Travis Hirschi is one of the most cited criminologists of the twentieth century. His work has provoked controversy and heated debates about the causes of crime, proper research methods, and the most effective policies to prevent and control crime. Known as a spokesperson for social control theory, Hirschi always ties his ideas to the mode of investigation and the mode of investigation to substantive concerns. Theoretical contributions and research methodology have been twin driving forces throughout his career. This book contains representative selections of Hirshi's work over many years. It is remarkable how little is known about Hirschi's life and career. John H. Laub's introduction combines a discerning account of Hirschi's life and work, accompanied by an interview with the author. Laub's volume covers various topics: methodological issues; principles of casual analysis; criteria of causality; longitudinal research on crime; rules and the study of deviant behavior; correlations between crime and delinquency; control theory of delinquency; intelligence, causes, and prevention of delinquency; family structure and crime; theory of crime; crime and criminality; deviance; white collar crime; and juvenile justice systems. Now available in paperback, this is an invaluable text for courses in criminology, as well as a valuable addition to professional libraries.
The Origins of American Criminology is an invaluable resource. Both separately and together, these essays capture the stories behind the invention of criminology’s major theoretical perspectives. They preserve information that otherwise would have been lost. There is urgency to embark on this reflective task given that the generation that defined the field for the past decades is heading into retirement. This fine volume insures that their life experiences will not be forgotten. The volume shows criminology to be a human enterprise. Ideas are not driven primarily—and often not at all—by data. Theories are not invented solely as part of the scientific process; they are not inevitable. American criminology’s great theories most often precede the collection of data; they guide and produce empirical inquiry, not vice versa. Theoretical paradigms are shaped by a host of factors—scholars’ assumptions about the world drawn from their social constructs, disciplinary content and ideology, cognitive environments found in specific universities and the field’s scholarly networks, and, quirks in a person’s biography. The volume demonstrates that humanity is what makes theory possible. Diverse experiences—when we were born, where we have lived, the unique trajectories of our personal life courses, the disciplines and academic places we have ended up—allow individual scholars to see the world differently.
For a free 30-day online trial to this title, visit www.sagepub.com/freetrial This two-volume set is designed to serve as a reference source for anyone interested in the roots of contemporary criminological theory. Drawing together a team of international scholars, it examines the global landscape of all the key theories and the theorists behind them, presenting them in a context needed to understand their strengths and weaknesses. The work provides essays on cutting-edge research as well as concise, to-the-point definitions of key concepts, ideas, schools, and figures. Topics include contexts and concepts in criminological theory, the social construction of crime, policy implications of theory, diversity and intercultural contexts, conflict theory, rational choice theories, conservative criminology, feminist theory, and more. Key ThemesThe Classical School of CriminologyThe Positivist School of CriminologyEarly American Theories of CrimeBiological and Biosocial Theories of CrimePsychological Theories of CrimeThe Chicago School of CriminologyCultural and Learning Theories of CrimeAnomie and Strain Theories of Crime and DevianceControl Theories of CrimeLabeling and Interactionist Theories of CrimeTheories of the Criminal SanctionConflict, Radical, and Critical Theories of CrimeFeminist and Gender-Specific Theories of CrimeChoice and Opportunity Theories of CrimeMacro-Level/ Community Theories of CrimeLife-Course and Developmental Theories of CrimeIntegrated Theories of CrimeTheories of White-Collar and Corporate CrimeContemporary Gang TheoriesTheories of Prison Behavior and InsurgencyTheories of Fear and Concern About Crime
By focusing on key ideas in both criminology and criminal justice, this book brings a new and unique perspective to understanding critical research in criminology and criminal justice -- heretofore, the practice has been to separate criminology and criminal justice. However, given their interconnected nature, this book brings both together cohesively. In going beyond simply identifying and discussing key contributions and their effects by giving students a broader socio-political context for each key idea, this book concretely conceptualizes the key ideas in ways that students will remember and understand.
Offers projects with a criminal theme, including a crime scene carpet, see-behind sunglasses, and a garter belt shiv cozy.
This book brings together prominent investigators to provide a comprehensive guide to doing life course research, including an “inside view” of how they designed and carried out influential longitudinal studies. Using vivid examples, the contributors trace the connections between early and later experience and reveal how researchers and graduate students can discover these links in their own research. Well-organized chapters describe the best and newest ways to: *Use surveys, life records, ethnography, and data archives to collect different types of data over years or even decades. *Apply innovative statistical methods to measure dynamic processes that result in improvement, decline, or reversibility in economic fortune, stress, health, and criminality. *Explore the micro- and macro-level explanatory factors that shape individual trajectories, including genetic and environmental interactions, personal life history, interpersonal ties, and sociocultural institutions.
