Offers suggestions and strategies for generating high levels of student attention and engagement in the classroom environment. If students are not engaged, there is little, if any, chance that they will learn what is being addressed in class. A basic premise of The Highly Engaged Classroom is that student engagement happens as a result of a teacher s careful planning and execution of specific strategies. In other words, student engagement is not serendipitous. This book was designed as a self-study text that provides an in-depth understanding of how to generate high levels of attention and engagement. Engagement is obviously a central aspect of effective teaching. Using the suggestions presented in this book, every teacher can create a classroom environment in which engagement is the norm instead of the exception. Part of the Classroom Strategies That Work library, this clear, highly practical guide follows the series format, first summarizing key research and then translating it into recommendations for classroom practice. In addition to the explanations and examples of engagement strategies, each chapter includes helpful exercises to reinforce the reader's understanding of the content. Because research and theory can provide only a general direction for classroom practice, The Highly Engaged Classroom (and each book in the series) goes one step further to translate that research into applications for the classroom. Specifically, it addresses four emblematic questions students ask themselves, the answers to which determine how involved students are in classroom activities: How do I feel?, Am I interested?, Is this important?, and Can I do this? For each of these four emblematic questions, specific classroom strategies are provided in chapters 2 through 5.
Featuring updated research, grade-specific individual and group activities, and suggestions for assessment, this resource outlines how teachers can inspire their students to become self-motivated learners.
For more than two decades, the concept of student engagement has grown from simple attention in class to a construct comprised of cognitive, emotional, and behavioral components that embody and further develop motivation for learning. Similarly, the goals of student engagement have evolved from dropout prevention to improved outcomes for lifelong learning. This robust expansion has led to numerous lines of research across disciplines and are brought together clearly and comprehensively in the Handbook of Research on Student Engagement. The Handbook guides readers through the field’s rich history, sorts out its component constructs, and identifies knowledge gaps to be filled by future research. Grounding data in real-world learning situations, contributors analyze indicators and facilitators of student engagement, link engagement to motivation, and gauge the impact of family, peers, and teachers on engagement in elementary and secondary grades. Findings on the effectiveness of classroom interventions are discussed in detail. And because assessing engagement is still a relatively new endeavor, chapters on measurement methods and issues round out this important resource. Topical areas addressed in the Handbook include: Engagement across developmental stages. Self-efficacy in the engaged learner. Parental and social influences on engagement and achievement motivation. The engaging nature of teaching for competency development. The relationship between engagement and high-risk behavior in adolescents. Comparing methods for measuring student engagement. An essential guide to the expanding knowledge base, the Handbook of Research on Student Engagement serves as a valuable resource for researchers, scientist-practitioners, and graduate students in such varied fields as clinical child and school psychology, educational psychology, public health, teaching and teacher education, social work, and educational policy.
Feedback that works—for leadership that makes a difference. Leaders know that feedback is essential to teacher development. Crafting the right feedback, however, can be daunting. This how-to book introduces a dynamic yet practical leadership model that helps leaders in all roles and at all experience levels conduct comprehensive observations, analyze lessons for effectiveness, and develop high-leverage action steps that change practices and outcomes. Features include Comprehensive explanations of standards and discrete core skills Explicit think-alouds, ready-to-use strategies, and field-tested lesson examples Evidence-collection notes—with templates—from live observations Feedback samples across grade levels and content areas Reblicable case studies for professional learning
Design and teach effective learning goals and objectives by following strategies based on the strongest research available. This book includes a summary of key research behind these classroom practices and shows how to implement them using step-by-step hands-on strategies. Short quizzes help readers assess their understanding of the instructional best practices explained in each section.
Learn everything you need to know to implement an integrated system of assessment and grading. The author details the specific benefits of formative assessment and explains how to design and interpret three different types of formative assessments, how to track student progress, and how to assign meaningful grades. Detailed examples bring each concept to life, and chapter exercises reinforce the content.
Drive boredom out of your classroom – and keep it out – with the student-engagement strategies in this book. You’ll learn how to gain and sustain the attention of your students from the moment the bell rings. Perfect for teachers of all subjects and grade levels, these activities go head-to-head with student boredom and disengagement, resulting in class time that’s more efficient, more educational, and loads more fun! Contents include: Strategies to Begin a Lesson Strategies to End a Lesson Strategies for Solo/Independent Work Strategies for the Whole Group Author Bryan Harris, an expert in student engagement and classroom management, has extensive experience in K-12 motivation and brain-based learning. In this book, he brings together 99 simple, ready-to-use ideas for teachers looking to overcome student boredom and illuminate classroom lessons in a dynamic, interactive way. Bonus strategies show you how to engage even the most reluctant learners.
How do you bring research findings into the classroom and how do you find the time to research the research? In this valuable resource, the authors have examined decades of research findings to distill the results into nine categories of teaching strategies that have positive effects on student learning.
Ask targeted questions to enhance students’ reasoning skills and increase rigor in classrooms. Use a four-phase questioning sequence to help students make claims, build sound arguments, and provide evidence to support their points. You’ll discover how to coordinate sequences to elicit students’ prior knowledge, prompt the discovery of new information, and deepen and extend students’ learning in all content areas.
