Some parts of this publication are open access, available under the terms of a CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International licence. Chapters 2, 4, 10, 47 and 49 are offered as a free PDF download from OUP and selected open access locations. The International Criminal Court is a controversial and important body within international law; one that is significantly growing in importance, particularly as other international criminal tribunals close down. After a decade of Court practice, this book takes stock of the activities of the International Criminal Court, identifying the key issues in need of re-thinking or potential reform. It provides a systematic and in-depth thematic account of the law and practice of the Court, including its changes context, the challenges it faces, and its overall contribution to international criminal law. The book is written by over forty leading practitioners and scholars from both inside and outside the Court. They provide an unparallelled insight into the Court as an institution, its jurisprudence, the impact of its activities, and its future development. The work addresses the ways in which the practice of the International Criminal Court has emerged, and identifies ways in which this practice could be refined or improved in future cases. The book is organised along six key themes: (i) the context of International Criminal Court investigations and prosecutions; (ii) the relationship of the Court to domestic jurisdictions; (iii) prosecutorial policy and practice; (iv) the applicable law; (v) fairness and expeditiousness of proceedings; and (vi) its impact and lessons learned. It shows the ways in which the Court has offered fresh perspectives on the theorization and conception of crimes, charges and individual criminal responsibility. It examines the procedural framework of the Court, including the functioning of different stages of proceedings. The Court's decisions have significant repercussions: on domestic law, criminal theory, and the law of other international courts and tribunals. In this context, the book assesses the extent to which specific approaches and assumptions, both positive and negative, regarding the potential impact of the Court are in need of re-thinking. This book will be essential reading for practitioners, scholars, and students of international criminal law.
The International Criminal Court is at a crossroads. In 1998, the Court was still a fiction. A decade later, it has become operational and faces its first challenges as a judicial institution. This volume examines this transition. It analyses the first jurisprudence and policies of the Court. It provides a systematic survey of the emerging law and practice in four main areas: the relationship of the Court to domestic jurisdictions, prosecutorial policy and practice, the treatment of the Courta (TM)s applicable law and the shaping of its procedure. It revisits major themes, such as jurisdiction, complementarity, cooperation, prosecutorial discretion, modes of liability, pre-trial, trial and appeals procedure and the treatment of victims and witnesses, as well as their criticisms. It also explores some of challenges and potential avenues for future reform.
The International Criminal Court (ICC) is the first permanent international criminal tribunal, which has jurisdiction over the most serious crimes of concern to the international community as a whole: genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and crime of aggression. This book critically analyses the law and practice of the ICC and its contribution to the development of international criminal law and policy. The book focuses on the key procedural and substantive challenges faced by the ICC since its establishment. The critical analysis of the normative framework aims to elaborate ways in which the Court may resolve difficulties, which prevent it from reaching its declared objectives in particularly complex situations. Contributors to the book include leading experts in international criminal justice, and cover a range of topics including, inter alia, terrorism, modes of liability, ne bis in idem, victims reparations, the evidentiary threshold for the confirmation of charges, and sentencing. The book also considers the relationship between the ICC and States, and explores the impact that the new regime of international criminal justice has had on countries where the most serious crimes have been committed. In drawing together these discussions, the book provides a significant contribution in assessing how the ICC’s practice could be refined or improved in future cases. The book will be of great use and interest to international criminal law and public international law.
Principles of Evidence in International Criminal Justice provides an overview of the procedure and practice concerning the admission and evaluation of evidence before the international criminal tribunals. The book is both descriptive and critical and its emphasis is on day-to-day practice, drawing on the experience of the Yugoslavia, Rwanda and Sierra Leone Tribunals. This book is an attempt to define and explain the core principles and rules that have developed at those ad hoc Tribunals; the rationale and origin of those rules; and to assess the suitability of those rules in the particular context of the International Criminal Court which is still at its early stages. The ICC differs in structure from the ad hoc Tribunals and approaches the legal issues it has to resolve differently from its predecessors. The ICC is however confronted with many of the same questions. The book examines the differences between the ad hoc Tribunals and the ICC and seeks to offer insights as to how and in which circumstances the principles established over years of practice at the ICTY, ICTR and SCSL may serve as guidance to the ICC practitioners of today and the future. The contributors represent a cross-section of the practicing international criminal bar, drawn from the ranks of the Bench, the Prosecution and the Defence and bringing with them different legal domestic cultures. Their mixed background underlines the recurring theme in this book which is the manner in which a legal culture has gradually taken shape in the international Tribunals, drawing on the various traditions and experiences of its participants.
