The text's elaborate illumination also brings to life a vibrant artistic center, the Monastery of Gladzor, which long ago disappeared." "The Armenian Gospels of Gladzor includes sixty color reproductions of the manuscript's illuminated pages, ten black-and-white illustrations, and two maps along with an essay that explores the book's artistic richness and theological complexity."--BOOK JACKET.
The text's elaborate illumination also brings to life a vibrant artistic center, the Monastery of Gladzor, which long ago disappeared." "The Armenian Gospels of Gladzor includes sixty color reproductions of the manuscript's illuminated pages, ten black-and-white illustrations, and two maps along with an essay that explores the book's artistic richness and theological complexity."--BOOK JACKET.
For over a thousand years the pre-eminent expression of Armenian culture was the illuminated manuscript--above all, the illustrated Gospel Book. Brilliantly painted and often bound in silver and decorated with jewels, these volumes constitute the principal source of information on the history, religion, language, and art of Armenia. Treasures in Heaven is the first comprehensive introduction in English to the art and history of Armenian manuscript painting. It reveals the degree to which this art form embodies a distinctively Armenian aesthetic and religious experience. Eighty-eight of the most significant examples of Armenian manuscript illumination are reproduced and extensively discussed in the catalog. Essays by a team of international scholars examine each of the principal schools and periods of Armenian illumination--from the earliest surviving works of the seventh century to manuscripts produced by the Armenian Diaspora communities during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Chapters on the history and religion of Armenia place illuminated manuscripts within the broader context of Armenian culture. The distinctive techniques and materials of Armenian manuscript painting and bookbinding are also explained. Contributors to this volume include Helen C. Evans, Nina G. Garsoian, Thomas F. Mathews, Krikor H. Maksoudian, Sylvie L. Merian, Mary Virginia Orna, and Alice Taylor.
Truly collaborative paintings, that is, not simply mechanical but also conceptual co-productions, are rare in the history of art. This gorgeously illustrated catalogue explores just such an extraordinary partnership between Antwerp's most eminent painters of the early seventeenth century, Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640) and Jan Brueghel the Elder (1568-1625). Rubens and Brueghel executed approximately twenty-five works together between around 1597 and Brueghel's death in 1625. Highly prized and sought after by collectors throughout Europe, the collaborative works of Rubens and Brueghel were distinguished by an extremely high level of quality, further enhanced by the status of the artists themselves. Published to coincide with an exhibition at the Getty Museum to be held July 5 to September 24, 2006, the catalogue features twenty-six color plates of such Rubens/Brueghel paintings as The Return from War, The Feast of Achelo�s, and Madonna and Child in a Garland of Flowers, along with Rubens and Brueghel's collaborations with important contemporaries such as Frans Snyders and Hendrick van Balen. This is the first such publication to fully address and reproduce these works in depth.
In recent years, interest in old photographs has grown significantly among a broad public, from collectors, conservators, and archivists to amateurs seeking to preserve precious family albums. Although the medium of photography is barely 150 years old, its relatively brief history has witnessed the birth of a wide range of photographic processes, each of which poses unique conservation challenges. Photographs of the Past: Processes and Preservation provides a comprehensive introduction to the practice of photograph preservation, bringing together more information on photographic processes than any other single source. Introductory chapters cover issues of terminology; the rest of the book is divided into three parts: positives, negatives, and conservation. Each chapter focuses on a single process--daguerreotypes, albumen negatives, black-and-white prints, and so on--providing an overview of its history and materials and tracing the evolution of its technology. This book will serve as an irreplaceable reference work for conservators, curators, collectors, dealers, conservation students, and photographers, as well as those in the general public seeking information on preserving this ubiquitous form of cultural heritage.
Life and work of the French photographer Camille Silvy (1834-1910).
