Little Britches becomes the "man" in his family after his father's early death, taking on the concomitant responsibilities as well as opportunities. During the summer of his twelfth year he works on a cattle ranch in the shadow of Pike's Peak, earning a dollar a day. Little Britches is tested against seasoned cowboys on the range and in the corral. He drives cattle through a dust storm, eats his weight in flapjacks, and falls in love with a blue outlaw horse. Following Little Britches and developing an episode noted near the end of Man of the Family, The Home Ranch continues the adventures of young Ralph Moody. Soon after returning from the ranch, he and his mother and siblings will go east for a new start, described in Mary Emma & Company and The Fields of Home. All these titles have been reprinted as Bison Books.
The protagonist, Mary Emma Moody, widowed mother of six, has taken her family east in 1912 to begin a new life. Her son, Ralph, then thirteen, recalls how the Moodys survive that first bleak winter in a Massachusetts town. Money and prospects are lacking, but not so faith and resourcefulness. "Mother" in Little Britches and Man of the Family, Mary Emma emerges fully as a character in this book, and Ralph, no longer called "Little Britches," comes into his own. The family?s run-ins with authority and with broken furnaces in winter are evocative of a full and warm family life. Mary Emma & Company continues the Moody saga that started in Colorado with Little Britches and runs through Man of the Family and The Home Ranch. All these titles have been reprinted as Bison Books, as has The Fields of Home, in which Ralph leaves the Massachusetts town for his grandfather's farm in Maine.
The fatherless Moody family moved from Colorado to Medford, Massachusetts, in 1912, when Ralph was entering his teens. "I tried as hard as I could to be a city boy, but I didn't have very good luck," he says at the beginning of The Fields of Home. "Just little things that would have been all right in Colorado were always getting me in trouble." So he is sent to his grandfather's farm in Maine, where he finds a new set of adventures.
Ralph Moody was eight years old in 1906 when his family moved from New Hampshire to a Colorado ranch. Through his eyes we experience the pleasures and perils of ranching there early in the twentieth century. Auctions and roundups, family picnics, irrigation wars, tornadoes and wind storms give authentic color to Little Britches. So do adventures, wonderfully told, that equip Ralph to take his father's place when it becomes necessary. Little Britches was the literary debut of Ralph Moody, who wrote about the adventures of his family in eight glorious books, all available as Bison Books.
Horse of a Different Color ends the "roving days" of young Ralph Moody. His saga began on a Colorado ranch in Little Britches and continued at points east and west in Man of the Family, The Fields of Home, The Home Ranch, Mary Emma & Company, Shaking the Nickel Bush, and The Dry Divide. All have been reprinted as Bison Books.
Ralph Moody, just turned twenty, had only a dime in his pocket when he was put off a freight in western Nebraska. It was the Fourth of July in 1919. Three months later he owned eight teams of horses and rigs to go with them. Everyone who worked with him shared in the prosperity?the widow whose wheat crop was saved and the group of misfits who formed a first-rate harvesting crew. But sometimes fickle Mother Nature and frail human nature made sure that nothing was easy. The tension between opposing forces never lets up in this book. Without preaching, The Dry Divide warmly illustrates the old-time virtues of hard work ingenuity, and respect for others. The Ralph Moody who was a youngster in Little Britches and who grew up without a father and with early responsibilities in Man of the Family, The Fields of Home, The Home Ranch, Mary Emma & Company, and Shaking the Nickel Bush (all Bison Books) has become a man to reckon with in The Dry Divide.
The Ranch on the Beaver continues the hide-and-hoof Horatio Alger story of Wells Brothers: The Young Cattle Kings (also available as a Bison Book). By 1887 the teenage boys, Joel and Dell, have weathered several seasons as ranchers in northwest Kansas. With help from drovers on the nearby Western Trail, they have built up a herd. Looking beyond Beaver Creek, the boys acquire grazing rights in Colorado and Texas. As others fail, they persevere, learning all aspects of a rapidly changing operation—from maturing beef to managing, shipping, and selling it. Drawing on firsthand knowledge, the author of Log of a Cowboy offers a realistic and spirited story mixing hard work and fun.
