This book asks some hard questions about our changing world, and examines the policy opportunities that need to be grasped if we are to foster sustainable social foundations for the 21st century.
Human creativity has been one of the fundamental drivers of civilization and progress – solving immense problems, creating opportunities and overcoming enemies like no other force. Often it has baffled its skeptics by finding new and better resources, unexpected environmental technologies and genuinely amazing products that no one had predicted. However, like so many before it, Western civilization is now suffering from serious internal decay with its bloated public sectors, punitive taxes, over-regulation, marginalized citizens, stagnation, debt, unemployment and pessimism.
The concept of creative industries has developed considerable academic and policy momentum in the 21st century. There has been a connection identified between the rise of creative industries and the urbanisation of the world’s population, particularly in relation to the significance of cities as sites of cultural production and consumption. Much of the work on creative industries and cities, however, has drawn upon 'imagined geographies' about the relationship between creativity and place. This collection draws together contributions that critically appraise recent urban cultural policy discourses, as well as reflecting on the role of culture and creative industries in the future development of cities. This book is based on a special issue of The Information Society: An International Journal.
Argues that a fundamental change in the world's belief structure--the acceptance of consciousness as a causal reality--is changing society
Since the DCMS Creative Industries Mapping Document highlighted the key role played by creative activities in the UK economy and society, the creative industries agenda has expanded across Europe and internationally. They have the support of local authorities, regional development agencies, research councils, arts and cultural agencies and other sector organisations. Within this framework, higher education institutions have also engaged in the creative agenda, but have struggled to define their role in this growing sphere of activities. Higher Education and the Creative Economy critically engages with the complex interconnections between higher education, geography, cultural policy and the creative economy. This book is organised into four sections which articulate the range of dynamics that can emerge between higher education and the creative economy: partnership and collaboration across Higher Education institutions and the creative and cultural industries; the development of creative human capital; connections between arts schools and local art scenes; and links with broader policy directions and work. While it has a strong UK component, it also includes international perspectives, specifically from Australia, Singapore, Europe and the USA. This authoritative collection challenges the boundaries of creative and cultural industry development by bringing together international experts from a range of subject areas, presenting researchers with a unique multidisciplinary approach to the topic. This edited collection will be of interest to researchers and policy makers working in the area of creative and cultural industries development.
Today, telecommunication systems are expanding and evolving at a remarkable rate, with the aid of fiber optics, satellites and comput erized switchboard systems. Airline systems are providing faster and more efficient networks for world-wide human transportation. Com puters are now generally accessible to virtually all industries and many households. But perhaps the most important factor is that education systems are expanding the knowledge base for city populations, thus resulting in increased efficiency in the use of computers, telecommuni cations and rapid transportation systems. The revolutionary age of logistical networks is upon lIS. Logistical networks are those systems which facilitate the movement of knowl edge, commodities, money, and people in association with thE; produc tion or consumption of goods and services. Logistical networks form a set of important infrastructure which serve as hard and soft means to sustain all kinds of movement, transactions and diffusion within and between global networks of cities. Major structural changes in the re gional and urban economy, culture and institutions are triggered by slow but steady changes in global logistical systems.
Increasingly, the Chief Human Resources Officer is being challenged to add value to the organisation’s strategy, to focus more on the transformational as opposed to the transactional, and to provide effective leadership. The Role of the Chief Human Resources Officer provides clear guidelines to HR executives charged with taking the HR function to the next level. The text, which consists of 23 chapters, focuses on the challenges which modern-day CHROs face, regardless of the type of organisation they serve. The content deals with the following areas: What CEOs want and need Leading and aligning the HR function From strategy to execution The changing world of work Leadership challenges in Africa Designing the HR function The role of social capital development Employment realities in emerging markets Talent attraction and retention strategy Reward and recognition Leadership and people development The role of social media Health and wellness in the workplace Amongst the contributing authors are renowned industry leaders and academics such as Theo Veldsman, Shirley Zinn, Steve Bluen, Frank Horwitz, Nolitha Fakude, Penny Abbott, Mark Bussin, Barney Jordaan, Clifford van der Venter, Tjaart Kruger, Linda van der Colff, Johan Ludike, Johann Coetzee, Amanda Glaeser, Dave Duarte, Tony Davidson, Lele Mehlomakulu, Seshni Samuel, Linda Fine, Peter Warrener and Tjaart Minnaar who share their extensive knowledge gained through years of practise in the HR field. While some chapters follow an analytical approach, others are more conversational in nature, yet collectively they offer the reader a wide range of fascinating perspectives and valuable insights. Dave van Eeden is a seasoned HR executive with strong business acumen. He has worked in leading organisations such as UCT, Woolworths, Tiger Brands and Rialto Foods. He holds an MBL from Unisa School of Business Leadership.
