Preisgekrönt und bezaubernd: ein moderner Klassiker Als das Robotermädchen Roz erstmals die Augen öffnet, findet sie sich auf einer wilden, einsamen Insel wieder. Wie sie dorthin gekommen ist und warum, weiß sie nicht. Das Wetter und ein wilder Bär setzen ihr übel zu, und Roz begreift, dass sie sich ihrer Umgebung anpassen muss, wenn sie überleben will. Also beobachtet sie, erlernt die Sprache der Tiere und entdeckt, dass Freundlichkeit und Hilfsbereitschaft sie weiterbringen. Viele würden das Blechmonster zwar am liebsten verjagen, aber Roz gibt nicht auf. Sie zieht ein Gänseküken auf, und endlich fassen die Tiere Vertrauen. Als Roz dann in großer Gefahr schwebt, stehen sie ihr als Freunde bei.
Wenig beachtet von der europaischen Offentlichkeit hat sich im Spannungsfeld von postmoderner Theorie und political correctness in den vergangenen Jahrzehnten in den USA eine sich als afrozentrisch verstehende historische Betrachtungsweise herausgebildet, die Fragen nach der Rolle Afrikas und seiner Bewohner fur die Weltgeschichte ins Zentrum ihrer Untersuchungen stellt. Im vorliegenden Band wird der Afrozentrismus aus ethnologischer, historischer und philosophischer Perspektive betrachtet und in seinen jeweiligen politischen und ideengeschichtlichen Kontexten dargestellt. Dabei wird nicht allein die Diskursgeschichte der afrozentrischen Theorie und Praxis im engeren Sinne erfasst, sondern es werden auch die Geschichte der afroamerikanischen Bilder und Vorstellungen von Afrika und Amerika nachgezeichnet.
Sind Superheldinnen feministisch? Welche Rolle spielten antike Mythen, die biblische Geschichte des Simson oder Nietzsches Philosophie für die Schöpfer von Superman? Und was hat die Nibelungensage mit Marvel zu tun? Antworten auf diese und weitere Fragen - u.a. nach der vielfältigen Medialität und Rezeptionsgeschichte von Superhelden-Stories, der Perspektive der Comicschaffenden auf ihre Kunst und dem sich wandelnden Bild des Superhelden in der aktuellen Forschung - gibt dieser Reader, der erstmals in deutscher Sprache und für ein breites Publikum Texte zu Theorie und Geschichte der Superhelden versammelt und kommentiert. Mit Texten u.a. von Shilpa Davé, Umberto Eco, Stan Lee, Friedrich Nietzsche und Véronique Sina und Interviews u.a. mit Frank Miller, Alan Moore und Roy Lichtenstein.
The New Plantation examines the controversial relationship between predominantly White NCAA Division I Institutions (PWI s) and black athletes, utilizing an internal colonial model. It provides a much-needed in-depth analysis to fully comprehend the magnitude of the forces at work that impact black athletes experiences at PWI s. Hawkins provides a conceptual framework for understanding the structural arrangements of PWI s and how they present challenges to Black athletes academic success; yet, challenges some have overcome and gone on to successful careers, while many have succumbed to these prevailing structural arrangements and have not benefited accordingly. The work is a call for academic reform, collective accountability from the communities that bear the burden of nurturing this athletic talent and the institutions that benefit from it, and collective consciousness to the Black male athletes that make of the largest percentage of athletes who generate the most revenue for the NCAA and its member institutions. Its hope is to promote a balanced exchange in the athletic services rendered and the educational services received.
The definitive guide for anyone who has contact with people of another race--in companies, schools, neighborhoods, or other social situations--this book asserts that race is not the unfathomable mystery it is usually made out to be. In a revealing, accessible, and stimulating discussion based on little-known facts and innovative research, this book explains why many whites are uneasy about blacks and how blacks react to this, why numerous blacks suspect the worst from whites, why white explanations don't hold up, why myths about sex remain so prevalent, and what both races can do together to make their relations better.
