Published to accompany an exhibition on view at the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, Apr. 26-Aug. 7, 2011, and at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Sept. 18-Dec. 10, 2011.
"Compositional Theory in the Eighteenth Century" is the most comprehensive account ever given of the theory behind the music of Baroque and Classical composers, from Bach to Beethoven. While giving preeminent theorists their due in this panoramic survey of musical thought, Joel Lester also examines the works of more than one hundred seventeenth- and eighteenth century writers to show how prominent theories were received and applied in actual teaching situations. Beginning with the influence of Zarlino and seventeenth-century theorists, Lester then focuses on central traditions emerging from definitive works in the early eighteenth century. Lester's historic overview is leavened throughout with accounts of individual composers grappling with theoretical issues.
Examines Shakespeare's influence and popularity in all aspects of eighteenth-century literature, culture and society.
This work explores the British country house between 1700-1830 and looks at the lives of the noblemen and the servants who inhabited them. Reference is made to the whole of the British Isles and there is a discussion of their political significance.
In 1734 the kingdom of Naples became an independent monarchy, but in 1799 a Jacobin revolution transformed it briefly into a republic. In these few but intense decades of independence all the great problems of the age of the Enlightenment became apparent: attacks on feudalism and on the power of the Catholic Church, the struggle for a modern economy, and aspirations to change the administrative machinery and the judicial system. Yet Naples was also the city visited by Winckelmann and Goethe, the city of Sir William Hamilton, of the study of Pompeii and Herculanum, and of the greatest musicians of the age. This collection of essays addresses a range of issues in the city's political and cultural history, and demonstrates the city's importance in shaping the modern, enlightened culture of Europe.
Traditional musicology has tended to see the Spanish eighteenth century as a period of decline, but this 1998 volume shows it to be rich in interest and achievement. Covering stage genres, orchestral and instrumental music and vocal music (both sacred and secular), it brings together the results of research on such topics as opera, musical instruments, the secular cantata and the villancico and challenges received ideas about how Italian and Austrian music of the period influenced (or was opposed by) Spanish composers and theorists. Two final chapters outline the presence of Spanish musical sources in the New World.
Twelve scholars from the fields of English, French, and German literature here examine the complex ways in which the human body becomes the privileged semiotic model through which eighteenth-century culture defines its political and conceptual centers. In making clear that the deployment of the body varies tremendously depending on what is meant by the 'human body', the essays draw on popular literature, poetics and aesthetics, garden architecture, physiognomy, beauty manuals, pornography and philosophy, as well as on canonical works in the genres of the novel and the drama.
This is the abridged version of the 1992 cloth edition, volume 5 in the eight-volume history of Africa. Volume 5 covers the continuing internal evolution of the states and cultures of Africca, and the increasing involvement of African states in external trade.
"This volume seeks to delineate the history of the production, dissemination, and reception of texts from the earliest pictograms of the mid-4th millennium to recent developments in electronic books."--P. xi.
The uniformity of graphic design in contemporary paperback and critical editions of the eighteenth-century novel no longer conveys the visual appeal of early editions. Janine Barchas explains how the novel's material embodiment as printed book rivalled its narrative content in diversity and creativity in the first half of the eighteenth century. Prose writers such as Daniel Defoe, Jonathan Swift, and Henry and Sarah Fielding experimented with the novel's physical appearance from the beginning of its emergence in Britain.
This fascinating volume brings together Renaissance and eighteenth-century scholars who examine how Shakespeare gradually penetrated, and came to dominate, the culture and intellectual life of people in the English-speaking world. Approaching Shakespeare from a wide range of perspectives, including philosophy, science, textual practice, and theatre studies, the contributors paint a vivid picture of the relationship between eighteenth-century Shakespeare and ideas about shared nationhood, knowledge, morality, history, and the self.
This collection takes a thematic approach to eighteenth-century history, covering such topics as domestic politics (including popular political culture), religious developments and changes, social and demographic structure and growth, and culture. It presents a lively picture of an era of intense change and growth.
Covers such events as the Great Awakening, the Stamp Act, and the French Indian War
A manual dedicated to recreating the brewed beverages that existed in the American Colonies. All of the historic recipes were documented as dating from 1800 or earlier, and all were taste-tested. The book consists of more than fifty recipes for ale, beer, mead, hard cider, and mixed drinks, including an award winning recipe for porter. Along with the recipes is a how-to chapter on brewing. There is an additional chapter on non-alcoholic brews, such as tea and coffee, and herbalsubstitutes for both. Plus, a section on making non-alcoholic beer, and carbonated soft drinks.
This classic volume, first published in 1928, is a comprehensive introduction to all aspects of the Industrial Revolution. Arranged in three distinct parts, it covers: * Preparatory Changes * Inventions and Factories * The Immediate Consequences. A valuable reference, it is, as Professor T. S. Ashton says in his preface to this work, 'in both its architecture and detail this volume is by far the best introduction to the subject in any language... one of a few works on economic history that can justly be spoken of as classics'.
This is the first book to provide comprehensive coverage of the full range of philosophical writing in Britain in the eighteenth century. A team of experts provides new accounts of both major and lesser-known thinkers, and explores the diverse approaches in the period to logic and metaphysics, the passions, morality, criticism, and politics.

Best Books