A riveting exploration of how microbes are transforming the way we see nature and ourselves—and could revolutionize agriculture and medicine. Prepare to set aside what you think you know about yourself and microbes. Good health—for people and for plants—depends on Earth’s smallest creatures. The Hidden Half of Nature tells the story of our tangled relationship with microbes and their potential to revolutionize agriculture and medicine, from garden to gut. When David R. Montgomery and Anne Biklé decide to restore life into their barren yard by creating a garden, dead dirt threatens their dream. As a cure, they feed their soil a steady diet of organic matter. The results impress them. In short order, the much-maligned microbes transform their bleak yard into a flourishing Eden. Beneath their feet, beneficial microbes and plant roots continuously exchange a vast array of essential compounds. The authors soon learn that this miniaturized commerce is central to botanical life’s master strategy for defense and health. They are abruptly plunged further into investigating microbes when Biklé is diagnosed with cancer. Here, they discover an unsettling truth. An armada of bacteria (our microbiome) sails the seas of our gut, enabling our immune system to sort microbial friends from foes. But when our gut microbiome goes awry, our health can go with it. The authors also discover startling insights into the similarities between plant roots and the human gut. We are not what we eat. We are all—for better or worse—the product of what our microbes eat. This leads to a radical reconceptualization of our relationship to the natural world: by cultivating beneficial microbes, we can rebuild soil fertility and help turn back the modern plague of chronic diseases. The Hidden Half of Nature reveals how to transform agriculture and medicine—by merging the mind of an ecologist with the care of a gardener and the skill of a doctor.
Hinter jedem fitten Geist steht ein starker Darm Hirntraining mal anders: Der Neurologe und Bestsellerautor Dr. David Perlmutter zeigt anhand neuester wissenschaftlicher Erkenntnisse, dass eine gesunde Darmflora uns vor Konzentrationsproblemen und Allergien und sogar vor schweren neurologischen Erkrankungen wie Alzheimer schützen kann. Schon mit wenigen einfachen Maßnahmen können Sie Ihre Aussicht auf geistige Gesundheit und ein langes, erfülltes Leben deutlich verbessern.
Eine hinreißende Geschichte über Pflanzen, Liebe und die Wissenschaft Hope Jahren hat das, wovon viele Menschen träumen: einen Beruf, der ihr Herz und ihr Leben erfüllt. Seit sie denken kann, ist die Geo-Biologin fasziniert von der Natur – von Pflanzen, Bäumen, Blättern, Samenkörnern und den unglaublichen Geschichten, die sie uns erzählen, sogar noch in fossiler Form. Wie ist es beispielsweise möglich, dass ein Kirschkern hundert Jahre lang geduldig warten kann, bis er sich auf einmal dazu entscheidet zu keimen? Hope Jahrens Werdegang von der kindlichen Forscherin zur angesehenen Wissenschaftlerin, die sich trotz zahlreicher Hindernisse in einer Männerwelt behauptet, ist eine inspirierende und mitreißende Geschichte voller Leidenschaft, Durchhaltevermögen und ewiger Neugierde. Ein wunderbares Gleichnis über die Kraft der Natur und die Freude des Entdeckens, das einen ganz neuen Blick auf die Pflanzenwelt eröffnet. Seite für Seite. Blatt für Blatt. Für die New York Times ist Hope Jahrens »Blattgeflüster« eines der 100 besten Bücher des Jahres 2016.
Ein neuer Blick auf alte Freunde Erstaunliche Dinge geschehen im Wald: Bäume, die miteinander kommunizieren. Bäume, die ihren Nachwuchs, aber auch alte und kranke Nachbarn liebevoll umsorgen und pflegen. Bäume, die Empfindungen haben, Gefühle, ein Gedächtnis. Unglaublich? Aber wahr! – Der Förster Peter Wohlleben erzählt faszinierende Geschichten über die ungeahnten und höchst erstaunlichen Fähigkeiten der Bäume. Dazu zieht er die neuesten wissenschaftlichen Erkenntnisse ebenso heran wie seine eigenen unmittelbaren Erfahrungen mit dem Wald und schafft so eine aufregend neue Begegnung für die Leser: Wir schließen Bekanntschaft mit einem Lebewesen, das uns vertraut schien, uns aber hier erstmals in seiner ganzen Lebendigkeit vor Augen tritt. Und wir betreten eine völlig neue Welt ...
NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER For the first time ever, an international coalition of leading researchers, scientists and policymakers has come together to offer a set of realistic and bold solutions to climate change. All of the techniques described here - some well-known, some you may have never heard of - are economically viable, and communities throughout the world are already enacting them. From revolutionizing how we produce and consume food to educating girls in lower-income countries, these are all solutions which, if deployed collectively on a global scale over the next thirty years, could not just slow the earth's warming, but reach drawdown: the point when greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere peak and begin todecline. So what are we waiting for?
It’s all but certain that the next fifty years will bring enormous, not to say cataclysmic, disruptions to our present way of life. World oil reserves will be exhausted within that time frame, as will the lithium that powers today’s most sophisticated batteries, suggesting that transportation is equally imperiled. And there’s another, even more dire limitation that is looming: at current rates of erosion, the world’s topsoil will be gone in sixty years. Fresh water sources are in jeopardy, too. In short, the large-scale agricultural and food delivery system as we know it has at most a few decades before it exhausts itself and the planet with it. Farming for the Long Haul is about building a viable small farm economy that can withstand the economic, political, and climatic shock waves that the twenty-first century portends. It draws on the innovative work of contemporary farmers, but more than that, it shares the experiences of farming societies around the world that have maintained resilient agricultural systems over centuries of often-turbulent change. Indigenous agriculturalists, peasants, and traditional farmers have all created broad strategies for survival through good times and bad, and many of them prospered. They also developed particular techniques for managing soil, water, and other resources sustainably. Some of these techniques have been taken up by organic agriculture and permaculture, but many more of them are virtually unknown, even among alternative farmers. This book lays out some of these strategies and presents techniques and tools that might prove most useful to farmers today and in the uncertain future.
Ein Jahr - ein Projekt: Wie wird man der glücklichste Mensch der Welt? Alexandra Reinwarth ist eigentlich ganz zufrieden. Sie hat einen guten Job. Einen netten Mann. Gute Freunde. Aber manchmal, wenn sie einschläft, fragt sie sich: Bin ich wirklich glücklich? Also wagt sie ein ungewöhnliches Experiment. Sie macht ein Jahr lang alles, um wirklich glücklich zu werden. Sie besucht einen Glückscoach, unternimmt eine Wallfahrt, fängt mit Sport an, singt in der Dusche, kümmert sich um ihre Freunde, kauft sich ein Haustier, entrümpelt ihre Wohnung, probiert allerlei Glücksdrogen und fahndet ausgiebig nach dem Sinn des Lebens. Alles, was es über Glück zu wissen gibt, steht in diesem Buch. Der ultimative Glücksratgeber!
ÄDreckä - damit ist fruchtbare Erde gemeint, die als dünne Haut unseren Planeten bedeckt und den Menschen ernährt. Der Autor beschreibt eindrucksvoll die Geschichte des menschlichen Umgangs mit dem fruchtbaren Boden, die Gefahr seiner Zerstörung und die Möglichkeiten des nachhaltigen Umgangs damit.
We rely on chemical cures to keep our bodies free from disease and our farm fields free from bugs and weeds. While human and agricultural health are rarely considered together, both are based on the same ecology, and both are being threatened by organisms that have evolved to resist our antibiotics and pesticides. Fortunately scientists are finding new solutions that work with, rather than against, nature. There are viruses that bust apart bacteria; insect pheromones that throw crop destroying moths into a misguided sexual frenzy; plant genes edited to protect against disease; and a resurgence of the ancient practice of fecal transplants. In this hopeful book, Monosson offers a fascinating look into the future of natural defenses.
