During the course of the struggle of African people against European racism, brutality and domination, many innovative thinkers have risen from our ranks . The greatest and most courageous scholars have devoted their lives to the pursuit of an explanation for the virtually inherent animosity most white people appear to have toward people of color / Unlike her predecessors, Dr. Frances cress welsing, a brilliant, Washington, DC psychiatrist has rejected conventional notions about the origin and perpetuation of racism .
A collection of 25 essays examining the neuroses of white supremacy.
The Compensatory Code is a term that means the sum total of everything that is thought, said, or done by one individual Non-White person, who is a Victim of Racism [Victim of White Supremacy] that is effective in helping to eliminate Racism (White Supremacy), and/or in helping to "make up" for the lack of justice and correctness.
Rogers' first book From "Superman" to Man, self-published in 1917, attacked notions of African inferiority. From "Superman" to Man is a polemic against the ignorance that fuels racism.
This politically-incorrect book not only reveals the most critical problems facing Black America, if offers real solutions, and a blueprint for total economic and psychological transformation.(NON-FICTION/CURRENT EVENTS/BLACK HISTORY)
A penetrating exposition of the Black middle class individuals who do not accept their role and responsibilties as advocates for all African Americans.
The issue of the memory of slavery has gained unprecedented international visibility that perhaps only the Holocaust has achieved as human tragedy. This recognition has been politically contentious and conceals profound disparities between and within former colonial empires and the colonised societies involved in this crime against humanity. Bringing together a wide range of scholars of slavery from diverse backgrounds, this multi-disciplinary book offers an in-depth analysis of the memory of slavery in different geographic contexts.
The Willie Lynch Letter and The Making of A Slave is an address purportedly delivered by a certain Willie Lynch to an audience on the bank of the James River in Virginia in the year 1712 regarding control of African American slaves within the colony. Some have considered the Willie Lynch Letter and The Making of A Slave to be a hoax that was designed to fuel discrimination & racism in the United States by touching on a very sensitive and negative part of history in America. The letter is said to be a verbatim account of a short speech given by a slave owner, in which he tells other slave masters that he has discovered the secret to controlling African American slaves by setting them against one another.
Describes the African slave trade from the viewpoint of the Southern plantation owners.
Dorothy Height marched at civil rights rallies, sat through tense White House meetings, and witnessed every major victory in the struggle for racial equality. Yet as the sole woman among powerful, charismatic men, someone whose personal ambition was secondary to her passion for her cause, she has received little mainstream recognition--until now. In her memoir, Dr. Height, now ninety-one, reflects on a life of service and leadership. We witness her childhood encounters with racism and the thrill of New York college life during the Harlem Renaissance. We see her protest against lynchings. We sit with her onstage as Martin Luther King Jr. delivers his "I Have a Dream" speech. We meet people she knew intimately throughout the decades: W.E.B. DuBois, Marcus Garvey, Eleanor Roosevelt, Mary McLeod Bethune, Adam Clayton Powell Sr., Langston Hughes, and many others. And we watch as she leads the National Council of Negro Women for forty-one years, her diplomatic counsel sought by U.S. Presidents from Eisenhower to Clinton. After the fierce battles of the 1960s, Dr. Height concentrates on troubled black communities, on issues like rural poverty, teen pregnancy and black family values. In 1994, her efforts are officially recognized. Along with Rosa Parks, she receives the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor.
First published in 1934 and revised in 1962, this book gathers journalist and historian Joel Augustus Rogers’ columns from the syndicated newspaper feature titled Your History. Patterned after the look of Ripley’s popular Believe It or Not the multiple vignettes in each episode recount short items from Rogers’s research. The feature began in the Pittsburgh Courier in November 1934 and ran through the 1960s.
The nearest thing to a full length book ever written by Marcus Garvey. Three years before his death in 1937, Garvey assembled his most trusted organisers for an intensive, secret month-long course of instruction. Garvey's lessons for this unique course are published here for the first time.
"[Exposes] the role Eurocentric history-writing plays in rationalizing European oppression of Afrikan peoples and in the falsification of Afrikan consciousness ... [and contends] that the alleged mental and behavioral maladaptiveness of oppressed Afrikanpeoples is a political-economic necessity for the maintenance of White domination and imperialism."--Back cover.

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