No American president has been closer to the working life of the West than Theodore Roosevelt. From 1884 to 1886 he built up his ranch on the Little Missouri in Dakota Territory, accepting the inevitable toil and hardships. He met the unique characters of the Bad Lands—mountain men, degenerate buffalo hunters, Indians, and cowboys—and observed their changes as the West became more populated. Ranch Life and the Hunting Trail describes Roosevelt's routine labor and extraordinary adventures, including a stint as a deputy sheriff pursuing three horse thieves through the cold of winter. Whether recounting stories of cowboy fights or describing his hunting of elk, antelope, and bear, the book expresses his lifelong delight in physical hardihood and tests of nerve.
During the depression days of the early 1930s the Jordan family-Len Jordan (later governor of Idaho and a United States senator), his wife Grace, and their three small children-moved to an Idaho sheep ranch in the Snake River gorge just below Hell's Canyon, deepest scratch on the face of North America. "Cut off from the world for months at a time, the Jordans became virtually self-sufficient. Short of cash but long on courage, they raised and preserved their food, made their own soap, and educated their children."-Sterling North, New York World-Telegram "Home Below Hell's Canyon is valuable because it writes a little-known way of life into the national chronicle. We are put in touch with the kind of people who set the country on its feet and in the generations since have kept it there. . . . Primarily it is a book of courage and effort tempered by the warmth of those who trust in goodness and practice it."-Christian Science Monitor "The thrilling story of a modern pioneer family. . . . An intensely human account filled with fun, courage and rich family life."-Seattle Post Intelligencer
Ein an historische Ereignisse angelehnter Roman über die Indianerkriege und die amerikanische Expansion nach Westen, voller Gewalt und Grausamkeit; ein mythisches Weltuntergangsepos mit Bildern wie von Hieronymus Bosch. Hauptfigur ist ein vierzehnjähriger Junge, der 1850 nach Texas kommt und sich einer Bande marodierender Exsoldaten, Desperados und Abenteurer anschließt, die Komantschen, Apachen und friedliche Siedler abschlachten. «Das ist der Autor, an dem sich alle amerikanischen Autoren messen lassen müssen.» (The Guardian) «Der Roman ist großartig in seiner Sprachkraft und seinem Bilderreichtum, er ist grandios in seinen Landschaftsbeschreibungen, verstörend in seiner Darstellung nackter Gewalt.» (Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung) «McCarthy erzählt so spannend wie Joseph Conrad und so elegant wie William Faulkner.» (Der Spiegel) «Ich beneide alle Leser, die ihre erste Erfahrung mit der Prosa dieses Autors noch vor sich haben; es ist eine Erfahrung, als habe man die Welt bislang durch Milchglas betrachtet. McCarthys Sprache klärt den Blick.» (Klaus Modick, Süddeutsche Zeitung) «Das erinnert mich an das Beste von Thomas Pynchon. (...) Das größte Buch seit Faulkners ‹Als ich im Sterben lag›.» (Harold Bloom)
The Virginian ist die Geschichte eines einzelgängerischen Cowboys in Wyoming um 1880, der sich trotz des im Westen vorherrschenden Faustrechts an seinen persönlichen Ehrenkodex hält und so allerlei Unbilden übersteht. Owen Wister war der Sohn von Sarah und Owen Wister Sr. einer Patrizierfamilie aus Philadelphia und genoss so eine privilegierte Kindheit. Seine Großmutter war die britische Bühnenschauspielerin Fanny Kemble. Nach Schulaufenthalten in der Schweiz und in England studierte er an der renommierten St. Paul's School in Concord (New Hampshire) sowie später an der Harvard University. Dort begann er mit Beiträgen für die studentische Satirezeitschrift The Harvard Lampoon seine schriftstellerische Laufbahn und lernte seinen langjährigen Freund und späteren Präsidenten der USA, Theodore Roosevelt, kennen. 1882–1884 verbrachte er zwei Jahre in Paris. Nach seiner Rückkehr ließ er sich zunächst in New York nieder, wo er in einer Bank Anstellung fand. 1885 begann er ein Zweitstudium an der Harvard Law School. Seine Approbation als Rechtsanwalt erhielt er 1888. In dieser Zeit begann sich Wister verstärkt mit dem amerikanischen Westen zu beschäftigen. Dieses Thema entsprach ganz dem Zeitgeist; der Historiker Frederick Jackson Turner verklärte in dem einflussreichen Aufsatz The Significance of the Frontier in American History (1893) die Frontier, also die weiße Siedlungrenze im Westen, zum Geburtsort des amerikanischen Gemüts und des ihm angeblich eigenen Freiheits- und Selbstbehauptungswillens. Roosevelt legte in seinem Werk The Winning of the West (1889-96) die Bedeutung der Westexpansion für das Wohl der amerikanischen Nation dar. Während die "Zivilisierung" des Westens voranschritt, also die Vertreibung der indianischen Ureinwohner, die Besiedlung durch Weiße, und die politische Organisation der Westterritorien in US-Bundesstaaten, machte sich Wister an die Verklärung dieser verschwindenden Welt und prägte mit seinem ersten Roman The Virginian (1902; dt. Der Virginier, 1955)) den in dieser Zeit entstehenden Mythos vom "Wilden Westen" entscheidend mit.
