The Later Tudors is an authoritative and comprehensive study of England between the accession of Edward VI and the death of Elizabeth I--a turbulent period of conflict amongst European nations, and between warring Catholics and Protestants. These internal and external struggles created anxiety in England, but by the end of Elizabeth's reign the nation had achieved a remarkable sense of political and religious identity. Penry Williams combines the political, religious and economic historyof the nation with a broader analysis of English society, family relations, and culture, in order to explain the workings and development of the English state. The result is an incisive and wide-ranging analysis that culminates in an assessment of England's part in the shaping of the New World. 'It should hold its own for some time ... the best account for the serious reader' History Today
Peter Wende verzichtet auf einen kompakten komprimierenden Abriss der britischen Geschichte zu Gunsten parallel angeordneter historischer Längsschnitte zu den Themen Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft, Verfassung und Machtstrukturen, Religion und Kirche, Großbritannien und Europa, Empire und Commonwealth, mit deren Hilfe die Geschichte des Auf- und Abstiegs der britischen Weltmacht erschlossen wird. Im Forschungsteil wird der Versuch unternommen, in erster Linie die Ergebnisse eines vielfältigen historischen Revisionismus zu präsentieren, der im Laufe der vergangenen zwanzig Jahre auf nahezu allen Gebieten und für alle Epochen der neueren britischen Geschichte die Leitsätze der klassischen englischen liberalen Geschichtsschreibung in Frage gestellt hat.
Anstelle einer Untersuchung von "Modernisierungstendenzen", wie sie in den letzten Jahrzehnten im Zentrum geschichtswissenschaftlichen Arbeitens gestanden haben, geht es den Autoren dieses Bandes um die Selbstbeschreibung politischer Ordnungen durch die Zeitgenossen. Den Zugang dazu eröffnet der Fokus auf die politische Kommunikation. Wiegt man die verschiedenen Herrschaftskonzeptionen gegeneinander ab, dann tritt Überraschendes zu Tage: Die Frühe Neuzeit kannte einen kräftigen Republikanismus ebenso wie starke Strömungen zur Begrenzung von Herrschaft, die in Mischverfassungssystemen organisiert waren. Die Beiträge erfassen Ost- und Westeuropa gleichermaßen.
No period in British history today retains more resonance and mystery than the sixteenth century. The leading figures of the time have become almost mythical, and the terrors and grandeurs of Tudor Britain have resonance with even the least historically minded readers. Above all Brigden sees the key to the Tudor world as religion - the new world of Protestantism and its battle with the the old world of uniform Catholicism. This great religious rent in the fabric of English society underlies the savage violence and turbulence of the period - from Henry VIII's break with Rome to the overwhelming threat of the Spanish Armada. 'NEW WORLDS, LOST WORLDS' is a startlingly atmospheric tour de force.
Improvement was a new concept in seventeenth-century England; only then did it become usual for people to think that the most effective way to change things for the better was not a revolution or a return to the past, but the persistent application of human ingenuity to the challenge of increasing the country's wealth and general wellbeing. Improvements in agriculture and industry, commerce and social welfare, would bring infinite prosperity and happiness. The word improvement was itself a recent coinage. It was useful as a slogan summarising all these goals, and since it had no equivalent in other languages, it gave the English a distinctive culture of improvement that they took with them to Ireland and Scotland, and to their possessions overseas. It made them different from everyone else. The Invention of Improvement explains how this culture of improvement came about. Paul Slack explores the political and economic circumstances which allowed notions of improvement to take root, and the changes in habits of mind which improvement accelerated. It encouraged innovation, industriousness, and the acquisition of consumer goods which delivered comfort and pleasure. There was a new appreciation of material progress as a process that could be measured, and its impact was publicised by the circulation of information about it. It had made the country richer and many of its citizens more prosperous, if not always happier. Drawing on a rich variety of contemporary literature, The Invention of Improvement situates improvement at the centre of momentous changes in how people thought and behaved, how they conceived of their environment and their collective prospects, and how they cooperated in order to change them.
This major new poetry anthology blends the best selections from the poetic tradition with a wide range of contemporary works, thematic casebooks, and engaging essays that contextualize poetry century by century. Featuring a breathtaking scope of poetry from the English-speaking world, this diverse collection brings unparalleled historical and cultural background to the study of poetry including discussions of the poetic conventions of the time and the poetic “fingerprints” of particular poets. Introductions by respected scholars provide historical context and thematic casebooks provide insight into key literary movements to demonstrate to students how to write effectively about poetry.
