"A clear and vivid exposition of the essential ideas and methods of the theory of relativity...can be warmly recommended especially to those who cannot spend too much time on the subject." -- Albert Einstein. Using "just enough mathematics to help and not to hinder the lay reader", Lillian Lieber provides a thorough explanation of Einstein's theory of relativity. Her delightful style, in combination with her husband's charming illustrations, makes for an interesting and accessible read about one of the greatest ideas of all times.
Semi-technical account includes a review of classical physics (origin of space and time measurements, Ptolemaic and Copernican astronomy, laws of motion, inertia, more) and of Einstein's theories of relativity.
Exposition of fourth dimension, concepts of relativity as Flatland characters continue adventures. Topics include curved space time as a higher dimension, special relativity, and shape of space-time. Includes 141 illustrations.
A Princeton astrophysicist explores whether journeying to the past or future is scientifically possible in this “intriguing” volume (Neil deGrasse Tyson). It was H. G. Wells who coined the term “time machine”—but the concept of time travel, both forward and backward, has always provoked fascination and yearning. It has mostly been dismissed as an impossibility in the world of physics; yet theories posited by Einstein, and advanced by scientists including Stephen Hawking and Kip Thorne, suggest that the phenomenon could actually occur. Building on these ideas, J. Richard Gott, a professor who has written on the subject for Scientific American, Time, and other publications, describes how travel to the future is not only possible but has already happened—and contemplates whether travel to the past is also conceivable. This look at the surprising facts behind the science fiction of time travel “deserves the attention of anyone wanting wider intellectual horizons” (Booklist). “Impressively clear language. Practical tips for chrononauts on their options for travel and the contingencies to prepare for make everything sound bizarrely plausible. Gott clearly enjoys his subject and his excitement and humor are contagious; this book is a delight to read.” —Publishers Weekly
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Reissued in new covers, this is the run-away bestseller from one of the world's leading theoretical physicists. Are there other dimensions beyond our own? Is time travel possible? Michio Kaku takes us on a tour of the most exciting work in modern physics, including research into the 10th dimension, time warps, and multiple universes, to outline what may be the leading candidate for the Theory of Everything.
The most important scientist of the twentieth century and the most important artist had their periods of greatest creativity almost simultaneously and in remarkably similar circumstances. This fascinating parallel biography of Albert Einstein and Pablo Picasso as young men examines their greatest creations-Picasso's Les Demoiselles d'Avignon and Einstein's special theory of relativity. Miller shows how these breakthroughs arose not only from within their respective fields but from larger currents in the intellectual culture of the times. Ultimately, Miller shows how Einstein and Picasso, in a deep and important sense, were both working on the same problem.
A Companion to the Philosophy of Time presents the broadest treatment of this subject yet; 32 specially commissioned articles - written by an international line-up of experts – provide an unparalleled reference work for students and specialists alike in this exciting field. The most comprehensive reference work on the philosophy of time currently available The first collection to tackle the historical development of the philosophy of time in addition to covering contemporary work Provides a tripartite approach in its organization, covering history of the philosophy of time, time as a feature of the physical world, and time as a feature of experience Includes contributions from both distinguished, well-established scholars and rising stars in the field
Whether you are stumped by the "commutative law" in algebra or a whiz at multiplying three-digit numbers in your head, this book opens the door to the wonders of mathematical imagining. By using simple language and intriguing illustrations drawn by her husband, Hugh, Lillian Lieber presents subtle mathematical concepts in an easy-to-understand way. Over sixty years after its release, this whimsical exploration of how to think in a mathematical mood will continue to delight math-lovers of all ages. Barry Mazur's new introduction is a tribute to the Liebers' influence on generations of mathematicians.
This book offers an entertaining, yet thorough, explanation of the concept of, yes, infinity. Accessible to non-mathematicians, this book also cleverly connects mathematical reasoning to larger issues in society.
