This book offers a presentation of the special theory of relativity that is mathematically rigorous and yet spells out in considerable detail the physical significance of the mathematics. It treats, in addition to the usual menu of topics one is accustomed to finding in introductions to special relativity, a wide variety of results of more contemporary origin. These include Zeeman’s characterization of the causal automorphisms of Minkowski spacetime, the Penrose theorem on the apparent shape of a relativistically moving sphere, a detailed introduction to the theory of spinors, a Petrov-type classification of electromagnetic fields in both tensor and spinor form, a topology for Minkowski spacetime whose homeomorphism group is essentially the Lorentz group, and a careful discussion of Dirac’s famous Scissors Problem and its relation to the notion of a two-valued representation of the Lorentz group. This second edition includes a new chapter on the de Sitter universe which is intended to serve two purposes. The first is to provide a gentle prologue to the steps one must take to move beyond special relativity and adapt to the presence of gravitational fields that cannot be considered negligible. The second is to understand some of the basic features of a model of the empty universe that differs markedly from Minkowski spacetime, but may be recommended by recent astronomical observations suggesting that the expansion of our own universe is accelerating rather than slowing down. The treatment presumes only a knowledge of linear algebra in the first three chapters, a bit of real analysis in the fourth and, in two appendices, some elementary point-set topology. The first edition of the book received the 1993 CHOICE award for Outstanding Academic Title. Reviews of first edition: “... a valuable contribution to the pedagogical literature which will be enjoyed by all who delight in precise mathematics and physics.” (American Mathematical Society, 1993) “Where many physics texts explain physical phenomena by means of mathematical models, here a rigorous and detailed mathematical development is accompanied by precise physical interpretations.” (CHOICE, 1993) “... his talent in choosing the most significant results and ordering them within the book can’t be denied. The reading of the book is, really, a pleasure.” (Dutch Mathematical Society, 1993)
Publisher description: This book is a reference for librarians, mathematicians, and statisticians involved in college and research level mathematics and statistics in the 21st century. Part I is a historical survey of the past 15 years tracking this huge transition in scholarly communications in mathematics. Part II of the book is the bibliography of resources recommended to support the disciplines of mathematics and statistics. These resources are grouped by material type. Publication dates range from the 1800's onwards. Hundreds of electronic resources-some online, both dynamic and static, some in fixed media, are listed among the paper resources. A majority of listed electronic resources are free.
This book arose out of original research on the extension of well-established applications of complex numbers related to Euclidean geometry and to the space-time symmetry of two-dimensional Special Relativity. The system of hyperbolic numbers is extensively studied, and a plain exposition of space-time geometry and trigonometry is given. Commutative hypercomplex systems with four unities are studied and attention is drawn to their interesting properties.
While applications rapidly change one to the next in our commercialized world, fundamental principles behind those applications remain constant. So if one understands those principles well enough and has ample experience in applying them, he or she will be able to develop a capacity for reaching results via conceptual thinking rather than having to always rely on models to test various conditions. In Solid State and Quantum Theory for Optoelectronics, Michael Parker provides a general conceptual framework for matter that leads to the matter-light interaction explored in the author’s Physics of Optoelectronics (CRC Press). Instead of overburdening readers with the definition–theorem– proof format often expected in mathematics texts, this book instructs readers through the development of conceptual pictures. Employing a proven pedagogic approach, as rigorous as it is intuitive, Professor Parker – Provides several lead-ins to the quantum theory including a brief review of Lagrange and Hamilton’s approach to classical mechanics and the fundamental quantum link with Hilbert space Demonstrates the Schrödinger wave equation from the Feynman path integral Discusses standard topics such as the quantum well, harmonic oscillator, representations, perturbation theory, and spin Expands discussion from the density operator and its applications to quantum computing and teleportation Provides the concepts for ensembles and microstates in detail with emphasis on the derivation of particle population distributions across energy levels Professors Parker includes problems to help readers understand and internalize the material. But just as important, the working-through of these problems will help readers develop the sort of approach that, instead of wholly relying on models, enables them to extrapolate solutions guided by informed intuition developed over the course of formal study and laboratory experiment. It is the kind of conceptual thinking that will allow readers to move with deeper understanding from optical applications to more theoretical topics in physics.
Based on a course taught for years at Oxford, this book offers a concise exposition of the central ideas of general relativity. The focus is on the chain of reasoning that leads to the relativistic theory from the analysis of distance and time measurements in the presence of gravity, rather than on the underlying mathematical structure. Includes links to recent developments, including theoretical work and observational evidence, to encourage further study.