Joan McCord was one of the most-respected criminologists of her generation. Dr McCord was best known for her work on the Cambridge-Somerville Youth Study, the first large-scale, longitudinal experimental study in the field of criminology. This book collects together seminal essays.
Offering an extensive look into the lives and times of fifteen notable crime theorists, Criminological Thought: Pioneers Past and Present examines the people who have helped shape the discipline. Features fifteen criminological pioneers. Includes a systematic approach that focuses on one thinker per chapter. Offers an innovative work that places the theoretical perspective within a historical context.
Criminological Theory: The Essentials, Third Edition offers you a brief yet comprehensive overview of classic and contemporary criminologists and their theories. Putting criminological theory in context, acclaimed author Stephen G. Tibbetts examines policy implications brought about by theoretical perspectives to demonstrate to you the practical application of theories to contemporary social problems. New to the Third Edition: A new chapter dedicated entirely to feminist perspectives (Chapter 10) introduces you to feminist models of crime while underscoring the importance of examining the related research. Case studies that examine offender motives are now included to help you apply the theories discussed to interesting and memorable examples. Policy is now integrated into each section to allow you to see the practical policy implications of each theory. Coverage of critical topics has been expanded throughout to introduce you to important issues, such as the influence of employment on criminal behavior, the success of school programs in reducing delinquent behavior, and federal sentencing guidelines in regard to crack versus powder cocaine. Statistics, graphs, and tables have all been updated to demonstrate the most recent trends in criminology.
During the 1960s, traditional thinking about crime and its punishment, deviance and its control, came under radical attack. The discipline of criminology split into feuding factions, and various schools of thought emerged, each with quite different ideas about the nature of the crime problem and its solutions. These differences often took political form, with conservative, liberal, and radical supporters, and the resulting controversies continue to reverberate throughout the fields of criminology and sociology, as well as related areas such as social work, social policy, psychiatry, and law. Stanley Cohen has been at the center of these debates in Britain and the United States. This volume is a selection of his essays, written over the past fifteen years, which contribute to and comment upon the major theoretical conflicts in criminology during this period. Though associated with the "new" or radical criminology, Cohen has always been the first to point out its limitations particularly in translating its theoretical claims into real world applications. His essays cove a wide range of topics-political crime, the nature of individual responsibility, the implications of new theories for social work practice, models of crime used in the Third World, banditry and rebellion, and the decentralization of social control. Also included is a previously unpublished paper on how radical social movements such as feminism deal with criminal law. Many criminology textbooks present particular theories or research findings. This book uniquely reviews the main debates of the last two decades about just what the role and scope of the subject should be.
An essential guide to criminology, exploring the most infamous cases of all time, from serial killers to mob hits to war crimes and more. From Jack the Ripper to Jeffrey Dahmer, The Crime Book is a complete study of international true crime history that unpacks the shocking stories through infographics and in-depth research that lays out every key fact and detail. Examine the science, psychology, and sociology of criminal behavior, and read profiles of villains, victims, and detectives. See each clue and follow the investigation from start to finish, and study the police and detective work of each case. Find out how pirates, the Japanese yakuza, Chinese triads, and modern drug cartels operate around the world. Dive deep into the Black Dahlia murder investigation and follow other high-profile cases, including Lizzie Borden with her ax and the Patty Hearst kidnapping. Learn how media coverage changed through history, from the tragic assassination of President Abraham Lincoln to romanticizing Bonnie and Clyde's doomed fate to the kidnapping and murder of Charles Lindbergh's baby, which is considered the first international crime tabloid story. The Crime Book is a complete compendium for crime aficionados to add to their collection.
First Published in 2018. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an Informa company.