Examines trends that can reshape society and offers an understanding of the dynamics to prepare future leaders.
Drawing on an extensive international body of statistical and research evidence, the book analyses the social, economic, and educational trends of the 21st century. It also presents six possible scenarios for school systems over the next 10-20 years.
Asia will redraw the map of economic progress over the next twenty-five years. Growth is necessary to solve economic and social problems, but harder to achieve as the age of plenty gives way to the age of scarcities. The challenge opens the doors for an Asian economic model based on shifting of productivity for the individual to groups, ecological productivity instead of economic productivity, and a reversal to traditional Asian values - less materialistic than Western values. A new paradigm for economic thinking emerges to replace the one launched in the West 200 years ago.
Increasing knowledge of the biological is fundamentally transforming what life itself means and where its boundaries lie. New developments in the biosciences - especially through the molecularisation of life - are (re)shaping healthcare and other aspects of our society. This cutting edge volume studies contemporary bio-objects, or the categories, materialities and processes that are central to the configuring of 'life' today, as they emerge, stabilize and circulate through society. Examining a variety of bio-objects in contexts beyond the laboratory, Bio-Objects: Life in the 21st Century explores new ways of thinking about how novel bio-objects enter contemporary life, analysing the manner in which, among others, the boundaries between human and animal, organic and non-organic, and being 'alive' and the suspension of living, are questioned, destabilised and in some cases re-established. Thematically organised around questions of changing boundaries; the governance and regulation of bio-objects; and changing social, economic and political relations, this book presents rich new case studies from Europe that will be of interest to scholars of science and technology studies, social theory, sociology and law.
This is a theoretical and practical guide on how to undertake and navigate advanced research in the arts, humanities and social sciences.
“A timely and smart discussion of how different cities and regions have made a changing economy work for them – and how policymakers can learn from that to lift the circumstances of working Americans everywhere.”—Barack Obama We’re used to thinking of the United States in opposing terms: red versus blue, haves versus have-nots. But today there are three Americas. At one extreme are the brain hubs—cities like San Francisco, Boston, and Durham—with workers who are among the most productive, creative, and best paid on the planet. At the other extreme are former manufacturing capitals, which are rapidly losing jobs and residents. The rest of America could go either way. For the past thirty years, the three Americas have been growing apart at an accelerating rate. This divergence is one the most important developments in the history of the United States and is reshaping the very fabric of our society, affecting all aspects of our lives, from health and education to family stability and political engagement. But the winners and losers aren’t necessarily who you’d expect. Enrico Moretti’s groundbreaking research shows that you don’t have to be a scientist or an engineer to thrive in one of the brain hubs. Carpenters, taxi-drivers, teachers, nurses, and other local service jobs are created at a ratio of five-to-one in the brain hubs, raising salaries and standard of living for all. Dealing with this split—supporting growth in the hubs while arresting the decline elsewhere—is the challenge of the century, and The New Geography of Jobs lights the way.