Due to the technological advances of the nineteenth century, an abundance of black drawing media exploded onto the market. Charcoal, conte crayon, and fabricated black chalks and crayons; fixatives; various papers; and many lifting devices gave rise to an unprecedented amount of experimentation. Indeed, innovation became the rule, as artists developed their own unique—and often experimental—processes. The exploration of black media in drawing is inextricably bound up with the exploration of black in prints, and this volume presents an integrated study that rises above specialization in one over the other. Noir brings together such diverse artists as Francisco de Goya, Maxime Lalanne, Gustave Courbet, Odilon Redon, and Georges Seurat and explores their inventive works on paper. Sidelining labels like “conservative” or “avant-garde,” the essays in this book employ all the tools that art history and modern conservation have given us, inviting the reader to look more broadly at the artists’ methods and materials. This volume accompanies an eponymous exhibition on view at the J. Paul Getty Museum from February 9 to May 15, 2016.
In the wake of the Counter-Reformation, Cardinal Gabriele Paleotti, the archbishop of Bologna, wrote a remarkable treatise on art during a time when the Church feared rampant abuse in the arts. Translated into English here for the first time, Paleotti's Discourse on Sacred and Profane Images argues that art should address a broad audience and explains the painter's responsibility to his spectators. The Discourse is introduced by historian Paolo Prodi, who explains how—even if the archbishop did not succeed in reforming the arts—Paleotti's treatise constituted one last synthesis of art as a reading of creation and salvation history, and “sacred” art as a vehicle of devotion.
Armenia was the first country to recognize Christianity as the official state religion in 301 AD, twelve years before Constantine's decree granting tolerance to Christianity within the Roman Empire. Ever since, Armenia has claimed the privilege of being the first Christian nation, and the wealth of Christian art produced in Armenia since then is testimony to the fundamental importance of the Christian faith to the Armenian people. This extensive new survey of Armenian Christian art, published to accompany a major exhibition at The British Library, celebrates the Christian art tradition in Armenia during the last 1700 years. The extraordinary quality and range of Armenian art which is documented includes sculpture, metalwork, textiles, ceramics, wood carvings and illuminated manuscripts and has been drawn together from collections throughout the world—many of the examples have never before been seen outside Armenia. In his authoritative text, Dr. Vrej Nersessian, Curator at The British Library, charts the development of Christianity in Armenia. This fascinating history is essential to an understanding of the art and religious tradition of Armenia, a country in which the sense of the sacred extends well beyond the purely religious, infiltrating the entire fabric of Armenian affairs to create a fascinating culture. This sumptuously illustrated book will be of immense value to anyone with an interest in Byzantine art and culture, the history of Christianity and the history of Armenia and the Middle Orient.
"Exploring a defining moment of cultural encounter, this book offers points of departure for a comparative archaeology of empire. While many studies dwell on the Aztec gods and the bloody rituals performed in their horror, The Aztec Pantheon examines little-known episodes in which classicism mediated a dialogue both within and between Mesoamerica and Spain. The Spanish imagination of Rome and the memory of the Iberian Peninsula as a province of the Roman Empire were used to forge new understandings of Mexican society as well as to guide and critique Spain's imperial aims in the New World. The authors engage contemporary approaches to cross-cultural analogy, which sheds light on the function of monumental arts, religious spectacles, and consciously classicizing traditions within empires."--BOOK JACKET.
Known for their stunning displays of artistry and technique, Italian illuminated manuscripts have long been coveted by collectors around the world. The J. Paul Getty Museum holds the most recently formed institutional collection of its kind in the United States, yet it spans more than eight centuries and reflects many of the extraordinary achievements of the Italian tradition. Made up of whole manuscripts as well as leaves and cuttings, the Getty collection of Italian illumination contains nearly sixty works and includes the Montecassino Breviary, the Ferrarese Gualenghi-d’Este Hours, and the Roman gradual illuminated by Antonio da Monza for Santa Maria in Aracoeli. Other important acquisitions are one of the finest Bolognese Bibles of the thirteenth century; three leaves from the Laudario of Sant’Agnese, the most ambitious Florentine manuscript from the first half of the fourteenth century; and a missal once owned by the antipope John XXIII. This beautifully illustrated volume presents many splendid examples of Italian painting and illumination. Some are by noted artists such as Girolamo da Cremona, Pacino di Bonaguida, and Pisanello; others are attributed to artists known only by their works, such as the Master of Gerona, who is credited with one of the finest miniatures in the collection. This carefully crafted book is sure to become an essential resource for scholars, students, and collectors.