This volume deals with the tension between unity and diversification which has gained a central place in the debate under the label of ‘fragmentation’. It explores the meaning, articulation and risks of this phenomenon in a specific area: International Criminal Justice. It brings together established and fresh voices who analyse different sites and contestations of this concept, as well as its context and specific manifestations in the interpretation and application of International Criminal Law. The volume thereby connects discourse on ‘fragmentation’ with broader inquiry on the merits and discontents of legal pluralism in ‘Public International Law’.
Professor Rosenne's books on the law and practice of the Court have not only grown in size and number of volumes, but also in authority. They can be found on the desks of judges, counsel, scholars and university students alike and for all of them they are the indispensable guide to the Court's jurisprudence.
Since the adoption of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court in 1998, international criminal law has rapidly grown in importance. This three-volume treatise on international criminal law presents a foundational, systematic, consistent, and comprehensive analysis of the field. Taking into account the scholarly literature, not only sources written in English but also in French, German, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish, the book draws on the author's extensive academic and practical work in international criminal law. This third volume offers a comprehensive analysis of the procedures and implementation of international law by international criminal tribunals and the International Criminal Court. Through analysis of the framework of international criminal procedure, the author considers each stage in the process of proceedings before the ICC, including the role of legal participants, the scope of jurisdiction, and the enforcement of sentences. The full three-volume treatise addresses the entirety of international criminal law, re-stating and re-examining the fundamental principles upon which it rests, the manner it is enacted, and the key issues that are shaping its future. It is essential reading for practitioners, scholars, and students of international criminal law alike.
"Cherif Bassiouni" is often referred to as "the father of international criminal law." Every major international criminal law instrument developed in the last forty years, from the Torture Convention to the Statute of the International Criminal Court, bears his hallmark. His writings, diplomatic initiatives, fieldwork, and even litigation have made an unparalleled contribution to the emergence of international criminal law as a distinct discipline within the field of international law. This book contains a collection of fifteen scholarly essays, written by leading experts from around the world, about the theory and practice of modern international criminal law, with a focus on "Cherif Bassiouni's" unique legacy within this important area. Among the contributing authors are "Louise Arbour," UN High Commissioner for Human Rights; "Mahnoush Arsanjani," Chief of the UN Office of Legal Affairs Codification Division; "Diane Orentlicher," UN Independent Expert on Combating Impunity; "Michael Reisman," former President of the Inter-American Commission for Human Rights; "Yves Sandoz," Director for International Law of the International Committee of the Red Cross; "William Schabas," Member of the Sierra Leone Truth Commission; "Brigitte Stern," Advocate for the Bosnians in the World Court's Genocide case; and "Prince Hassan bin Talal," first President of the Assembly of States Parties of the International Criminal Court.
