'Sometimes it feels like I might be the only person awake in the whole country. People might find that a lonely thought. Not me...' As the rest of the world sleeps, the Gritterman goes out to work. Through the wind and the snow and the freezing cold, in the blue-black hours when time slips away, he grits the paths and the pavements and the roads. For him, there is romance in the winter and comfort in his purpose. But what would a life without gritting mean? A song for the unsung hero, this is a bittersweet story about stoicism, dignity and a man leaving behind the work that he loves. It is accompanied by the author's own illustrations.
FINANCIAL TIMES BOOK OF THE YEAR 2017 'Extraordinary and original' Raymond Briggs 'Sometimes it feels like I might be the only person awake in the whole country. People might find that a lonely thought. Not me...' As the rest of the world sleeps, the Gritterman goes out to work. Through the wind and the snow. Through the blue-black hours when time slips away, he grits the paths and the pavements and the roads. For him, a life without gritting is no life at all... A song for the unsung hero, this is a story about stoicism, dignity and a man leaving behind the work that he loves. It is accompanied by the author's own illustrations. **Listen to or download The Gritterman's companion album featuring 10 new tracks by Orlando Weeks. Available now on all digital and streaming platforms.**
Sometimes it feels like I might be the only person awake in the whole country. People might find that a lonely thought. Not me . . . ' As the rest of the world sleeps, the Gritterman goes out to work. Through the wind and the snow and the freezing cold, in the blue-black hours when time slips away, he grits the paths and the pavements and the roads. For him, there is romance in the winter and comfort in his purpose. But what would a life without gritting mean? A song for the unsung hero, this is a bittersweet story about stoicism, dignity and a man leaving behind the work that he loves. It is accompanied by the author's own illustrations.
A poignant story filled with heart-warming courage as a young girl takes on a harrowing journey to be reunited with her mother. Ami lives on Culion, an island in the Philippines for people who have leprosy. Her mother is among the infected. Ami loves her home: with its blue seas and lush forests, Culion contains all she knows and loves. But the arrival of malicious government official Mr. Zamora changes her world forever. Islanders untouched by sickness are forced to leave for a neighboring island, where the children are placed in an orphanage. Banished across the sea, Ami is desperate to return to Culion before her mother's death. She finds a strange and fragile hope in a colony of butterflies. Can they lead her home before it's too late? Heartrending yet hopeful, celebrated newcomer Kiran Hargrave's novel is a story about loss, perseverence, and faith.
A collection of traditional English, Irish, and Scottish songs and folktales, retold in graphic novel form by some of today's top fantasy writers, includes Neil Gaiman's "The False Knight on the Road," Sharyn McCrumb's "Thomas the Rhymer," and Jane Yolen's "King Henry" and "The Great Selchie of Sule Skerrie." Reprint. 25,000 first printing.
This striking, richly illustrated edition of long-lost German fairy tales is not a book for children. It is a book for adults. Or for adults to frighten children into behaving...whichever you prefer. In 2009, a trove of lost fairy tales collected by Franz Xaver von Schönwerth--a 19th-century collector of Bavarian folk tales and contemporary of the Brothers Grimm--was unearthed in a municipal archive in Germany. Unlike the Grimms, who polished the stories they collected, adapting to contemporary tastes, von Schönwerth recorded the stories as they were told, plucking them directly from the living, breathing tree of oral storytelling, retaining their darker themes and sometimes shocking violence. Von Schönwerth published a single volume of these tales in his lifetime, but the vast majority languished and were forgotten over the years, effectively frozen in time until their recent rediscovery. Now, award-winning illustrator Willow Dawson, in collaboration with translator Shelley Tanaka, has brought these long-lost tales unforgettably to life, illuminating with striking woodcut-style illustrations a spectacular collection that will change the way you look at fairy tales forever. Paired with Dawson's arresting artwork, the stories in White as Milk, Red as Blood race with palpable energy through fantasy landscapes darker, bawdier and racier than anything we find in Disney or the Grimms. Following the tradition of illustrated fairy-tale collections, White as Milk, Red as Blood is the very first fully illustrated, full-colour edition of Franz Xaver von Schönwerth's work. It is a timeless tome of enchantment and foreboding: tales--as haunting as they are profound--of powerful princesses, helpless men, lecherous villains, virtuous girls, witches, giants, at least one female serial killer, mer-people, shape-shifters and talking beasts--a kaleidoscope of wonders both familiar and entirely new; rich and strange. Dawson and Tanaka's dark and lively take on von Schönwerth's collected tales will appeal to fans of Mike Mignola's classic fantasy comic-book series Hellboy.