This book provides readers with the tools needed to understand the physical basis of special relativity and will enable a confident mathematical understanding of Minkowski's picture of space-time. It features a large number of examples and exercises, ranging from the rather simple through to the more involved and challenging. Coverage includes acceleration and tensors and has an emphasis on space-time diagrams.
This textbook provides an introduction to general relativity for mathematics undergraduates or graduate physicists. After a review of Cartesian tensor notation and special relativity the concepts of Riemannian differential geometry are introducted. More emphasis is placed on an intuitive grasp of the subject and a calculational facility than on a rigorous mathematical exposition. General relativity is then presented as a relativistic theory of gravity reducing in the appropriate limits to Newtonian gravity or special relativity. The Schwarzchild solution is derived and the gravitational red-shift, time dilation and classic tests of general relativity are discussed. There is a brief account of gravitational collapse and black holes based on the extended Schwarzchild solution. Other vacuum solutions are described, motivated by their counterparts in linearised general relativity. The book ends with chapters on cosmological solutions to the field equations. There are exercises attached to each chapter, some of which extend the development given in the text.
This classic work is now available in an unabridged paperback edition. Stoker makes this fertile branch of mathematics accessible to the nonspecialist by the use of three different notations: vector algebra and calculus, tensor calculus, and the notation devised by Cartan, which employs invariant differential forms as elements in an algebra due to Grassman, combined with an operation called exterior differentiation. Assumed are a passing acquaintance with linear algebra and the basic elements of analysis.
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Differentialgeometrie und Topologie sind wichtige Werkzeuge für die Theoretische Physik. Insbesondere finden sie Anwendung in den Gebieten der Astrophysik, der Teilchen- und Festkörperphysik. Das vorliegende beliebte Buch, das nun erstmals ins Deutsche übersetzt wurde, ist eine ideale Einführung für Masterstudenten und Forscher im Bereich der theoretischen und mathematischen Physik. - Im ersten Kapitel bietet das Buch einen Überblick über die Pfadintegralmethode und Eichtheorien. - Kapitel 2 beschäftigt sich mit den mathematischen Grundlagen von Abbildungen, Vektorräumen und der Topologie. - Die folgenden Kapitel beschäftigen sich mit fortgeschritteneren Konzepten der Geometrie und Topologie und diskutieren auch deren Anwendungen im Bereich der Flüssigkristalle, bei suprafluidem Helium, in der ART und der bosonischen Stringtheorie. - Daran anschließend findet eine Zusammenführung von Geometrie und Topologie statt: es geht um Faserbündel, characteristische Klassen und Indextheoreme (u.a. in Anwendung auf die supersymmetrische Quantenmechanik). - Die letzten beiden Kapitel widmen sich der spannendsten Anwendung von Geometrie und Topologie in der modernen Physik, nämlich den Eichfeldtheorien und der Analyse der Polakov'schen bosonischen Stringtheorie aus einer gemetrischen Perspektive. Mikio Nakahara studierte an der Universität Kyoto und am King’s in London Physik sowie klassische und Quantengravitationstheorie. Heute ist er Physikprofessor an der Kinki-Universität in Osaka (Japan), wo er u. a. über topologische Quantencomputer forscht. Diese Buch entstand aus einer Vorlesung, die er während Forschungsaufenthalten an der University of Sussex und an der Helsinki University of Sussex gehalten hat.
This book is written for theoretical and mathematical physicists and mat- maticians interested in recent developments in complex general relativity and their application to classical and quantum gravity. Calculations are presented by paying attention to those details normally omitted in research papers, for pedagogical r- sons. Familiarity with fibre-bundle theory is certainly helpful, but in many cases I only rely on two-spinor calculus and conformally invariant concepts in gravitational physics. The key concepts the book is devoted to are complex manifolds, spinor techniques, conformal gravity, ?-planes, ?-surfaces, Penrose transform, complex 3 1 – – space-time models with non-vanishing torsion, spin- fields and spin- potentials. 2 2 Problems have been inserted at the end, to help the reader to check his und- standing of these topics. Thus, I can find at least four reasons for writing yet another book on spinor and twistor methods in general relativity: (i) to write a textbook useful to - ginning graduate students and research workers, where two-component spinor c- culus is the unifying mathematical language.

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