By articulating a general theory of crime and related behavior, the authors present a new and comprehensive statement of what the criminological enterprise should be about. They argue that prevalent academic criminology—whether sociological, psychological, biological, or economic—has been unable to provide believable explanations of criminal behavior. The long-discarded classical tradition in criminology was based on choice and free will, and saw crime as the natural consequence of unrestrained human tendencies to seek pleasure and to avoid pain. It concerned itself with the nature of crime and paid little attention to the criminal. The scientific, or disciplinary, tradition is based on causation and determinism, and has dominated twentieth-century criminology. It concerns itself with the nature of the criminal and pays little attention to the crime itself. Though the two traditions are considered incompatible, this book brings classical and modern criminology together by requiring that their conceptions be consistent with each other and with the results of research. The authors explore the essential nature of crime, finding that scientific and popular conceptions of crime are misleading, and they assess the truth of disciplinary claims about crime, concluding that such claims are contrary to the nature of crime and, interestingly enough, to the data produced by the disciplines themselves. They then put forward their own theory of crime, which asserts that the essential element of criminality is the absence of self-control. Persons with high self-control consider the long-term consequences of their behavior; those with low self-control do not. Such control is learned, usually early in life, and once learned, is highly resistant to change. In the remainder of the book, the authors apply their theory to the persistent problems of criminology. Why are men, adolescents, and minorities more likely than their counterparts to commit criminal acts? What is the role of the school in the causation of delinquincy? To what extent could crime be reduced by providing meaningful work? Why do some societies have much lower crime rates than others? Does white-collar crime require its own theory? Is there such a thing as organized crime? In all cases, the theory forces fundamental reconsideration of the conventional wisdom of academians and crimina justic practitioners. The authors conclude by exploring the implications of the theory for the future study and control of crime.
Based on Russell Schutt's bestselling text Investigating the Social World, this Third Edition of The Practice of Research in Criminology and Criminal Justice is the most comprehensive research methods text available to students in criminal justice and criminology. Specifically designed for criminal justice courses and programs, this innovative text uniquely helps to teach research design and techniques within the context of substantive criminology and criminal justice issues of interest to students and the field. With expanded coverage of topics like causation, ethics, and qualitative analysis, along with a comprehensive and one-of-a-kind ancillary package, the Third Edition is a text both students and instructors will appreciate.
A supplemental textbook that examines the self-control theory of crime from a range of perspectives, both supportive and critical.
Throughout the 20th century numerous explanations for crime and deviance have emerged that have been offered as better explanations than other theories and perspectives. Yet, the impact of criminological theorizing on public policy remained insignificant. In this situation Michael Gottfredson and Travis Hirschi presented their book A General Theory of Crime and suggested self-control theory. Their theory arrived on the scene with a 'make-up' of seriousness, objectivity and truth, which seemingly flattered politics since it was taken as to justify the status quo of the criminal justice system. Whereas the popularity of self-control theory has certainly sparked an enormous interest in the empirical examination of the theory, the amount of critique remained limited.The study "Beyond self-control" is a first attempt to remedy this situation. The author through theoretical analysis, works back to the logical presuppositions of self-control theory and assesses their validity in light of current data and understandings. This methodological endeavour, eventually, brings to light that Gottfredson and Hirschi's book on self-control theory contains more criminological wisdom than acknowledged by most scholars in criminology.
"This volume investigates the significant role qualitative research plays in expanding and refining our understandings of crime and justice. It features seventeen original essays that discuss the relationship between methodology and theory. The result is a theoretically engaged volume that explores the approaches of qualitative scholars in the collection and treatment of data in criminological scholarship.Among the key issues addressed in the volume are methodological rigor in qualitative research; movement between method, theory building, theoretical refinement and expansion; diversity of qualitative methodologies, from classic field research to contemporary innovations; and considerations of the future of qualitative criminological research.Qualitative research use has expanded rapidly in the last twenty years. This latest volume of Advances in Criminological Theory presents a cogent appraisal of qualitative criminology and the ways in which rigorous qualitative research contributes to theorizing about crime and justice."
Written by Peter Joyce, who is a current criminology lecturer and a leading researcher, Criminology - The Essentials is designed to give you everything you need to succeed, all in one place. It covers the key areas that students are expected to be confident in, outlining the basics in clear jargon-free English, and then providing added-value features like summaries of key books, and even lists of questions you might be asked in your seminar or exam. The book uses a structure that mirrors many university courses on criminology - starting with definitions of crime, then examining why people commit crime, and how crime can be prevented and detected. Later chapters hone in on the criminal justice system itself, examining the role of the police, the courts and prisons. This book is unique for its comparative approach to criminology, enabling students to understand criminology in the context of the UK, the US and further afield. Teach Yourself titles employ the 'Breakthrough method', which is designed specifically to overcome problems that students face. - Problem: 'I find it difficult to remember what I've read.'; Solution: this book includes end-of-chapter questions and summaries - Problem: 'Most books mention important other sources, but I can never find them in time.'; Solution: this book includes key texts and case studies are summarised, complete with fully referenced quotes ready to use in your essay or exam. - Problem: 'Lots of introductory books turn out to cover totally different topics than my course.'; Solution: this book is written by a current university lecturer who understands what students are expected to know.

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