The Malleus Maleficarum, first published in 1486-7, is the standard medieval text on witchcraft and it remained in print throughout the early modern period. Its descriptions of the evil acts of witches and the ways to exterminate them continue to contribute to our knowledge of early modern law, religion and society. This highly acclaimed translation, based on the translator's extensive research and detailed analysis of the Latin text, is the only complete English version available, and the most reliable.With detailed explanatory notes and a guide to further reading, this volume offers a unique insight into the fifteenth-century mind and its sense of sin, punishment and retribution.
"A handbook for hunting and punishing witches to assist the Inquisition and Church in exterminating undesirables. Mostly a compilation of superstition and folklore, the book was taken very seriously at the time it was written in the 15th century and became a kind of spiritual law book used by judges to determine the guilt of the accused"--From publisher description.
What was witchcraft? Were witches real? How should witches be identified? How should they be judged? Towards the end of the middle ages these were new questions, without answers hallowed by time and authority. Between 1430 and 1500, a number of learned "witch-theorists" attempted to provide the answers, and of these perhaps the most famous are the Dominican inquisitors Heinrich Institoris and Jacob Sprenger, the authors of the Malleus Maleficarum, The Hammer of Witches. This, the first book-length study of the Malleus in English, provides students and scholars with an introduction to this text and to the conceptual world of its authors. Ultimately, this book argues that although the Malleus was a highly idiosyncratic text, with a view of witches very different from that of competing authors, its arguments were powerfully compelling and so remained influential long after alternatives were forgotten.
"Shaman of Oberstdorf tells the fascinating story of a sixteenth-century mountain village caught in a panic of its own making. Four hundred years ago the Bavarian alpine town of Oberstdorf, surrounded by the towering peaks of the Vorarlberg, was awash in legends and rumors of prophets and healers, of spirits and specters, of witches and soothsayers. The book focuses on the life of a horse wrangler named Chonrad Stoeckhlin [1549-1587], whose extraordinary visions of the afterlife and enthusiastic practice of the occult eventually led to his death-and to the death of a number of village women-for crimes of witchcraft. Wolfgang Behringer is one of the premier historians of German witchcraft, not only because of his mastery of the subject at the regional level, but because he also writes movingly, forcefully, and with an eye for the telling anecdote."--Amazon.ca.
Extraordinary document (1608) on witchcraft and demonology offers striking insight into early 17th century mind. Serious discussions of witches’ powers, poisons, crimes, more. Rare limited edition.
This title offers a new translation of the medieval treatise on witchcraft, the Malleus Maleficarum, by the Dominican inquisitor Heinrich Institoris.
Were witches real in the Middle Ages? This handbook on witchcraft, first published in 1628, claims to expose the entire practice and profession of witchcraft. Was used as support in the accusation of witches at the time, although we can recognize much of it today as being paranoid superstition by religious authorities. The book is valuable because it allows one to view the extreme superstition surrounding witchcraft at the time, and to better understand the degree of persecution that resulted.
Full text of most important witchhunter's "bible," used by both Catholics and Protestants. First published in 1486, the book includes everything known at the time about cults, illicit sex, dealings with the devil, and more.
Written by King James I and published in 1597, the original edition of Demonology is widely regarded as one of the most interesting and controversial religious writings in history, yet because it is written in the language of its day, it has been notoriously difficult to understand. Now occult scholar Donald Tyson has modernized and annotated the original text, making this historically important work accessible to contemporary readers. Also deciphered here, for the first time, is the anonymous tract News from Scotland, an account of the North Berwick witch trials over which King James presided. Tyson examines King James’ obsession with witches and their alleged attempts on his life, and offers a knowledgeable and sympathetic look at the details of magick and witchcraft in the Jacobean period. Demonology features historical woodcut illustrations and includes the original old English texts in their entirety. This reference work is the key to an essential source text on seventeenth-century witchcraft and the Scottish witch trials
2011 Reprint of 1928 Edition. The Malleus Maleficarum (Latin for "The Hammer of Witches") is a famous treatise on witches, written in 1486 by Heinrich Kramer, an Inquisitor of the Catholic Church, and was first published in Germany in 1487. Jacob Sprenger is also often attributed as an author. The main purpose of the Malleus was to attempt to systematically refute arguments claiming that witchcraft does not exist, discredit those who expressed skepticism about its reality, to claim that witches were more often women than men, and to educate magistrates on the procedures that could find them out and convict them. This edition of Malleus Maleficarum is here translated into English for the first time. It contains a note upon the bibliography of the Malleus Maleficarum and includes bibliographical references. Translated, with introductions, bibliography and notes by Montague Summers.
