Published to accompany an exhibition on view at the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, Apr. 26-Aug. 7, 2011, and at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Sept. 18-Dec. 10, 2011.
A Great and Monstrous Thing offers a street-level view of eighteenth-century London, a city of grandeur and glitter, squalor and poverty, risen from the ashes of the Great Fire of 1666 that destroyed half its homes and great public buildings. What emerges is a society fractured by geography, politics, religion, history—and especially by class.
This volume includes twelve essays on the history of the book in the long eighteenth century that collectively argue for the importance of integrating literary scholarship and the various practices of book history. Themes include: a rectification of the tendency in literary studies to be blind to the materiality of the book; a focus on the ways that eighteenth-century expectations for books differ from contemporary ideas; the identification of the roles of writers and publishers as reciprocal and competing; the development of modern conventions of the material book; the ways in which the forms of books inform and influence literature and vice versa; the significance of commercial pressures on eighteenth-century book production; the parallels to be drawn between the eighteenth-century expansion of print and our own transformation to digital media. Detailed attention is given to Pope, Manley, Johnson, Richardson, Burney, Curll, and Dodsley among others. The book contains thirty-five illustrations.
"Compositional Theory in the Eighteenth Century" is the most comprehensive account ever given of the theory behind the music of Baroque and Classical composers, from Bach to Beethoven. While giving preeminent theorists their due in this panoramic survey of musical thought, Joel Lester also examines the works of more than one hundred seventeenth- and eighteenth century writers to show how prominent theories were received and applied in actual teaching situations. Beginning with the influence of Zarlino and seventeenth-century theorists, Lester then focuses on central traditions emerging from definitive works in the early eighteenth century. Lester's historic overview is leavened throughout with accounts of individual composers grappling with theoretical issues.
The Oxford History of the British Empire is a major new assessment by leading scholars. Volume II examines the history of British worldwide expansion from the Glorious Revolution of 1689 to the end of the Napoleonic Wars, a crucial phase in the creation of the modern British Empire. This is the age of General Wolfe, Clive of India, and Captain Cook. Although the Empire was ruptured by the American Revolution, it survived and grew into the British Empire that was to dominate the world during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
Examines Shakespeare's influence and popularity in all aspects of eighteenth-century literature, culture and society.
In 1734 the kingdom of Naples became an independent monarchy, but in 1799 a Jacobin revolution transformed it briefly into a republic. In these few but intense decades of independence all the great problems of the age of the Enlightenment became apparent: attacks on feudalism and on the power of the Catholic Church, the struggle for a modern economy, and aspirations to change the administrative machinery and the judicial system. Yet Naples was also the city visited by Winckelmann and Goethe, the city of Sir William Hamilton, of the study of Pompeii and Herculanum, and of the greatest musicians of the age. This collection of essays addresses a range of issues in the city's political and cultural history, and demonstrates the city's importance in shaping the modern, enlightened culture of Europe.
A history of opera in Portugal from the beginning of the eighteenth century to the inauguration of the Teatro de S. Carlos in 1793.
Europe in the Eighteenth Century is a social history of Europe in all its aspects: economic, political, diplomatic military, colonial-expansionist. Crisply and succinctly written, it describes Europe not through a history of individual countries, but in a common context during the three quarters of a century between the death of Louis XIV and the industrial revolution in England and the social and political revolution in France. It presents the development of government, institutions, cities, economies, wars, and the circulation of ideas in terms of social pressures and needs, and stresses growth, interrelationships, and conflict of social classes as agents of historical change, paying particular attention to the role of popular, as well as upper- and middle-class, protest as a factor in that change.
Jonathan Swift lived through a period of turbulence and innovation in the evolution of the book. His publications, perhaps more than those of any other single author, illustrate the range of developments that transformed print culture during the early Enlightenment. Swift was a prolific author and a frequent visitor at the printing house, and he wrote as critic and satirist about the nature of text. The shifting moods of irony, complicity and indignation that characterise his dealings with the book trade add a layer of complexity to the bibliographic record of his published works. The essays collected here offer the first comprehensive, integrated survey of that record. They shed new light on the politics of the eighteenth-century book trade, on Swift's innovations as a maker of books, on the habits and opinions revealed by his commentary on printed texts and on the re-shaping of the Swiftian book after his death.
This fascinating volume brings together Renaissance and eighteenth-century scholars who examine how Shakespeare gradually penetrated, and came to dominate, the culture and intellectual life of people in the English-speaking world. Approaching Shakespeare from a wide range of perspectives, including philosophy, science, textual practice, and theatre studies, the contributors paint a vivid picture of the relationship between eighteenth-century Shakespeare and ideas about shared nationhood, knowledge, morality, history, and the self.
This collection takes a thematic approach to eighteenth-century history, covering such topics as domestic politics (including popular political culture), religious developments and changes, social and demographic structure and growth, and culture. It presents a lively picture of an era of intense change and growth.
French architecture of the 18th century - which exhibited great technical ability and refined taste - influenced architectural style throughout Europe. This book is a survey of the French architecture of the period. It begins with the origins of the style moderne under the last years of Louis XIV, discusses the end of Rococo and the return to antiquity, and concludes with the Revolutionary architecture and the house of Madame Recamier.
"The Art Through the Century series introduces readers to important visual vocabulary of Western art."--Back cover.
A collection of articles concentrated on the Enlightenment in France argues for a scaled-down interpretation of the significance of the movement.
Twelve scholars from the fields of English, French, and German literature here examine the complex ways in which the human body becomes the privileged semiotic model through which eighteenth-century culture defines its political and conceptual centers. In making clear that the deployment of the body varies tremendously depending on what is meant by the 'human body', the essays draw on popular literature, poetics and aesthetics, garden architecture, physiognomy, beauty manuals, pornography and philosophy, as well as on canonical works in the genres of the novel and the drama.
By identifying a pervasive cultivation of attention as a perceptual and cognitive state in eighteenth-century poetry, this book explores overt themes of attention and demonstrate techniques of readerly attention.
This classic volume, first published in 1928, is a comprehensive introduction to all aspects of the Industrial Revolution. Arranged in three distinct parts, it covers: * Preparatory Changes * Inventions and Factories * The Immediate Consequences. A valuable reference, it is, as Professor T. S. Ashton says in his preface to this work, 'in both its architecture and detail this volume is by far the best introduction to the subject in any language... one of a few works on economic history that can justly be spoken of as classics'.

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