Essay from the year 2011 in the subject Art - Overall Considerations, grade: -, San Diego State University, language: English, comment: Art and the Innovation economy, abstract: According to Business Week Magazine: "The game is changing ... it isn't just about math and science anymore (although those are surely important disciplines) it's about creativity, imagination, and, above all, innovation." 1 If creativity and innovation will be the hallmarks of the most successful communities in the 21st century we need to know the answers to the fundamental questions of what makes us creative, innovative, and imaginative. The effort to create a 21st century community is not so much about technology as it is about jobs, dollars and quality of life. It is about organizing one's community to reinvent itself for the new, knowledge economy and society; preparing its citizens to take ownership of their community; and, most importantly, about educating the next generation of leaders and workers to meet the global, social, political and economic challenges we face. This commentary focuses on education and the vital role of the arts in preparing our young people for a new and uncertain future. Although many people still believe that the arts "are nice but not necessary," it is becoming increasingly apparent that the arts are not a frill or an ancillary enrichment activity for elites. Indeed, they may be the most important aspect of a 21st century education. Our schools need the arts and an art-infused curriculum to ensure our children's' and our country's competitiveness in the new global innovation economy.
Prepare your students for the globalized world! To succeed in the global economy, students need to function as entrepreneurs: resourceful, flexible and creative. Researcher and Professor Yong Zhao unlocks the secrets to cultivating independent thinkers who are willing and able to create jobs and contribute positively to the globalized society. This book shows how teachers, administrators and even parents can: Understand the entrepreneurial spirit and harness it Foster student autonomy and leadership Champion inventive learners with necessary resources Develop global partners and resources
In Making is Connecting, David Gauntlett argues that, through making things, people engage with the world and create connections with each other. Both online and offline, we see that people want to make their mark on the world, and to make connections. During the previous century, the production of culture became dominated by professional elite producers. But today, a vast array of people are making and sharing their own ideas, videos and other creative material online, as well as engaging in real-world crafts, art projects and hands-on experiences. Gauntlett argues that we are seeing a shift from a ‘sit-back-and-be-told culture' to a ‘making-and-doing culture'. People are rejecting traditional teaching and television, and making their own learning and entertainment instead. Drawing on evidence from psychology, politics, philosophy and economics, he shows how this shift is necessary and essential for the happiness and survival of modern societies.
"What is everyday creativity? A capacity, a strategy, a process, all of these. It is a capability that is an intimate part of our daily lives and our personalities, yet it remains, for most of us, underdeveloped and, unfortunately, underacknowledged. Editor and leading creativity researcher Ruth Richards writes, "Everyday creativity is...fundamental to our very survival. With our everyday creativity, we adapt flexibly, we improvise, we try different options, whether we are raising a child, counseling a friend, fixing our home, or planning a fundraising event." In this provocative collection, an interdisciplinary group of eminent thinkers offer their thoughts on how embracing creativity--tapping into the "originality of everyday life"--an lead to improved physical and mental health and to new ways of thinking and experiencing the world and ourselves. They show how our creativity can help us live "in the moment," refine our views of human nature at an individual and a societal level, find spiritual meaning, and, ultimately, change our paradigms for survival-and for flourishing-in a world fraught with urgent challenges. Neither a dry treatise nor a manual, this anthology draws upon the latest research in the area to present a lively examination of the phenomenon and process of everyday creativity and its far-reaching ramifications for self, society, politics, human and cultural evolution, and our future"--Jacket. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)
This book is a large-scale study of global creative activism. It explores how activists facilitate the cultivation of societal alternatives. Harrebye shows that social activism has got a creative new edge that is blurring the boundaries between artist and activist, and pop, prank, and protest.
With the publication of The Rise of the Creative Class by Richard Florida in 2002, the 'creative city' became the new hot topic among urban policymakers, planners and economists. Florida has developed one of three path-breaking theories about the relationship between creative individuals and urban environments. The economist Åke E. Andersson and the psychologist Dean Simonton are the other members of this 'creative troika'. In the Handbook of Creative Cities, Florida, Andersson and Simonton appear in the same volume for the first time. The expert contributors in this timely Handbook extend their insights with a varied set of theoretical and empirical tools. The diversity of the contributions reflect the multidisciplinary nature of creative city theorizing, which encompasses urban economics, economic geography, social psychology, urban sociology, and urban planning. The stated policy implications are equally diverse, ranging from libertarian to social democratic visions of our shared creative and urban future. Being truly international in its scope, this major Handbook will be particularly useful for policy makers that are involved in urban development, academics in urban economics, economic geography, urban sociology, social psychology, and urban planning, as well as graduate and advanced undergraduate students across the social sciences and in business.

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