#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER & NOW A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE Shocked by the teenage violence she witnessed during the Rodney King riots in Los Angeles, Erin Gruwell became a teacher at a high school rampant with hostility and racial intolerance. For many of these students–whose ranks included substance abusers, gang members, the homeless, and victims of abuse–Gruwell was the first person to treat them with dignity, to believe in their potential and help them see it themselves. Soon, their loyalty towards their teacher and burning enthusiasm to help end violence and intolerance became a force of its own. Inspired by reading The Diary of Anne Frank and meeting Zlata Filipovic (the eleven-year old girl who wrote of her life in Sarajevo during the civil war), the students began a joint diary of their inner-city upbringings. Told through anonymous entries to protect their identities and allow for complete candor, The Freedom Writers Diary is filled with astounding vignettes from 150 students who, like civil rights activist Rosa Parks and the Freedom Riders, heard society tell them where to go–and refused to listen. Proceeds from this book benefit the Freedom Writers Foundation, an organization set up to provide scholarships for underprivieged youth and to train teachers
A true account of a teacher who confronted a room of "at-risk" students details their life-changing journey and includes diary excerpts
A true account of a teacher who confronted a room of "at-risk" students details their life-changing journey and includes diary excerpts
“There are lives lost in this book, and there are lives saved, too, if salvation means a young man or woman begins to feel deserving of a place on the planet. . . . What could be more soul-satisfying? These are the most influential professionals most of us will ever meet. The effects of their work will last forever.” –from the foreword by Anna Quindlen Now depicted in a bestselling book and a feature film, the Freedom Writers phenomenon came about in 1994 when Erin Gruwell stepped into Room 203 and began her first teaching job out of college. Long Beach, California, was still reeling from the deadly violence that erupted during the Rodney King riots, and the kids in Erin’s classroom reflected the anger, resentment, and hopelessness of their community. Undaunted, Erin fostered an educational philosophy that valued and promoted diversity, tolerance, and communication, and in the process, she transformed her students’ lives, as well as her own. Erin Gruwell and the Freedom Writers went on to establish the Freedom Writers Foundation to replicate the success of Room 203 and provide all students with hope and opportunities to realize their academic potential. Since then, the foundation has trained more than 150 teachers in the United States and Canada. Teaching Hope unites the voices of these Freedom Writer teachers, who share uplifting, devastating, and poignant stories from their classrooms, stories that provide insight into the struggles and triumphs of education in all of its forms. Mirroring an academic year, these dispatches from the front lines of education take us from the anticipation of the first day to the disillusionment, challenges, and triumphs of the school year. These are the voices of teachers who persevere in the face of intolerance, rigid administration, and countless other challenges, and continue to reach out and teach those who are deemed unteachable. Their stories inspire everyone to make a difference in the world around them. From the Trade Paperback edition.
The author describes her life and work as a teacher and advocate for at-risk youngsters, introducing the principles and practices of her innovative educational program designed to teach tolerance through literature and writing.
Published to coincide with the 100th anniversary of Durr's birth--A unique civil rights diary that captures the daily struggles of the movement in the 1960s.
An inspiring guide to transforming education for children describes the methods through which the author exposes first-generation immigrant students to classic culture and enables them to score in the top one percent on standardized tests.
A chronicle of the war in Sarajevo from a child's perspective details the author's struggle for survival and a normal life in a chaotic nation from 1991 through 1993, revealing how an innocent life of piano lessons and birthday parties was transformed into horrifying days of food shortages, friends dying, and hiding out in a neighbor's cellar during bombings. Reissue.
Since the mid 1980s academic libraries have established minority residency programs in an effort to increase the representation of librarians of color in their institutions. Now more than a decade later, these programs continue to be developed. This collection provides essays by librarians of color who participated in residency programs, as well as some of the library administrators whose institutions made these programs possible.
In this provocative book, authors Washor and Mojkowski observe that beneath the worrisome levels of dropouts from our nation’s high school lurks a more insidious problem: student disengagement from school and from deep and productive learning. To keep students in school and engaged as productive learners through to graduation, schools must provide experiences in which all students do some of their learning outside school as a formal part of their programs of study. All students need to leave school—frequently, regularly, and, of course, temporarily—to stay in school and persist in their learning. To accomplish this, schools must combine academic learning with experiential learning, allowing students to bring real-world learning back into the school, where it should be recognized, assessed, and awarded academic credit. Learning outside of school, as a complement to in-school learning, provides opportunities for deep engagement in rigorous learning.
