"A clear and vivid exposition of the essential ideas and methods of the theory of relativity...can be warmly recommended especially to those who cannot spend too much time on the subject." -- Albert Einstein. Using "just enough mathematics to help and not to hinder the lay reader", Lillian Lieber provides a thorough explanation of Einstein's theory of relativity. Her delightful style, in combination with her husband's charming illustrations, makes for an interesting and accessible read about one of the greatest ideas of all times.
Exposition of fourth dimension, concepts of relativity as Flatland characters continue adventures. Topics include curved space time as a higher dimension, special relativity, and shape of space-time. Includes 141 illustrations.
A Companion to the Philosophy of Time presents the broadest treatment of this subject yet; 32 specially commissioned articles - written by an international line-up of experts – provide an unparalleled reference work for students and specialists alike in this exciting field. The most comprehensive reference work on the philosophy of time currently available The first collection to tackle the historical development of the philosophy of time in addition to covering contemporary work Provides a tripartite approach in its organization, covering history of the philosophy of time, time as a feature of the physical world, and time as a feature of experience Includes contributions from both distinguished, well-established scholars and rising stars in the field
These brand-new readers are designed to extend and deepen students' level of scientific knowledge and understanding. Topics are presented in various forms - stories, case studies, articles and discussion pieces - to stimulate and gain students' interest. Questions increase in difficulty in order to show students' progression, and help consolidate learning.
Physics of the Impossible takes us on a journey to the frontiers of science and beyond, giving us an exhilarating insight into what we can really hope to achieve in the future. Everyday we see that what was once declared 'impossible' by scientists has become part of our everyday lives: fax machines, glass sky-scrapers, gas-powered automobiles and a worldwide communications network. Here internationally bestselling author Micho Kaku confidently hurdles today's frontier of science, revealing the actual possibilities of perpetual motion, force fields, invisibility, ray guns, anti-gravity and anti-matter, teleportation, telepathy, psychokinesis, robots and cyborgs, time travel, zero-point energy, even extraterrestrial life. And he shows how few of these ideas actually violate the laws of physics. Where does the realm of science fiction end? What can we really hope to achieve? 'Anything that is not impossible, is mandatory!' declares Kaku in this lucid, entertaining and enlightening read.
Everything is connected... We''re living in the midst of a scientific revolution that''s captured the general public''s attention and imagination. The aim of this new revolution is to develop a "theory of everything"- -- a set of laws of physics that will explain all that can be explained, ranging from the tiniest subatomic particle to the universe as a whole. Here, readers will learn the ideas behind the theories, and their effects upon our world, our civilization, and ourselves.
In November 1919, newspapers around the world alerted readers to a sensational new theory of the universe: Albert Einstein’s theory of relativity. Coming at a time of social, political, and economic upheaval, Einstein’s theory quickly became a rich cultural resource with many uses beyond physical theory. Media coverage of relativity in Britain took on qualities of pastiche and parody, as serious attempts to evaluate Einstein’s theory jostled with jokes and satires linking relativity to everything from railway budgets to religion. The image of a befuddled newspaper reader attempting to explain Einstein’s theory to his companions became a set piece in the popular press. Loving Faster than Light focuses on the popular reception of relativity in Britain, demonstrating how abstract science came to be entangled with class politics, new media technology, changing sex relations, crime, cricket, and cinematography in the British imagination during the 1920s. Blending literary analysis with insights from the history of science, Katy Price reveals how cultural meanings for Einstein’s relativity were negotiated in newspapers with differing political agendas, popular science magazines, pulp fiction adventure and romance stories, detective plots, and esoteric love poetry. Loving Faster than Light is an essential read for anyone interested in popular science, the intersection of science and literature, and the social and cultural history of physics.
Science news is met by the public with a mixture of fascination and disengagement. On the one hand, Americans are inflamed by topics ranging from the question of whether or not Pluto is a planet to the ethics of stem-cell research. But the complexity of scientific research can also be confusing and overwhelming, causing many to divert their attentions elsewhere and leave science to the “experts.” Whether they follow science news closely or not, Americans take for granted that discoveries in the sciences are occurring constantly. Few, however, stop to consider how these advances—and the debates they sometimes lead to—contribute to the changing definition of the term “science” itself. Going beyond the issue-centered debates, Daniel Patrick Thurs examines what these controversies say about how we understand science now and in the future. Drawing on his analysis of magazines, newspapers, journals and other forms of public discourse, Thurs describes how science—originally used as a synonym for general knowledge—became a term to distinguish particular subjects as elite forms of study accessible only to the highly educated.
Acclaimed by Einstein himself, this is among the clearest, most readable expositions of relativity theory. It explains the problems Einstein faced, the experiments that led to his theories, and what his findings reveal about the forces that govern the universe. 1957 edition.