Drive boredom out of your classroom—and keep it out—with the student engagement strategies in this book. In the first Battling Boredom, bestselling author Bryan Harris offered strategies on beginning a lesson, ending a lesson, small group work, and large group work. Now in Battling Boredom Part 2, Harris teams up with technology integration expert and former teacher Lisa Bradshaw to provide additional strategies on new topics such as academic talk, feedback, writing, classroom technology, and more. You’ll learn how to: Increase the quality and effectiveness of feedback to boost student performance. Engage students in meaningful reflection with writing prompts and exercises. Reenergize a lethargic class using movement-based activities. Integrate technology to create a more enriching classroom experience for students. Encourage students to speak up, share their ideas, and talk about their learning. With this toolbox of instructional strategies, you’ll have even more ways to end student boredom before it begins, resulting in class time that’s more efficient, more educational, and loads more fun!
The popular author of Classroom Instruction That Works discusses 10 questions that can help teachers sharpen their craft and do what really works for the particular students in their classroom.
What really motivates students to learn? What gets them interested—and keeps them interested—in pursuing knowledge and understanding? Recent neuroscientific findings have uncovered the source of our motivation to learn, or as neuroscientist Jaak Panksepp terms it, the drive to seek. Seeking is what gets us out of bed in the morning, the engine that powers our actions, and the need that manifests as curiosity. Informed by new findings on the nature of the brain’s seeking system, internationally renowned educators Gayle Gregory and Martha Kaufeldt have identified key brain-friendly strategies for improving student motivation, knowledge acquisition, retention, and academic success. In this book, readers will learn * The science behind the motivated brain and how it relates to student learning. * Strategies for preparing a motivational environment and lesson. * Strategies for creating engaging learning experiences that capitalize on the brain’s natural ways of learning. * Strategies for improving depth of knowledge, complex thinking, and synthesis to get students into the ever-desired state of flow. * How attention to the neuroscience of motivation will improve the classroom environment and student learning. The Motivated Brain shows teachers how to harness the power of their students’ intrinsic motivation to make learning fun, engaging, and meaningful.
Just as successful athletes must identify strengths and weaknesses, set goals, and engage in focused practice to meet their goals, so must teachers. Learn how to combine a model of effective instruction with goal setting, focused practice, focused feedback, and observations to improve your instructional practices. Included are 280 strategies related to the 41 elements of effective teaching shown to enhance student achievement.
As teachers today work in ever more challenging contexts, groupwork remains a particularly effective pedagogical strategy. Based on years of research and teaching experience, the new edition of this popular book features significant updates on the successful use of cooperative learning to build equitable classrooms. Designing Groupwork, Third Edition incorporates current research findings with new material on what makes for a groupworthy task, and shows how groupwork contributes to growth and development in the language of instruction. Responding to new curriculum standards and assessments across all grade levels and subject areas, this edition shows teachers how to organize their classroom so that all students participate actively. This valuable and sensible resource is essential reading for educators at both the elementary and secondary levels, for teachers in training, and for anyone working in the field of education.
The Quest for Learning: How to Maximize Student Engagement affirms that traditional classroom learning experiences, in which you plan lessons and voice instruction at the front of the room, do not meet 21st century students learning needs. Questing is a customizable pedagogy that readers and their students together tailor to a students abilities, needs, and interests. Side by side, and aligned with learning targets, readers learn how teachers and students determine what a student will learn about and at what pace. Authors Marie Alcock, Michael Fisher, and Allison Zmuda propose three tenets of engagement (1) the learner engages with relevant, worthy inquiries and experiences that are interesting or emotionally gripping, (2) the learner engages in an active, intentional cycle with clear goals and right-sized, actionable steps, and (3) the learner engages in social, collaborative opportunities that grow expertise that allow students to take ownership of their learning. To further that ownership, students decide which design type they want to use to explore their quest topic (1) question, (2) game, or (3) network. Students then pursue lines of inquiry, design or play games, or communicate with peers and experts in online and physical spaces. Each is a method for becoming an expert on chosen topics.