Enter the realm of fallen angels and rising passions with this boxed set that includes Hush, Hush, Crescendo, Silence, and Finale. A gripping saga that chronicles the destiny of Nora and Patch from the beginning of their relationship to the dire events ~ and forces ~ that threaten to tear them apart, this collection of all four Hush, Hush books is the perfect present for loyal fans and series newcomers. Praise for Hush, Hush: 'A rollercoaster of twists and turns...a great, new and different novel' Sunday Express 'A fast-paced, exhilarating read...fans of paranormal romance should be rapt' Publishers Weekly 'Absolutely brilliant!' BellaAndEdward.com Praise for Crescendo: 'Dark, sexy and compelling' The Bookseller 'Great sexual tension… hot, tense and moreish' The Bookbag Praise for Silence: 'An action packed suspenseful story that had my eyes glued to the page and tears falling…Silence is another fascinating, memorable, heart-breaking, story.' Dark Readers 'The perfect escape into fantasy and a love that can break all boundaries.' Sugarscape Praise for Finale: 'Finale was everything I hoped it would be and more. I have been a fan of the Hush, Hush series since the beginning and Finale was the perfect, well, finale.' Bookbabblers 'By far my favorite book in the entire series, it brings all of the elements of the story to a fantastic conclusion.' Book Angel Booktopia 'Fitzpatrick is an awesome author, and her writing constantly kept me turning the pages addictively.' Once Upon a Bookcase
A young girl's journal records her family's struggles during two years of hiding from the Nazis in war-torn Holland.
A practical handbook for educators by the creator of The Freedom Writers Foundation introduces the innovative teaching techniques and unconventional strategies used successfully in her own classroom to inspire, encourage, and nurture even those students deemed "un-teachable." Original. 15,000 first printing.
An inner-city teacher at Parkmont High School, and former Marine, shares anecdotes about the various creative devices she used to get her students to learn
For use in schools and libraries only. Rufus Henry, a young parolee, jeopardizes his life when he refuses to cooperate with the neighborhood street gang.
The number and intensity of childhood stresses have dramatically increased in the past decade, forcing children to grow up faster. This book reasserts the value of childhood, and provides the information needed to help children deal with life's problems.
Why cant U teach me 2 read? is a vivid, stirring, passionately told story of three students who fought for the right to learn to read, and won—only to discover that their efforts to learn to read had hardly begun. A person who cannot read cannot confidently ride a city bus, shop, take medicine, or hold a job—much less receive e-mail, follow headlines, send text messages, or write a letter to a relative. And yet the best minds of American education cannot agree on the right way for reading to be taught. In fact, they can hardly settle on a common vocabulary to use in talking about reading. As a result, for a quarter of a century American schools have been riven by what educators call the reading wars, and our young people have been caught in the crossfire. Why cant U teach me 2 read? focuses on three such students. Yamilka, Alejandro, and Antonio all have learning disabilities and all legally challenged the New York City schools for failing to teach them to read by the time they got to high school. When the school system's own hearing officers ruled in the students' favor, the city was compelled to pay for the three students, now young adults, to receive intensive private tutoring. Fertig tells the inspiring, heartbreaking stories of these three young people as they struggle to learn to read before it is too late. At the same time, she tells a story of great change in schools nationwide—where the crush of standardized tests and the presence of technocrats like New York's mayor, Michael Bloomberg, and his schools chancellor, Joel Klein, have energized teachers and parents to question the meaning of education as never before. And she dramatizes the process of learning to read, showing how the act of reading is nothing short of miraculous. Along the way, Fertig makes clear that the simple question facing students and teachers alike—How should young people learn to read?—opens onto the broader questions of what schools are really for and why so many of America's schools are faltering. Why cant U teach me 2 read? is a poignant, vital book for the reader in all of us.
THOSE WHO CAN, TEACH, 14th Edition, offers a state-of-the-art, dynamic, and reader-friendly approach to help students make informed decisions about entering the teaching profession. Using multiple sources, including biographies, narratives, profiles, and interviews with top educators and scholars, the text exposes students to the realities of teaching while inspiring and welcoming them to a rewarding, high-impact career. The acclaimed author team's direct, conversational tone invites readers to reflect on the satisfactions and problems of teaching in the United States, and casts a teaching career as a positive challenge. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.
A must-read for parents, new teachers, and classroom veterans, Educating Esmé is the exuberant diary of Esmé Raji Codell’s first year teaching in a Chicago public school. Fresh-mouthed and free-spirited, the irrepressible Madame Esmé—as she prefers to be called—does the cha-cha during multiplication tables, roller-skates down the hallways, and puts on rousing performances with at-risk students in the library. Her diary opens a window into a real-life classroom from a teacher’s perspective. While battling bureaucrats, gang members, abusive parents, and her own insecurities, this gifted young woman reveals what it takes to be an exceptional teacher. Heroine to thousands of parents and educators, Esmé now shares more of her ingenious and yet down-to-earth approaches to the classroom in a supplementary guide to help new teachers hit the ground running. As relevant and iconoclastic as when it was first published, Educating Esmé is a classic, as is Madame Esmé herself.

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