the Constitution and advocates a new theoretical and practical approach that protects the individual rights of non-citizens without sacrificing their personhood.
The Supreme Court A to Z offers accessible information about the Supreme Court, including its history, traditions, organization, dynamics, and personalities. The entries in The Supreme Court A to Z are arranged alphabetically and are extensively cross-referenced to related information. This volume also has a detailed index, reference materials on Supreme Court nominations, a seat chart of the justices, the U.S. Constitution, online sources of decisions, and a bibliography to help simplify research. The fifth edition of The Supreme Court A to Z has been thoroughly updated to incorporate coverage of significant new cases and recent changes on the bench and includes more than 350 alphabetized entries. Presented in an engaging reader-friendly design, this edition includes: - Biographies of recently appointed Associate Justices Elena Kagan and Sonia Sotomayor - Updated entries on key issues and concepts, including abortion, campaigns and elections, civil rights, class action, due process, freedom of the press, retired justices, reapportionment and redistricting, school desegregation, and war powers - New entries on criminal law and media and the court, which highlights the Court's online presence - This timely resource also includes updated seat charts of the justices, online sources for finding decisions, and a selected bibliography The Supreme Court A to Z is part of CQ Press's five-volume American Government A to Z series.
This comprehensive, alphabetical encyclopedia of more than 300 easy-to-read entries is the first resource for anyone who wants reliable information or background material on the significant decisions of the Supreme Court, the history of the Court, the justices (every justice is profiled), the powers of the Court, and how the institution has evolved from its origins to the present. Outstanding Academic Book
Looks at the influence of Supreme Court justices, cases, and decisions on American society
Provides over 800 entries on people and events important to the civil rights struggle, and cites court cases which show a progression of civil rights
This comprehensive, alphabetical encyclopedia of 300+ easy-to-read essays is the perfect first resource for anyone who wants reliable information or background material on the significant decisions of the Supreme Court, the history of the Court, the justices, the powers of the Court, and how the institution has evolved from its origins to the present.
''''Revised and updated to include coverage of significant new cases and the recent changes on the bench, this valuable research tool is the definitive source for information on the Court, its justices, and its impact on American democracy. Written in understandable language for general audiences, The Supreme Court A to Z provides biographies of past and present justices, the history of important cases, and explanations of constitutional principles and legal concepts. ''''Important additions to the fourth edition include:''''New biographies of recently appointed Chief Justice John G. Roberts and Associate Justice Samuel A. Alito''''Updated entries on key issues and concepts including capital punishment, confirmation process, habeas corpus, judicial activism, separation of powers, and many more''''New entries on intellectual property and international law''''With over 350 entries arranged in encyclopedic A-to-Z format, this updated ready reference is a must-have resource for school, academic, public, and special libraries.''''
An overview of key Supreme Court decisions describes each case's decision, background, important figures, and impact on society.
Here are the landmark decisions that have shaped American life, described by some of America's most eminent legal scholars. The new edition contains more than 450 entries on major cases, including 53 new entries on the latest landmark rulings. This outstanding guide serves as an excellent introduction to the work of the Court from the late eighteenth century to the present day.
An alphabetically arranged, illustrated guide to the Supreme Court, including biographical articles on all the justices, summaries and analysis of key decisions and major cases, and definitions of legal terms.
Ideas and information that can enhance education about the constitutional rights of individuals in U.S. history and the current system of government in the United States are included in this book. The resource guide contains nine distinct parts dealing with aspects of learning and teaching about the Bill of Rights in both elementary and secondary schools. Part I, Background Papers, features four essays for teachers on the origins, enactment, and development of the federal Bill of Rights. A fifth paper discusses the substance and strategies for teaching Bill of Rights topics and issues. Part II, A Bill of Rights Chronology, is a timetable of key dates and events in the making of the federal Bill of Rights. Part III, Documents, includes 11 primary sources about the origins, enactment, and substance of the federal Bill of Rights. Part IV, Lessons on the Bill of Rights, consists of nine exemplary lessons. The remaining five parts include: Papers in ERIC on Constitutional Rights; Select Annotated Bibliography of Curriculum Materials; Periodical Literature on Teaching the Bill of Rights; Bill of Rights Bookshelf for Teachers; and Directory of Key Organizations and Persons. (DB)

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