Three flags fly in the palace courtyard of Òyótúnjí African Village. One represents black American emancipation from slavery, one black nationalism, and the third the establishment of an ancient Yorùbá Empire in the state of South Carolina. Located sixty-five miles southwest of Charleston, Òyótúnjí is a Yorùbá revivalist community founded in 1970. Mapping Yorùbá Networks is an innovative ethnography of Òyótúnjí and a theoretically sophisticated exploration of how Yorùbá òrìsà voodoo religious practices are reworked as expressions of transnational racial politics. Drawing on several years of multisited fieldwork in the United States and Nigeria, Kamari Maxine Clarke describes Òyótúnjí in vivid detail—the physical space, government, rituals, language, and marriage and kinship practices—and explores how ideas of what constitutes the Yorùbá past are constructed. She highlights the connections between contemporary Yorùbá transatlantic religious networks and the post-1970s institutionalization of roots heritage in American social life. Examining how the development of a deterritorialized network of black cultural nationalists became aligned with a lucrative late-twentieth-century roots heritage market, Clarke explores the dynamics of Òyótúnjí Village’s religious and tourist economy. She discusses how the community generates income through the sale of prophetic divinatory consultations, African market souvenirs—such as cloth, books, candles, and carvings—and fees for community-based tours and dining services. Clarke accompanied Òyótúnjí villagers to Nigeria, and she describes how these heritage travelers often returned home feeling that despite the separation of their ancestors from Africa as a result of transatlantic slavery, they—more than the Nigerian Yorùbá—are the true claimants to the ancestral history of the Great Òyó Empire of the Yorùbá people. Mapping Yorùbá Networks is a unique look at the political economy of homeland identification and the transnational construction and legitimization of ideas such as authenticity, ancestry, blackness, and tradition.
Hybridity and its Discontents explores the history and experience of 'hybridity' - the mixing of peoples and cultures - in North and South America, Latin America, Britain and Ireland, South Africa, Asia and the Pacific. The contributors trace manifestations of hybridity in debates about miscengenation and racial purity, in scientific notions of genetics and 'race', in processes of cultural translation, and in ideas of nation, community and belonging. The contributors begin by examining the persistence of anxieties about racial 'contamination', from nineteenth-century fears of miscegenation to more recent debates about mixed race relationships and parenting. Examining the lived experiences of children of 'mixed parentage', contributors ask why such fears still thrive in a supposedly tolerant culture? The contributors go on to discuss how science, while apparently neutral, is part of cultural discourses, which affect its constructions and classifications of gender and 'race'. The contributors examine how new cultural forms emerge from borrowings, exchanges and intersections across ethnic and cultural boundaries, and conclude by investigating the contemporary experience of multiculturalism in an age of contested national borders and identities.
The image of the West looms large in the American imagination. Yet the history of American Jewry and particularly of American Jewish women—has been heavily weighted toward the East. Jewish Women Pioneering the Frontier Trail rectifies this omission as the first full book to trace the history and contributions of Jewish women in the American West. In many ways, the Jewish experience in the West was distinct. Given the still-forming social landscape, beginning with the 1848 Gold Rush, Jews were able to integrate more fully into local communities than they had in the East. Jewish women in the West took advantage of the unsettled nature of the region to “open new doors” for themselves in the public sphere in ways often not yet possible elsewhere in the country. Women were crucial to the survival of early communities, and made distinct contributions not only in shaping Jewish communal life but outside the Jewish community as well. Western Jewish women's level of involvement at the vanguard of social welfare and progressive reform, commerce, politics, and higher education and the professions is striking given their relatively small numbers. This engaging work—full of stories from the memoirs and records of Jewish pioneer women—illuminates the pivotal role these women played in settling America's Western frontier.
The thoughts, observations and feelings of a black man in modern urban America.