A MacArthur Fellow’s impassioned call to make agriculture sustainable by ditching the plow, covering the soil, and diversifying crop rotations. The problem of agriculture is as old as civilization. Throughout history, great societies that abused their land withered into poverty or disappeared entirely. Now we risk repeating this ancient story on a global scale due to ongoing soil degradation, a changing climate, and a rising population. But there is reason for hope. David R. Montgomery introduces us to farmers around the world at the heart of a brewing soil health revolution that could bring humanity’s ailing soil back to life remarkably fast. Growing a Revolution draws on visits to farms in the industrialized world and developing world to show that a new combination of farming practices can deliver innovative, cost-effective solutions to problems farmers face today. Cutting through standard debates about conventional and organic farming, Montgomery explores why practices based on the principles of conservation agriculture help restore soil health and fertility. Farmers he visited found it both possible and profitable to stop plowing up the soil and blanketing fields with chemicals. Montgomery finds that the combination of no-till planting, cover crops, and diverse crop rotations provides the essential recipe to rebuild soil organic matter. Farmers using these unconventional practices cultivate beneficial soil life, smother weeds, and suppress pests while relying on far less, if any, fertilizer and pesticides. These practices are good for farmers and the environment. Using less fossil fuel and agrochemicals while maintaining crop yields helps farmers with their bottom line. Regenerative practices also translate into farms that use less water, generate less pollution, lower carbon emissions—and stash an impressive amount of carbon underground. Combining ancient wisdom with modern science, Growing a Revolution lays out a solid case for an inspiring vision where agriculture becomes the solution to environmental problems, helping feed us all, cool the planet, and restore life to the land.
Richard Prestons populärwissenschaftlicher Tatsachen-Thriller liest sich spannender als jeder Horror-Roman. Preston berichtet darin über die ersten Infektionen mit dem Ebola-Virus vor über vierzig Jahren. Sein Tatsachenthriller von 1998 ist immer noch hochaktuell, wie die schreckliche Ebola-Epidemie in Zentralafrika gerade zeigt. Ebola gehört zu den gefährlichsten Killerviren. Diese aus dem Afrikanischen Regenwald stammenden sogenannten „Filoviren“, können einen Menschen auf grausamste Art und Weise töten. Das Virus löst innerhalb weniger Tage die inneren Organe auf, und der Erkrankte verblutet von innen. Das Virus ist zudem extrem ansteckend, und weltweit gibt es immer noch kein wirksames Heilmittel dagegen. Deshalb ist es nicht auszuschließen, dass die Menschheit eines Tages einer Seuche wie Ebola erliegen könnte. Preston schildert, wie der Ebola-Erreger über Affen, die für medizinische Versuche importiert wurden, schließlich nach Amerika kommt. In einem kleinen Labor in Reston, USA, verbreitet er Angst und Schrecken. Als sich die Seuche unter den im Quarantänelager zusammengepferchten Affen ausbreitet, rufen die Betreiber der Anlage die Gesundheitsbehörden zu Hilfe. Bald müssen die Wissenschaftler feststellen, dass sich das Virus inzwischen nicht nur durch Kontakt, sondern auch durch die Luft verbreiten kann.
Schauen Sie hinter die Kulissen von Mutter Natur. Tauchen Sie ein in die faszinierende Welt der Pflanzen, Tiere, Bakterien und Co. Erfahren Sie von Rene Fester Kratz und Donna Rae Siegfried, wie die Photosynthese abluft, was bei der Zellteilung passiert, wie ein kosystem funktioniert und vieles mehr. Lassen Sie sich die Grundlagen der Genetik und Evolutionslehre erklren und bestaunen Sie die wichtigsten Entdeckungen in der Biologie. Sie werden sehen: Die Wissenschaft des Lebens ist eine spannende Sache!
Uns modernen Menschen erscheint die Sesshaftigkeit so natürlich wie dem Fisch das Wasser. Wie selbstverständlich gehen wir und auch weite Teile der historischen Forschung davon aus, dass die neolithische Revolution, in deren Verlauf der Mensch seine nomadische Existenz aufgab und zum Ackerbauer und Viehzüchter wurde, ein bedeutender zivilisatorischer Fortschritt war, dessen Früchte wir noch heute genießen. James C. Scott erzählt in seinem provokanten Buch eine ganz andere Geschichte. Gestützt auf archäologische Befunde, entwickelt er die These, dass die ersten bäuerlichen Staaten aus der Kontrolle über die Reproduktion entstanden und ein hartes Regime der Domestizierung errichteten, nicht nur mit Blick auf Pflanzen und Tiere. Auch die Bürger samt ihrer Sklaven und Frauen wurden der Herrschaft dieser frühesten Staaten unterworfen. Sie brachte Strapazen, Epidemien, Ungleichheiten und Kriege mit sich. Einzig die »Barbaren« haben sich gegen die Mühlen der Zivilisation gestemmt, sich der Sesshaftigkeit und den neuen Besteuerungssystemen verweigert und damit der Unterordnung unter eine staatliche Macht. Sie sind die heimlichen Helden dieses Buches, das unseren Blick auf die Menschheitsgeschichte verändert.