Ein überwältigender Roman über die Zerbrechlichkeit von Menschlichkeit und Würde. Es ist um 1870, als Will Andrews der Aussicht auf eine glänzende Karriere und Harvard den Rücken kehrt. Beflügelt von der Naturauffassung Ralph W. Emersons, sucht er im Westen nach einer »ursprünglichen Beziehung zur Natur«. In Butcher’s Crossing, einem kleinen entlegenen Städtchen in Kansas, wimmelt es von rastlosen Männern, die das Abenteuer suchen und schnell verdientes Geld ebenso schnell wieder vergeuden. Einer von ihnen lockt Andrews mit Geschichten von riesigen Büffelherden, die, versteckt in einem entlegenen Tal tief in den Colorado Rockies, nur eingefangen werden müssten: Andrews schließt sich einer Expedition an, mit dem Ziel, die Tiere aufzuspüren. Die Reise ist aufreibend und strapaziös, aber am Ende erreichen die Männer einen Ort von paradiesischer Schönheit. Doch statt von Ehrfurcht werden sie von Gier ergriffen – und entfesseln eine Tragödie. Ein Roman darüber, wie man im Leben verliert und was man dadurch gewinnen kann.
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Die größte Liebesgeschichte aller Zeiten - jetzt als Graphic Novel Jamie Fraser kehrt nach einer langen Zeit der Verbannung in seine Heimat Schottland zurück. Seine Liebe zu den Highlands ist größer als seine Abscheu vor den Intrigen und Kämpfen der Clans oder als sein Hass auf die Engländer. Doch all das verblasst, als er Claire Randall kennenlernt. Und auch wenn Jamie weiß, dass ihn seine Liebe zu der schönen jungen Frau in große Schwierigkeiten bringen wird, ist er gerne bereit, sich für Claire allem zu stellen, was das Schicksal gegen ihn aufbietet. Wenn sie ihm doch nur ein Zeichen geben würde, dass sie seine Liebe erwidert ...
An illustrated history celebrating the 100th anniversary of this historic, working horse ranch located along the eastern slopes of the Canadian Rockies. The story of the Ya Ha Tinda and its evolution into the only continuously operating federal government horse ranch in Canada is much more than the story of the people who worked and lived there. Its ancient history is an amalgam of geological evolution, with archaeological evidence of ancient indigenous people's use of the land for over 9,400 years and a biophysical inventory of flora and fauna unique to this particular landscape. So important is this small footprint, that it has been the source of a constant struggle for control between governments and special interest groups since the early 1900s, when the Brewster Brothers Transfer Company first obtained a grazing lease in the area for raising and breaking horses for their guiding and outfitting business in Banff and Lake Louise. This unique book covers the 100 years since the inception of the ranch: its challenges to survive intact to the 2017 centennial celebration and the stories of the men and women who worked and survived on the spread as they fought the elements and the politics to keep it as a "home place" for both the warden service and Parks Canada.

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