This updated, expanded, and oversized inspirational resource presents 1,100 color palettes, with light, bright, dark, and muted varieties for each one, making it the most expansive palette selection tool available. Color Index XL provides aspiring designers, artists, and creative individuals working with color with an indispensable, one-stop method for reviewing and selecting current, up-to-date color palettes for their creative projects. Designer and lecturer Jim Krause's classic resource is back with a new approach that presents each group of palettes in an oversized form for easy visual review, and bleeding to the edge of the page (edge indexing) for quick access. By providing variations for each palette, Krause ensures that creatives can find the best color selection for each project's needs. This book serves as the perfect resource for teachers, students, and professionals of all kinds in the art and design space who want to stay up-to-date on the ever-evolving trends in color.
From Carnegie Award-winning author Sarah Crossan comes a poignant and thought-provoking novel that explores life, death, love and forgiveness. Seventeen-year-old Joe hasn't seen his brother in ten years. Ed didn't walk out on the family, not exactly. It's something more brutal. Ed's locked up -- on death row. Now his execution date has been set, and the clock is ticking. Joe is determined to spend those last weeks with his brother, no matter what other people think ... and no matter whether Ed committed the crime. But did he? And does it matter, in the end? This poignant, timely, heartbreaking novel asks big questions: What value do you place on life? What can you forgive? And just how do you say goodbye? Acclaim for Sarah Crossan 2016 Carnegie Award winner, One Shortlisted for the 2016 FCBG Book Award, Apple and Rain Shortlisted for the 2015 Carnegie Award, Apple and Rain Shortlisted for the 2013 Carnegie Award, The Weight of Water
Meet Norman. Norman is normal--perfectly normal. That's until he grows a pair of wings! Norman loves his new wings, but he's worried about everyone will think. After all, they're definitely NOT normal. Norman decides to cover them with a big coat, but hiding such a big part of his life makes him feel miserable. Can Norman find the courage to be himself? This bold and uplifting book is about daring to be different and celebrating what makes you--YOU!
Megg the witch, Mogg the cat, their friend Owl, and Werewolf Jones struggle unsuccessfully with their depression, drug use, sexuality, poverty, lack of ambition, and their complex feelings about each other. It’s a laff riot! Megg and Mogg decide to take a trip to Amsterdam for some quality couple time, although the trip gets off to a rocky start when they forget their antidepressants. They need Owl to come and help them save their relationship. But why does he have a suitcase full of glass dildos? And what will they do when they realize that the housesitting Werewolf Jones has turned their apartment into a “f#@k zone”? Megg & Mogg in Amsterdam collects all of Simon Hanselmann’s contributions to Vice.com, the Ignatz Award-nominated short story “St. Owl’s Bay,” and other surprises that will add additional color and background for fans of Megahex.
A haunting, original fairy tale from two dazzling debut picture book talents, in the spirit of Neil Gaiman and Carson Ellis. Hortense is a kind and brave girl, but she is sad--even angry--that her shadow follows her everywhere she goes. She hates her shadow, and thinks her shadow must hate her too. But one cold, dark night, when bandits surprise her in the woods, Hortense discovers that her shadow is the very thing she needs most. This stunningly illustrated story stirs the soul with its compelling, subtle exploration of self-esteem, self-identity, and finding inner strength.
Music as an Art begins by examining music through a philosophical lens, engaging in discussions about tonality, music and the moral life, music and cognitive science and German idealism, as well as recalling the author's struggle to encourage his students to distinguish the qualities of good music. Scruton then explains – via erudite chapters on Schubert, Britten, Rameau, opera and film – how we can develop greater judgement in music, recognising both good taste and bad, establishing musical values, as well as musical pleasures. As Scruton argues in this book, in earlier times, our musical culture had secure foundations in the church, the concert hall and the home; in the ceremonies and celebrations of ordinary life, religion and manners. Yet we no longer live in that world. Fewer people now play instruments and music is, for many, a form of largely solitary enjoyment. As he shows in Music as an Art, we live at a critical time for classical music, and this book is an important contribution to the debate, of which we stand in need, concerning the place of music in Western civilization.