Step back in time to seventeenth-century Paris with Thérèse, a talented young girl who lives and works at the Gobelins Manufactory, where Europe’s greatest artisans make tapestries and luxury objects for King Louis XIV. Even though girls are not trained on the great looms there, Thérèse practices on a small one at home and dreams of becoming a royal weaver someday. This charming story follows Thérèse as she carries out an ambitious plan with the help of family, friends, and the artisans of the Gobelins. The intricate craft of tapestry weaving is illuminated, and surprises await Thérèse, her parents and brothers, and even the king himself. Children’s book author Alexandra S. D. Hinrichs here breathes vivid life into a delightful tale full of fun twists and an appealing cast of characters. Original paintings by award-winning artist Renée Graef playfully illustrate the book, as well as the many steps involved in the creation of the famous Gobelins tapestries, from dyeing wool and making silver thread, to painting and copying the elaborate designs, to the delicate art of weaving. Thérèse’s fictional adventures are inspired by real people, the actual Gobelins Manufactory, and a beautiful tapestry that hangs today in the J. Paul Getty Museum.
"Preimesberger's incisive and erudite analysis of social history, biography, rhetoric, art theory, wordplay, and history illuminates these works anew, thus affording a modern audience a better understanding of the subtleties of their composition and meaning."--Jacket.
In the seventeenth century, the Persian city of Isfahan was a crossroads of international trade and diplomacy. Manuscript paintings produced within the city’s various cultural, religious, and ethnic groups reveal the vibrant artistic legacy of the Safavid Empire. Published to coincide with an exhibition at the Getty Museum, Book Arts of Isfahan offers a fascinating account of the ways in which the artists of Isfahan used their art to record the life around them and at the same time define their own identities within a complex society.
European historian Corboz takes the previous European analyses of the American city to task, centering his critical eye on the terrain of postmodern Los Angeles.
The Bible in the Armenian Tradition provides a concise historical account of the development of the Bible in Armenia and the illustrative traditions that are represented in surviving codices. The author focuses on the origins of the first translations of the Bible into Armenian in the fourth century, which inspired the Armenian alphabet itself. A range of beautiful Armenian Bible manuscripts from collections throughout the world are illustrated in full color and compared with western Bible illuminations. Later printed Armenian Bibles are also examined in detail, revealing fascinating examples of religious differences between the Armenian and the Catholic Christian traditions. This survey of Armenian Bible history is an important reference for biblical scholars and anyone with an interest in the history of Christianity.
Explores the revolution in the visual arts that took place between the 3rd and 6th centuries AD, during which time the ancient gods, goddesses and heroes who had populated the imagination of humankind for hundreds of years were replaced by a new imagery of
With images culled from eleven hundred years of history, this comprehensive survey explores the Byzantine empire’s vast range of artistic splendors that indelibly informed the art of modern Europe. Renowned scholar Thomas Mathews emphasizes that the Byzantines’ interest in humanism and painting the human figure became the essential bridge between classical and renaissance Europe. Starting with a brief history of Byzantium as a basis for understanding Byzantine theology and art, he places the empire’s artistic development within a broad cultural and historical context. Featuring more than one hundred color plates of mosaics, metalwork, architecture, frescoes and religious artifacts, as well as maps, diagrams, and a timeline, this definitive work provides a complete yet succinct introduction to the full range of Byzantine art and iconography.
This is the first monographic study of a single Armenian manuscript, the Glajor Gospel, a fourteenth-century illuminated manuscript. In addition to critical studies of the iconography of the illuminations, Mathews and Sanjian provide the history of the Glajor Gospel and the political and cultural setting in which it was produced, as well as the history of the monastery and school of Glajor. All full-page illuminations from the Gospel are reproduced at their original size, with twenty-four color illustrations.

Best Books