Travis Hirschi is one of the most cited criminologists of the twentieth century. His work has provoked controversy and heated debates about the causes of crime, proper research methods, and the most effective policies to prevent and control crime. Known as a spokesperson for social control theory, Hirschi always ties his ideas to the mode of investigation and the mode of investigation to substantive concerns. Theoretical contributions and research methodology have been twin driving forces throughout his career. This book contains representative selections of Hirshi's work over many years. It is remarkable how little is known about Hirschi's life and career. John H. Laub's introduction combines a discerning account of Hirschi's life and work, accompanied by an interview with the author. Laub's volume covers various topics: methodological issues; principles of casual analysis; criteria of causality; longitudinal research on crime; rules and the study of deviant behavior; correlations between crime and delinquency; control theory of delinquency; intelligence, causes, and prevention of delinquency; family structure and crime; theory of crime; crime and criminality; deviance; white collar crime; and juvenile justice systems. Now available in paperback, this is an invaluable text for courses in criminology, as well as a valuable addition to professional libraries.
Updated Edition of a Best-Seller! Offering a rich introduction to how scholars analyze crime, Criminological Theory: Context and Consequences moves readers beyond a commonsense knowledge of crime to a deeper understanding of the importance of theory in shaping crime control policies. The Seventh Edition of the authors’ clear, accessible, and thoroughly revised text covers traditional and contemporary theory within a larger sociological and historical context. It includes new sources that assess the empirical status of the major theories, as well as updated coverage of crime control policies and their connection to criminological theory.
The Origins of American Criminology is an invaluable resource. Both separately and together, these essays capture the stories behind the invention of criminology’s major theoretical perspectives. They preserve information that otherwise would have been lost. There is urgency to embark on this reflective task given that the generation that defined the field for the past decades is heading into retirement. This fine volume insures that their life experiences will not be forgotten. The volume shows criminology to be a human enterprise. Ideas are not driven primarily—and often not at all—by data. Theories are not invented solely as part of the scientific process; they are not inevitable. American criminology’s great theories most often precede the collection of data; they guide and produce empirical inquiry, not vice versa. Theoretical paradigms are shaped by a host of factors—scholars’ assumptions about the world drawn from their social constructs, disciplinary content and ideology, cognitive environments found in specific universities and the field’s scholarly networks, and, quirks in a person’s biography. The volume demonstrates that humanity is what makes theory possible. Diverse experiences—when we were born, where we have lived, the unique trajectories of our personal life courses, the disciplines and academic places we have ended up—allow individual scholars to see the world differently.
For a free 30-day online trial to this title, visit www.sagepub.com/freetrial This two-volume set is designed to serve as a reference source for anyone interested in the roots of contemporary criminological theory. Drawing together a team of international scholars, it examines the global landscape of all the key theories and the theorists behind them, presenting them in a context needed to understand their strengths and weaknesses. The work provides essays on cutting-edge research as well as concise, to-the-point definitions of key concepts, ideas, schools, and figures. Topics include contexts and concepts in criminological theory, the social construction of crime, policy implications of theory, diversity and intercultural contexts, conflict theory, rational choice theories, conservative criminology, feminist theory, and more. Key ThemesThe Classical School of CriminologyThe Positivist School of CriminologyEarly American Theories of CrimeBiological and Biosocial Theories of CrimePsychological Theories of CrimeThe Chicago School of CriminologyCultural and Learning Theories of CrimeAnomie and Strain Theories of Crime and DevianceControl Theories of CrimeLabeling and Interactionist Theories of CrimeTheories of the Criminal SanctionConflict, Radical, and Critical Theories of CrimeFeminist and Gender-Specific Theories of CrimeChoice and Opportunity Theories of CrimeMacro-Level/ Community Theories of CrimeLife-Course and Developmental Theories of CrimeIntegrated Theories of CrimeTheories of White-Collar and Corporate CrimeContemporary Gang TheoriesTheories of Prison Behavior and InsurgencyTheories of Fear and Concern About Crime
Offering an extensive look into the lives and times of fifteen notable crime theorists, Criminological Thought: Pioneers Past and Present examines the people who have helped shape the discipline. Features fifteen criminological pioneers. Includes a systematic approach that focuses on one thinker per chapter. Offers an innovative work that places the theoretical perspective within a historical context.
Throughout the 20th century numerous explanations for crime and deviance have emerged that have been offered as better explanations than other theories and perspectives. Yet, the impact of criminological theorizing on public policy remained insignificant. In this situation Michael Gottfredson and Travis Hirschi presented their book A General Theory of Crime and suggested self-control theory. Their theory arrived on the scene with a 'make-up' of seriousness, objectivity and truth, which seemingly flattered politics since it was taken as to justify the status quo of the criminal justice system. Whereas the popularity of self-control theory has certainly sparked an enormous interest in the empirical examination of the theory, the amount of critique remained limited.The study "Beyond self-control" is a first attempt to remedy this situation. The author through theoretical analysis, works back to the logical presuppositions of self-control theory and assesses their validity in light of current data and understandings. This methodological endeavour, eventually, brings to light that Gottfredson and Hirschi's book on self-control theory contains more criminological wisdom than acknowledged by most scholars in criminology.
Fundamentals of Research in Criminology and Criminal Justice is a concise resource for understanding the multifaceted subject of research methods in the field of criminology and criminal justice. This book uniquely helps to teach research design and techniques within the context of substantive criminology and criminal justice issues of interest to students and the field. This is a briefer version of Ronet Bachman and Russell K Schutt ’s successful The Practice of Research in Criminology and Criminal Justice, written in a less formal style, with more concise examples drawn from everyday experience, and less coverage of complex or more rigorous methods. It is ideal for students who need to understand how criminal justice research is done and appreciate the results, but may never do research themselves in the professional lives.
Der Band bietet eine leicht zugängliche, umfassende vielseitige Einführung in die Geschichte der Psychologie und ihre wichtigsten Vertreter.

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