This book is the first in English devoted to Francois Duquesnoy, a central figure in seventeenth-century European sculpture, a rival to Bernini, and a leading light in an artistic milieu that included Poussin and Rubens. Estelle Lingo reconstructs Duquesnoy's pursuit in Rome of a modern artistic practice "in the Greek manner." Reconstruction of Duquesnoy's Greek ideal enables Lingo to offer new interpretations of his exquisite marble and bronze sculptures. Moreover, she demonstrates that the archeological and poetic vision of Greek art developed by Duquesnoy and his circle formed the basis of Johann Joachim Winclemann's influential Reflections on the Imitation of Greek Works in Painting and Sculpture - thus overturning the long-held assumption that no meaningful distinction was made between ancient Greek and Roman art prior to Winckelmann's work in the eighteenth century. Examining in detail how Duquesnoy developed and employed his "Greek manner," Lingo brings to light the extent of his contributions to European culture and aesthetics, and to the rise of Neoclassicism.
Offering a selection of historical writing on witchcraft, this text explores how belief in witchcraft began and the social and cultural context in which this belief flourished. A range of historical perspectives is collected here.
The essays in this Handbook, written by leading scholars working in the rapidly developing field of witchcraft studies, explore the historical literature regarding witch beliefs and witch trials in Europe and colonial America between the early fifteenth and early eighteenth centuries. During these years witches were thought to be evil people who used magical power to inflict physical harm or misfortune on their neighbours. Witches were also believed to have made pacts with the devil and sometimes to have worshipped him at nocturnal assemblies known as sabbaths. These beliefs provided the basis for defining witchcraft as a secular and ecclesiastical crime and prosecuting tens of thousands of women and men for this offence. The trials resulted in as many as fifty thousand executions. These essays study the rise and fall of witchcraft prosecutions in the various kingdoms and territories of Europe and in English, Spanish, and Portuguese colonies in the Americas. They also relate these prosecutions to the Catholic and Protestant reformations, the introduction of new forms of criminal procedure, medical and scientific thought, the process of state-building, profound social and economic change, early modern patterns of gender relations, and the wave of demonic possessions that occurred in Europe at the same time. The essays survey the current state of knowledge in the field, explore the academic controversies that have arisen regarding witch beliefs and witch trials, propose new ways of studying the subject, and identify areas for future research.
David Bleich sees the human body, its affective life, social life, and political functions as belonging to the study of language. In The Materiality of Language, Bleich addresses the need to end centuries of limiting access to language and its many contexts of use. To recognize language as material and treat it as such, argues Bleich, is to remove restrictions to language access due to historic patterns of academic censorship and unfair gender practices. Language is understood as a key path in the formation of all social and political relations, and becomes available for study by all speakers, who may regulate it, change it, and make it flexible like other material things.
A fascinating, wide-ranging survey examines the history of possession and exorcism through the ages.
“From Torquemada to Guantánamo and beyond, Cullen Murphy finds the ‘inquisitorial impulse’ alive, and only too well, in our world” (Jane Mayer, author of Dark Money). Established by the Catholic Church in 1231, the Inquisition continued in one form or another for almost seven hundred years. Though associated with the persecution of heretics and Jews—and with burning at the stake—its targets were more numerous, its techniques were more ambitious, and its effect on history has been greater than many understand. The Inquisition pioneered surveillance, censorship, and “scientific” interrogation. As time went on, its methods and mindset spread far beyond the Church to become tools of secular persecution. Traveling from freshly opened Vatican archives to the detention camps of Guantánamo to the filing cabinets of the Third Reich, the author of Are We Rome? “masterfully traces the social, legal and political evolution of the Inquisition and the inquisitorial process from its origins in late medieval Christian France to its eerily familiar, secular cousin in the modern world” (San Francisco Chronicle). “God’s Jury is a reminder, and we need to be constantly reminded, that the most dangerous people in the world are the righteous, and when they wield real power, look out. . . . Murphy wears his erudition lightly, writes with quiet wit, and has a delightful way of seeing the past in the present.” —Mark Bowden, author of Hue 1968 “Beautifully written, very smart, and devilishly engaging.” —The Boston Globe

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