"This is Reformation history as it should be written, not least because it resembles its subject matter: learned, argumentative, and, even when mistaken, never dull."--Eamon Duffy, author of The Stripping of the Altars: Traditional Religion in England, 1400-1580
"In Wilson's hands these familiar stories make for gripping reading."—The New York Times Book Review New York Times Book Review Editors' Choice Author of Dante in Love A sweeping panorama of the Elizabethan age, a time of remarkable, strange personages and great political and social change, by one of our most renowned historians A time of exceptional creativity, wealth creation, larger-than-life royalty and political expansion, the Elizabethan age was also more remarkable than any other for the Technicolor personalities of its royals and subjects. Apart from the complex character of the Virgin Queen herself, A. N. Wilson's The Elizabethans follows the stories of Francis Drake, a privateer who not only defeated the Spanish Armada but also circumnavigated the globe with a drunken, mutinous crew and without reliable navigational instruments; political intriguers like William Cecil and Francis Walsingham; and Renaissance literary geniuses from Sir Philip Sidney to Christopher Marlowe and William Shakespeare. Most crucially, this was the age when modern Britain was born and established independence from mainland Europe—both in its resistance to Spanish and French incursions and in its declaration of religious liberty from the pope—and laid the foundations for the explosion of British imperial power and eventual American domination. An acknowledged master of the all-encompassing single-volume history, Wilson tells the exhilarating story of the Elizabethan era with all the panoramic sweep of his bestselling The Victorians, and with the wit and iconoclasm that are his trademarks.
This book is the first systematic historical examination of Samuel Taylor --
"A masterful attempt to describe the historical secondary literature of the British Isles -- from prehistory to the present day -- the set is comprised of substantial essays of 1,000 to 3,000 words each on a wide array of subjects -- all written by pre-eminent scholars in language accessible to beginning students and advanced researchers. Each listed essay title is given a thorough annotation."--"The Top 20 Reference Titles of the Year," American Libraries, May 2004.
"The successful five-month defense of the island of Malta in 1565 against an Ottoman armada by the Knights of St. John was a remarkable achievement, celebrated across Christendom by Catholic and Protestant alike - once they believed the news. In Latin, Italian, French, German, and finally, English, accounts of the siege proliferated - over seventy publications within five years. Thomas Mainwaringe's account of the siege in English is a translation from Latin and among the earliest accounts of the siege to appear in English (1579). In lively, clear, and sometimes moving prose, Mainwaringe's story celebrates the bravery and 'generalship of the Knights of St. John while deploring the disunity within Christendom that so nearly led to the island's defeat and could yet spell disaster elsewhere."--BOOK JACKET.
This book is an historical study of the Catholic mission to England, a joint mission that included three English Jesuits (the first Jesuits to be sent to their native land) and twelve other English Catholics. It focuses on these men and other people who became involved with them. To a large degree, the work is an account of a manhunt - the pursuit of the missioners by Government informers and spies and their efforts to evade capture. In addition, the book sheds light on the life of Elizabethan Catholics, decribes the underground that assisted priests, and points out connections between the English Catholic community and the Continent. It examines the religious struggle in England to that time and argues that the mission intensified the conflict between Protestants and Catholics in significant ways. Also, the decision of the Jesuits to serve in England changed the nature of the missionary effort because for the first time an entire religious order was committed to the English mission and the Jesuits had the training, organization and skills that made them especially effective.
Between 1544 and 1604, Tudor England was involved in a series of wars which strained government and society to their limits. By the time Elizabeth became queen in 1558, England and Wales were likened to 'a bone thrown between two dogs' - the great European powers of France and Spain. Elizabeth's Wars tells the story of how Elizabeth I and her government overcame early obstacles and gradually rebuilt England's military power on both land and sea, absorbing vital lessons about modern warfare from 'secret wars' fought on the Continent and in the waters of the New World. Elizabeth herself was a reluctant participant in foreign wars and feared the political and material costs of overseas combat - misgivings which proved fully justified during England's great war with Spain in the 1580s and '90s. Nevertheless, Elizabeth's armies and navy succeeded in fighting Spain to a standstill in campaigns which spanned the Low Countries, northern France, Spain and the Atlantic, as well as the famous Armada campaign of 1588; whilst in Ireland the last Irish resistance to total English domination of the country was finally crushed towards the end of Elizabeth's reign. Combining original work and a synthesis of existing research, Paul E.J. Hammer offers a lively new examination of these long and costly, but ultimately successful, wars - military exploits which were to prove impossible acts to follow for Elizabeth's immediate successors.

Best Books