Discover what it means to be wild!
The sky speaks on the frozen island of Skane. Beautiful lights appear and their colours have meaning: Green means all is well, blue means a snowstorm is coming. And then there's red: Rare. A warning. When the sky last shone red, a terrible plague came to the island - this time around, can our heroine Osa prevent so many lives being lost again?
An utterly hilarious Seussian picture book—with a surprise ending—about a mischievous little boy who gobbles up everything in the whole entire world, except for one very important thing. . . . When Danny McGee, much to his big sister Frannie's surprise, drinks up the sea with a giant straw, it turns out he's just getting started. Soon nothing is safe from getting swallowed whole by Danny McGee—not the mountains, not the trees, not even the weather girl on TV! He eats up America and all the people in the whole world (including the author, who is writing this book from inside Danny McGee!). Danny swallows the alphabet and all the numbers, until there is absolutely nothing left . . . except, of course, his big sister, Frannie McGee. Absurdist humor throughout, along with a delicious twist at the end, will have kids laughing uncontrollably at this one-of-a-kind picture book. Praise for the work of illustrator Neal Layton: "Layton's playful mixed-media illustrations evoke Ludwig Bemelmans and John Burningham. They're fresh and funny, providing plenty to pore over." —Kirkus Reviews "[This] whimsical tale is given ample comic dimension by Neal's zany and inventive mixed-media illustrations." —Publishers Weekly
Perfect for all kinds of correspondence, this charming keepsake box is packed with quirky, watercolor notecards and stickers by artist and tastemaker Todd Selby. With everything from hamburgers and spaceships to the Eiffel Tower, The Selby's Box of Wonders will keep letter writers busy and wanting more!
"A leader in innovative design and architecture illustrates the many biases hidden in the designs of everyday products and spaces and argues for more diversity"--
A Pussy Rioter’s riveting, hallucinatory account of her years in Russia’s criminal system and of finding power in the most powerless of situations In February 2012, after smuggling an electric guitar into Moscow’s iconic central cathedral, Maria Alyokhina and other members of the radical collective Pussy Riot performed a provocative “Punk Prayer,” taking on the Orthodox church and its support for Vladimir Putin’s authoritarian regime. For this, they were charged with “organized hooliganism” and were tried while confined in a cage and guarded by Rottweilers. That trial and Alyokhina’s subsequent imprisonment became an international cause. For Alyokhina, her two-year sentence launched a bitter struggle against the Russian prison system and an iron-willed refusal to be deprived of her humanity. Teeming with protests and police, witnesses and cellmates, informers and interrogators, Riot Days gives voice to Alyokhina’s insistence on the right to say no, whether to a prison guard or to the president. Ultimately, this insistence delivers unprecedented victories for prisoners’ rights. Evocative, wry, laser-sharp, and laconically funny, Alyokhina’s account is studded with song lyrics, legal transcripts, and excerpts from her jail diary—dispatches from a young woman who has faced tyranny and returned with the proof that against all odds even one person can force its retreat.
It's a dark and lonely Christmas Eve in the dining room of ancient Soul's College. The kitchen boy, 11-year-old Lewis, has helped prepare a highly unusual meal, made with unrecognisable ingredients, cooked by a mysterious chef. And then the guests arrive ... and carnage ensues. They are ex-students of Soul's College, and they are all completely demented. They demand bottle after bottle of wine, flinging their cutlery and howling like banshees until ... silence. The Dean of Soul's College has arrived, and the evening's ceremonies must begin. For this is the annual meeting of a secret club for those who despise children, warmth, happiness, and above all Christmas. Each member must try to outdo the others by telling the most terrible, disgusting story they know. A spooky, shocking, bloodthirsty alternative to festive cheer that will appeal to, fascinate and delight young readers.

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