After the “Black is Beautiful” movement of the 1960s, black body politics have been overdetermined by both the familiar fetishism of light skin as well as the counter-fetishism of dark skin. Moving beyond the longstanding focus on the tragic mulatta and making room for the study of the fetishism of both light-skinned and dark-skinned blackness, Margo Natalie Crawford analyzes depictions of colorism in the work of Gertrude Stein, Wallace Thurman, William Faulkner, Black Arts poets, James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, and John Edgar Wideman. In Dilution Anxiety and the Black Phallus, Crawford adds images of skin color dilution as a type of castration to the field of race and psychoanalysis. An undercurrent of light-skinned blackness as a type of castration emerges within an ongoing story about the feminizing of light skin and the masculinizing of dark skin. Crawford confronts the web of beautified and eroticized brands and scars, created by colorism, crisscrossing race, gender, and sexuality. The depiction of the horror of these aestheticized brands and scars begins in the white-authored and black-authored modernist literature examined in the first chapters. A call for the end of the ongoing branding emerges with sheer force in the post–Black movement novels examined in the final chapters.
Why hate Abercrombie? In a world rife with human cruelty and oppression, why waste your scorn on a popular clothing retailer? The rationale, Dwight A. McBride argues, lies in “the banality of evil,” or the quiet way discriminatory hiring practices and racist ad campaigns seep into and reflect malevolent undertones in American culture. McBride maintains that issues of race and sexuality are often subtle and always messy, and his compelling new book does not offer simple answers. Instead, in a collection of essays about such diverse topics as biased marketing strategies, black gay media representations, the role of African American studies in higher education, gay personal ads, and pornography, he offers the evolving insights of one black gay male scholar. As adept at analyzing affirmative action as dissecting Queer Eye for the Straight Guy, McBride employs a range of academic, journalistic, and autobiographical writing styles. Each chapter speaks a version of the truth about black gay male life, African American studies, and the black community. Original and astute, Why I Hate Abercrombie & Fitch is a powerful vision of a rapidly changing social landscape.
In Soul Babies, Mark Anthony Neal explains the complexities and contradictions of black life and culture after the end of the Civil Rights era. He traces the emergence of what he calls a "post-soul aesthetic," a transformation of values that marked a profound change in African American thought and experience. Lively and provocative, Soul Babies offers a valuable new way of thinking about black popular culture and the legacy of the sixties.
It has long been argued that women, especially black women, have been relegated to a second-class status in American society, and despite modern advances remain subject to a debilitating discrimination in many areas of life. This book presents a fresh perspective on the many facets of sexism experienced by African American women, addressing such issues as wage disparity, spousal abuse, and the rising rate of AIDS among black women. It also examines the roots of sexism among African American males, including the effect of gangster rap music on perceptions of black women, and offers strategies for change.
Helena Petrovna Blavatsky (1831-91), writer, traveller and spiritualist, is well known for her role in nineteenth-century theosophy. Born in the Ukraine, Blavatsky travelled extensively and claimed to have spent seven years studying esoteric mysteries in Tibet. From 1863 she began working as a medium and later counted W. B. Yeats among her followers. In 1875 she founded the Theosophical Society with Henry Steel Olcott. Influenced by Eastern philosophy and the Templars, Freemasons and Rosicrucians, the Society aimed to unravel the occult mysteries of nature. First published in 1877, this book outlines theosophy's precepts. The book is a mishmash of Hermetic philosophy, Christian history and Asian theology, and was allegedly dictated astrally from authorities including Plato, Solomon and Roger Bacon. In Volume 1, Blavatsky addresses the 'infallibility of science', attacking the methods of Darwin and others by arguing that scientific truth can only be accessed through occult understanding.
Part of the Systems of Care for Children's Mental Health Series, this volume proposes strategies for developing cultural competence across a range of services. To help professionals improve existing programs, this book offers self-assessment tools, troubleshooting suggestions, planning assistance, methods for recruiting and retaining ethnically diverse staff, and tips on operating in a managed care environment. The authors also tackle specific interagency challenges and special issues as they relate to children of diverse cultural backgrounds. Discussions of current systems and issues for future research make this book critical reading for mental health professionals.
Diese Texte enstanden für die Kolumne "Bustine di Minerva" in der italienischen Wochenzeitschrift "L'Espresso", die von der "Zeit" teilweise abgedruckt wurde.

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