Die internationale Klimapolitik ist an einem Wendepunkt angekommen. Die Annahme des Kyoto-Protokolls ist ein großer Schritt in dem Versuch der Menschheit, die schädlichen Folgen des Klimawandels zu begrenzen. Dieses Buch, geschrieben von zwei deutschen Experten, erklärt die naturwissenschaftlichen, ökonomischen sowie politischen Bedingungen desTreibhauseffekts und erläutert die Hintergründe der Annahme des Kyoto-Protokolls. Das Buch analysiert in seinem Mittelteil den Vertragstext im Stile eines Gesetzeskommentars, nennt die offenen Fragen und gibt mögliche Antworten für die Weiterentwicklung der Normen. In einem dritten Teil werden Schlussfolgerungen gezogen, die politische Landschaft nach Kyoto beleuchtet und eine Leadership-Initiative für die Europäische Union vorgestellt, um die Handlungsmacht gegenüber den USA wieder zu erlangen.
Auf fünf Erdteilen war Roger Willemsen unterwegs, um seine ganz persönlichen Enden der Welt zu finden. Manchmal waren es die großen geographischen: das Kap in Südafrika, Patagonien, der Himalaja, die Südsee, der Nordpol. Manchmal waren es aber auch ganz einzigartige, individuelle Endpunkte: ein Bordellflur in Bombay, ein Bett in Minsk, ein Fresko des Jüngsten Gerichts in Orvieto, eine Behörde im Kongo. Immer aber geht es in diesen grandiosen literarischen Reisebildern auch um ein Enden in anderem Sinn: um ein Ende der Liebe und des Begehrens, der Illusionen, der Ordnung und Verständigung. Um das Ende des Lebens – und um den Neubeginn. Die Eifel: Aufbruch – Der Himalaya: Highway im Nebel – Minsk: Der Fremde im Bett – Timbuktu: Der Junge und die Wüste – Borneo: Die Straße ins Nichts – Tonga: Tabu und Verhängnis – Chiang Mai: Opium – Kamtschatka: Asche und Magma – Mandalay: Ein Traum vom Meer – Bombay: Das Orakel – Patagonien: Der verbotene Ort – Kinshasa: Aus einem Krieg – Hongkong: Das leere Postfach – Indonesien: Unter Toten – Gibraltar: Das Nonplusultra – Senegal: Die Tür ohne Wiederkehr – Der Nordpol: Einkehr ...
Was hat Alexander von Humboldt, der vor mehr als 150 Jahren starb, mit Klimawandel und Nachhaltigkeit zu tun? Der Naturforscher und Universalgelehrte, nach dem nicht nur unzählige Straßen, Pflanzen und sogar ein »Mare« auf dem Mond benannt sind, hat wie kein anderer Wissenschaftler unser Verständnis von Natur als lebendigem Ganzen, als Kosmos, in dem vom Winzigsten bis zum Größten alles miteinander verbunden ist und dessen untrennbarer Teil wir sind, geprägt. Die Historikerin Andrea Wulf stellt in ihrem vielfach preisgekrönten – so auch mit dem Bayerischen Buchpreis 2016 – Buch Humboldts Erfindung der Natur, die er radikal neu dachte, ins Zentrum ihrer Erkundungsreise durch sein Leben und Werk. Sie folgt den Spuren des begnadeten Netzwerkers und zeigt, dass unser heutiges Wissen um die Verwundbarkeit der Erde in Humboldts Überzeugungen verwurzelt ist. Ihm heute wieder zu begegnen, mahnt uns, seine Erkenntnisse endlich zum Maßstab unseres Handelns zu machen – um unser aller Überleben willen.

Best Books