This book shares instructional practices that educators can use to respond to students' diverse needs as they develop 21st century skills. Choose complex thinking strategies to best help students expand their knowledge and skills, and positively impact students' academic success. Use questioning techniques to build connections between students and their learning by encouraging students to have advanced discussions, collaborate, and take risks in the classroom. Explore example situations, templates, and strategies of quality practices in assessment design to promote students' higher-order thinking skills and deepen their engagement. Benefits Discover how questioning can promote the traits that students need to succeed in college and their careers. Provide supports that help students reach deep levels of understanding with questioning structures to engage higher-order thinking. Explore how to deconstruct standards and standards-based questions to write quality questions that align with academic expectations. Create a classroom climate that fosters collaboration and constructive discussions. Use templates, surveys, and checklists to plan instruction, deconstruct academic standards, assess student engagement, and collect data. Contents Chapter 1: Using Questioning Strategies in the Classroom Chapter 2: Concentrating on Higher-Order Thinking Skills Chapter 3: Developing Effective Assessments Chapter 4: Ensuring Student Success With Complex Questions Chapter 5: Encouraging Traits to Attain College and Career Readiness Chapter 6: Encouraging Student Involvement Chapter 7: Growing Students' Ability to Ask Questions That Matter Chapter 8: Creating Standards-Based Questions and Tasks Epilogue: Pulling It All Together References and Resources
For more than two decades, the concept of student engagement has grown from simple attention in class to a construct comprised of cognitive, emotional, and behavioral components that embody and further develop motivation for learning. Similarly, the goals of student engagement have evolved from dropout prevention to improved outcomes for lifelong learning. This robust expansion has led to numerous lines of research across disciplines and are brought together clearly and comprehensively in the Handbook of Research on Student Engagement. The Handbook guides readers through the field’s rich history, sorts out its component constructs, and identifies knowledge gaps to be filled by future research. Grounding data in real-world learning situations, contributors analyze indicators and facilitators of student engagement, link engagement to motivation, and gauge the impact of family, peers, and teachers on engagement in elementary and secondary grades. Findings on the effectiveness of classroom interventions are discussed in detail. And because assessing engagement is still a relatively new endeavor, chapters on measurement methods and issues round out this important resource. Topical areas addressed in the Handbook include: Engagement across developmental stages. Self-efficacy in the engaged learner. Parental and social influences on engagement and achievement motivation. The engaging nature of teaching for competency development. The relationship between engagement and high-risk behavior in adolescents. Comparing methods for measuring student engagement. An essential guide to the expanding knowledge base, the Handbook of Research on Student Engagement serves as a valuable resource for researchers, scientist-practitioners, and graduate students in such varied fields as clinical child and school psychology, educational psychology, public health, teaching and teacher education, social work, and educational policy.
This title is a greatly expanded volume of the original Art and Science of Teaching, offering a framework for substantive change based on Marzano s 50 years of education research. While the previous model focused on teacher outcomes, the new version places focus on student outcomes, with strategies teachers can use to help students grasp the information and skills transferred through their instruction. Throughout the book, Marzano details the elements of three overarching categories of teaching, which define what must happen to optimize student learning: students must receive feedback, get meaningful content instruction, and have their basic psychological needs met. Benefits Explore instructional strategies that correspond to each of the 43 elements of The New Art and Science of Teaching, which have been carefully designed to maximize student engagement and achievement. Gain ten design questions and a general framework that will help determine which classroom strategies you should use to foster student learning. Analyze the behavioral evidence that proves the strategies of an element are helping learners reach their peak academic success. Study the state of the modern standards movement and what changes must be made in K 12 education to ensure high levels of learning for all. Download free reproducible scales specific to the elements in The New Art and Science of Teaching. Contents Chapter 1: Providing and Communicating Clear Learning Goals Chapter 2: Conducting Assessment Chapter 3: Conducting Direct Instruction Lessons Chapter 4: Practicing and Deepening Lessons Chapter 5: Implementing Knowledge Application Lessons Chapter 6: Using Strategies That Appear in All Types of Lessons Chapter 7: Using Engagement Strategies Chapter 8: Implementing Rules and Procedures Chapter 9: Building Relationships Chapter 10: Communicating High Expectations Chapter 11: Making System Changes "
First released in the Spring of 1999, How People Learn has been expanded to show how the theories and insights from the original book can translate into actions and practice, now making a real connection between classroom activities and learning behavior. This edition includes far-reaching suggestions for research that could increase the impact that classroom teaching has on actual learning. Like the original edition, this book offers exciting new research about the mind and the brain that provides answers to a number of compelling questions. When do infants begin to learn? How do experts learn and how is this different from non-experts? What can teachers and schools do-with curricula, classroom settings, and teaching methods--to help children learn most effectively? New evidence from many branches of science has significantly added to our understanding of what it means to know, from the neural processes that occur during learning to the influence of culture on what people see and absorb. How People Learn examines these findings and their implications for what we teach, how we teach it, and how we assess what our children learn. The book uses exemplary teaching to illustrate how approaches based on what we now know result in in-depth learning. This new knowledge calls into question concepts and practices firmly entrenched in our current education system. Topics include: How learning actually changes the physical structure of the brain. How existing knowledge affects what people notice and how they learn. What the thought processes of experts tell us about how to teach. The amazing learning potential of infants. The relationship of classroom learning and everyday settings of community and workplace. Learning needs and opportunities for teachers. A realistic look at the role of technology in education.
This is the long-awaited update on the bestselling book that offers a practical, accessible reference manual for faculty in any discipline. This new edition contains up-to-date information on technology as well as expanding on the ideas and strategies presented in the first edition. It includes more than sixty-one chapters designed to improve the teaching of beginning, mid-career, or senior faculty members. The topics cover both traditional tasks of teaching as well as broader concerns, such as diversity and inclusion in the classroom and technology in educational settings.

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