Leben wir in der Zeit oder lebt die Zeit vielleicht nur in uns? Alle theoretischen Physiker von Weltrang, die den großen und kleinen Kräften des Universums nachspüren, beschäftigen sich immer wieder mit der entscheidenden Frage, was Zeit ist. Wenn ihre großen Modelle die Zeit zur Erklärung des Elementaren nicht mehr brauchen, wie kommt es dann, dass sie für unser Leben so wichtig ist? Geht es wirklich ohne sie? Carlo Rovelli gibt in diesem Buch überraschende Antworten. Er nimmt uns mit auf eine Reise durch unsere Vorstellungen der von der Zeit und spürt ihren Regeln und Rätseln nach. Ein großes, packend geschriebenes Lese-Abenteuer, ein würdiger Nachfolger des Welt-Bestsellers "Sieben kurze Lektionen über Physik".
In this simple and lively book, Samael Aun Weor describes his experiences of a wide variety of metaphysical and paranormal phenomena. Going beyond the usual pseudo-spiritual approach, this book introduces the reader to Gnosis: the practical science of awakening the Consciousness, by means of which any person can experience the realities that exist beyond the physical senses. This is an excellent book for young people and for those who are first being introduced to Gnosis. "Do you want to know something from the beyond? Do you want to chat with divine beings face to face? "It is indispensable to enter into the region of the dead at will, to visit the celestial regions, to know other worlds of the infinite space. "Outside of the physical body, one can give to himself the luxury of invoking beloved relatives who already passed through the doors of death. They will concur to our call, then we can personally chat with them... "When out of the physical body, we can acquire complete knowledge about the mysteries of death and life. Out of the physical body, we can invoke the angels in order to talk personally with them face to face."
Time Machines takes you on an exhilarating journey through the intriguing theories of scientists and the far-flung imaginations of writers. It explores the ideas of time travel from the first account in English literature to the latest theories of physicists such as Kip Thorne and Igor Novikov. This very readable work covers a variety of topics including the history of time travel in fiction; the fundamental scientific concepts of time, spacetime, and the fourth dimension; the speculations of Einstein, Richard Feynman, Kurt Gödel, and others; time travel paradoxes, and much more. For anyone who shares a fascination with time travel, Time Machines is an engrossing study of what writers have imagined and what scientists may some day make possible. "Here's a gem of a book...all peppered with delightful notes...I can't turn a page without finding a jewel."Clifford Stoll, University of California, Berkeley, author of "The Cuckoo's Egg""...I have been struck by the richness and complexity of the tapestry of ideas that Nahin presents...may well remain the most readable and complete treatise on time travel in science and science fiction." Kip S. Thorne, The Feynman Professor of Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology"if, like me, you are a child at heart, the real fun lies in the zany stories and wild speculations" Physics World
One of the most talented contemporary authors of cutting-edge math and science books conducts a fascinating tour of a higher reality, the Fourth Dimension. Includes problems, puzzles, and 200 drawings. "Informative and mind-dazzling." — Martin Gardner.
The Book of Revelation's legacy of visual imagery is evaluated here, from the 11th century to the end of World War 2 illuminated manuscripts, books, prints and drawings of apocalyptic phases are examined.
With the aid of diagrams, a science-fiction tale, and examples from philosophy, music, and modern physics, a writer for Discover magazine invites readers to the forefront of science to explore the mysterious nature of time. UP.
Explains how these mountain ranges were formed and describes the expeditions through which the author, a geologist and mountaineer, gained the evidence he needed to support his theories about the process of their formation.
The main substance of the book begins with a background review of Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity as it pertains to relativistic flight mechanics and space travel. Next, the book moves into relativistic rocket mechanics and related subject matter. Finally, the primary subjects regarding space travel are covered in some depth-a crescendo for the book. This is followed by a geometric treatment of relativistic effects by using Minkowski diagrams and K-calculus. The book concludes with brief discussions of other prospective, even exotic, transport systems for relativistic space travel.An appendix is provided to cover tables of useful data and unit conversions together with mathematical identities and other information used in this book. Annotated references are provided for further reading. A detailed glossary and index are given at the beginning and end of the book, respectively. To provide a better understanding of the subject matter presented in the book, simple problems with answers are provided at the end of each of the four substantive chapters.
One of the world's most outstanding astrophysicists provides a state-of-the-art investigation into the possibility of time travel. Human beings have a strong desire to travel through time. Although scientists are not yet taking out patents on a time machine, they are investigating whether it is possible under the laws of physics. In Newton's three-dimensional world this would have been inconceivable. But with Einstein's theory of relativity a fourth dimension time enters the frame. Is it really inconceivable that we can travel along the timeline? In this book Richard Gott offers an intellectually expansive, witty and engaging study of the viability of time travel, which takes us from the dream of time travel itself in H. G. Wells's path-breaking novel THE TIME MACHINE to cutting-edge research into astrophysics and quantum teleportation. He explores the scientific, social and moral implications of time travel, and looks at recent remarkable experiments in which fundamental particles were actually sent into the future.

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