In this insightful book, which is a revisionist math history as well as a revisionist art history, Tony Robbin, well known for his innovative computer visualizations of hyperspace, investigates different models of the fourth dimension and how these are applied in art and physics. Robbin explores the distinction between the slicing, or Flatland, model and the projection, or shadow, model. He compares the history of these two models and their uses and misuses in popular discussions. Robbin breaks new ground with his original argument that Picasso used the projection model to invent cubism, and that Minkowski had four-dimensional projective geometry in mind when he structured special relativity. The discussion is brought to the present with an exposition of the projection model in the most creative ideas about space in contemporary mathematics such as twisters, quasicrystals, and quantum topology. Robbin clarifies these esoteric concepts with understandable drawings and diagrams. Robbin proposes that the powerful role of projective geometry in the development of current mathematical ideas has been long overlooked and that our attachment to the slicing model is essentially a conceptual block that hinders progress in understanding contemporary models of spacetime. He offers a fascinating review of how projective ideas are the source of some of today’s most exciting developments in art, math, physics, and computer visualization.
Scientific experts explore the ideas behind the hit TV show. Fringe Science delves into the science, science fiction, and pseudoscience of Fringe with a collection of essays on everything from alternate universes to time travel to genetically targeted toxins, as well as discussions on the show’s moral philosophy and the consequences of playing God. MIT physics professor Max Tegmark illuminates the real-life possibilities of parallel universes Stephen Cass, founding editor of Discover’s Science Not Fiction blog and a senior editor with Technology Review, unravels Fringe’s use of time travel Award-winning science fiction historian Amy H. Sturgis walks us through the show’s literary and television ancestors, from the 1800s on Television Without Pity staff writer Jacob Clifton looks at the role of the scientist, and scientific redemption, through the ever-shifting role of Massive Dynamic Garth Sundem, bestselling author of Brain Candy, explores the mysterious way that memory works, from why Walter forgets to how Olivia remembers Paul Levinson, award-winning author of The Silk Code, shows how Fringe re-invents themes from golden-age 1950s science fiction And more, from lab cow Gene’s scientific résumé to why the Observers should be wearing white lab coats.
This book examines the science fiction stories that explain the technology and effects of time travel.
From the celebrated author of the best-selling Physics for Future Presidents comes “a provocative, strongly argued book on the fundamental nature of time” (Lee Smolin). You are reading the word “now” right now. But what does that mean? What makes the ephemeral moment “now” so special? Its enigmatic character has bedeviled philosophers, priests, and modern-day physicists from Augustine to Einstein and beyond. Einstein showed that the flow of time is affected by both velocity and gravity, yet he despaired at his failure to explain the meaning of “now.” Equally puzzling: why does time flow? Some physicists have given up trying to understand, and call the flow of time an illusion, but the eminent experimentalist physicist Richard A. Muller protests. He says physics should explain reality, not deny it. In Now, Muller does more than poke holes in past ideas; he crafts his own revolutionary theory, one that makes testable predictions. He begins by laying out—with the refreshing clarity that made Physics for Future Presidents so successful—a firm and remarkably clear explanation of the physics building blocks of his theory: relativity, entropy, entanglement, antimatter, and the Big Bang. With the stage then set, he reveals a startling way forward. Muller’s monumental work will spark major debate about the most fundamental assumptions of our universe, and may crack one of physics’s longest-standing enigmas.
Presents essays that explore the deepest mysteries of the universe, including black holes, gravity holes, and time travel, by physicists Stephen Hawking, Kip S. Thorne, Igor Novikov, Timothy Ferris, and Alan Lightman.
A detailed description of what the fourth dimension would be like.
Everything is connected... We''re living in the midst of a scientific revolution that''s captured the general public''s attention and imagination. The aim of this new revolution is to develop a "theory of everything"- -- a set of laws of physics that will explain all that can be explained, ranging from the tiniest subatomic particle to the universe as a whole. Here, readers will learn the ideas behind the theories, and their effects upon our world, our civilization, and ourselves.

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