Volume 1 deals with international crimes. It contains several significant contributions on the theoretical and doctrinal aspects of ICL which precede the five chapters addressing some of the major categories of international crimes. The first two chapters address: the sources and subjects of ICL and its substantive contents. The other five chapters address: Chapter 3: The Crime Against Peace and Aggression (The Crime Against Peace and Aggression: From its Origins to the ICC; The Crime of Aggression and the International Criminal Court); Chapter 4: War Crimes, Crimes Against Humanity & Genocide (Introduction to International Humanitarian Law; Penal Aspects of International Humanitarian Law; Non-International Armed Conflict and Guerilla Warfare; Mercenarism and Contracted Military Services; Customary International Law and Weapons Control; Genocide; Crimes Against Humanity; Overlaps, Gaps, and Ambiguities in Contemporary International Humanitarian Law, Genocide, and Crimes Against Humanity); Chapter 5: Crimes Against Fundamental Human Rights (Slavery, Slave-Related Practices, and Trafficking in Persons; Apartheid; International Prohibition of Torture; The Practice of Torture in the United States: September 11, 2001 to Present); Chapter 6: Crimes of Terror-Violence (International Terrorism; Kidnapping and Hostage Taking; Terrorism Financing; Piracy; International Maritime Navigation and Installations on the High Seas; International Civil Aviation); Chapter 7: Crimes Against Social Interest (International Control of Drugs; Challenges in the Development of International Criminal Law: The Negotiations of the United Nations Convention Against Transnational Organized Crime and the United Nations Convention Against Corruption; Transnational Organized Crime; Corruption of Foreign Public Officials; International Criminal Protection of Cultural Property; Criminalization of Environmental Protection).
"Collection of papers presented at the conference "Pluralism v Harmonization: National Adjudication of International Crimes" that was held in June 2012 in Amsterdam"--Acknowlegements.
This book provides the most comprehensive overview of the law and jurisprudence of the ad hoc international criminal tribunals and courts, as well as the International Criminal Court. It also includes relevant jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights and practice of the UN Human Rights Committee. The book examines the nature and evolution of the relevant statutory provisions of the international tribunals and provides the rationale behind the evolution. It significantly expands the subject matter of the relevant jurisprudence and reflects the developments and the current state of human rights standards in international criminal procedure. With cited jurisprudence and law that is up-to-date as of September 1, 2013, the book contains a digest and analysis of decisions, orders, and judgments of: the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia * the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda * the Special Court for Sierra Leone * the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia * the International Criminal Court * the European Court of Human Rights.
The book explores recent developments in the international and national prosecution of persons accused of committing war crimes and crimes against humanity. It considers the relationship between national and international law, science and practice, with emphasis on the emerging principle of universial jurisdiction and the effect of "the war on terror" on legal norms.
At the dawn of the International Criminal Court, the rich experience of the "ad hoc" International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) will prove to be the primary source of legal authorities for many years. The creation of the ICTY in 1993 heralded a new-found willingness of the international community to bring to book perpetrators of war crimes and gross or systematic violations of human rights. Written by academics and practitioners, and notably many "insiders" at the ICTY, this volume focuses particularly on the international and criminal law developments that have taken place in the practice and procedure of the Tribunal. Throughout are threads concerning the development and application of international criminal law not only by the ICTY, but also by the "ad hoc" International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda and the new International Criminal Court.
The aim of this book is to assess recent developments in international law seeking to bring an end to impunity by bringing to justice those accused of war crimes and crimes against humanity. The book was originally conceived while the editors were engaged, in different capacities, in proceedings relating to the detention of Senator Pinochet in London. Recent developments including that case, the trial of former President Miloševic, and the creation of the International Criminal Court, have transformed international criminal law and also sparked vigorous public debate. Under what circumstances can those accused of grave crimes under international law now be brought to justice in national or international courts? When can immunity from jurisdiction still be claimed? In addressing these questions and attempting to clarify the applicable law, this book also acknowledges the wider moral and political questions raised, which in turn will influence the further development of the law.
Am 1. Juli 2012 wird der Internationale Strafgerichtshof in Den Haag zehn Jahre alt. Doch die Hoffnungen auf eine universale Strafverfolgung von Menschheitsverbrechen wurden enttäuscht. Die Praxis internationaler und nationaler Gerichte muss deswegen verändert werden. Der Erfolg der Nürnberger Prozesse nährte die Erwartung, in Zukunft alle Regierungen für begangene Verbrechen vor Gericht stellen zu können. Aber der Kalte Krieg verhinderte jahrzehntelang eine Umsetzung dieses Versprechens. Wolfgang Kaleck zeichnet in diesem Buch die schier endlose Serie von ungesühnten Völkerrechtsstraftaten westlicher Machthaber von Algerien über Vietnam bis in die Türkei und Kolumbien nach. Trotz der vielversprechenden Schaffung des Internationalen Strafgerichtshofs und der Tribunale für Ruanda und Jugoslawien gibt es noch viele Gründe für Kritik an den stattfindenden wie an den ausbleibenden Verfahren. Kaleck bemängelt, dass das Völkerstrafrecht überwiegend nur auf besiegte afrikanische Potentaten und Generäle angewandt wird und nicht auf die Verbrechen der Großmächte, insbesondere des Westens. Damit stellt die herrschende selektive Strafverfolgungspraxis das Prinzip universell geltender Menschenrechte generell in Frage.
This book is a guide to the law and practice of victims’ roles before the International Criminal Court, the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia and the Special Tribunal for Lebanon. The various chapters focus on the provisions relevant to victim participation at these courts and the case law interpreting and applying those provisions. The book thus informs the reader on the principal ways in which the relevant practice is developing, the distinct avenues taken in the application of similar provisions as well as the ensuing advantages and challenges. Unlike other volumes focusing on relevant academic literature, this volume is written mainly by practitioners and is addressed to those lawyers, legal advisers and victimologists who work or wish to work in the field of victim participation in international criminal justice. Kinga Tibori-Szabó is legal officer for the Kosovo Specialist Chambers in The Hague and has previously worked for the Legal Representative of Victims at the Special Tribunal for Lebanon. Megan Hirst is a barrister at Doughty Street Chambers in London and has worked on victims' participation issues in the Registries of the International Criminal Court and the Special Tribunal for Lebanon, as well as in an LRV team in Prosecutor v. Dominic Ongwen.
This book deals with the purposes of sentencing in international criminal law focusing on the International Criminal Court. Notwithstanding the modern longevity of international criminal law and the volume of research produced on the issue of international sentencing rationales, the International Criminal Court has not yet established a coherent sentencing policy. Vis-a-vis the absence of statutory provisions identifying the objectives of sentences, this book explores the law as it is with the aim of understanding the philosophical foundations of international sentencing. The work opens with a critical examination of the issue of sentencing rationales in international criminal law and with an overview of the theories advanced by scholars. To pursue its main objective, the book is then divided into two sections. The first section studies whether it is possible to find a norm of international law providing for the aims of sentences in the law and practice of pure international criminal jurisdictions created before the entry into force of the Statute of the International Criminal Court, namely the Nuremberg and Tokyo Tribunals and the two UN ad hoc Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda. The second section analyses the issue of sentencing at the International Criminal Court, by focusing on the provisions of its Statute, on the relevant rules of internationally recognized human rights law and on the Court's first practice. The book ends with a re-organization of the principles emerged throughout the research. The resulting principled system suggests a consistent approach to the penal justifications of sentencing for the International Criminal Court. This is a co-publicatie with G. Giappichelli Editore.
Dr Carsten Stahn traces the historical background, practice and legal challenges of international territorial administration.
Providing an introduction to, and detailed examination of substantive, enforcement and procedural aspects of international criminal law, this book’s examination of international and transnational crimes under treaty and customary law has been fully updated and revised. Exploring the enforcement of international criminal law through an investigation of the practice of the Security Council-based tribunals for Yugoslavia and Rwanda, the International Criminal Court and other hybrid tribunals, such as those for Cambodia, Sierra Leone, Lockerbie and truth commissions, the authors look at terrorism, offences against the person, piracy and jurisdiction, and immunities amongst a variety of other topics. New to this edition are four additional chapters on: various forms of liability and participation in international crime war crimes crimes against humanity genocide and illegal rendition. This is an ideal text for undergraduate and postgraduate students of law or international relations, practitioners and those interested in gaining an insight into international criminal law

Best Books