Some parts of this publication are open access, available under the terms of a CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 International licence. Chapters 2, 4, 10, 47 and 49 are offered as a free PDF download from OUP and selected open access locations. The International Criminal Court is a controversial and important body within international law; one that is significantly growing in importance, particularly as other international criminal tribunals close down. After a decade of Court practice, this book takes stock of the activities of the International Criminal Court, identifying the key issues in need of re-thinking or potential reform. It provides a systematic and in-depth thematic account of the law and practice of the Court, including its changes context, the challenges it faces, and its overall contribution to international criminal law. The book is written by over forty leading practitioners and scholars from both inside and outside the Court. They provide an unparallelled insight into the Court as an institution, its jurisprudence, the impact of its activities, and its future development. The work addresses the ways in which the practice of the International Criminal Court has emerged, and identifies ways in which this practice could be refined or improved in future cases. The book is organised along six key themes: (i) the context of International Criminal Court investigations and prosecutions; (ii) the relationship of the Court to domestic jurisdictions; (iii) prosecutorial policy and practice; (iv) the applicable law; (v) fairness and expeditiousness of proceedings; and (vi) its impact and lessons learned. It shows the ways in which the Court has offered fresh perspectives on the theorization and conception of crimes, charges and individual criminal responsibility. It examines the procedural framework of the Court, including the functioning of different stages of proceedings. The Court's decisions have significant repercussions: on domestic law, criminal theory, and the law of other international courts and tribunals. In this context, the book assesses the extent to which specific approaches and assumptions, both positive and negative, regarding the potential impact of the Court are in need of re-thinking. This book will be essential reading for practitioners, scholars, and students of international criminal law.
The International Criminal Court is at a crossroads. In 1998, the Court was still a fiction. A decade later, it has become operational and faces its first challenges as a judicial institution. This volume examines this transition. It analyses the first jurisprudence and policies of the Court. It provides a systematic survey of the emerging law and practice in four main areas: the relationship of the Court to domestic jurisdictions, prosecutorial policy and practice, the treatment of the Courta (TM)s applicable law and the shaping of its procedure. It revisits major themes, such as jurisdiction, complementarity, cooperation, prosecutorial discretion, modes of liability, pre-trial, trial and appeals procedure and the treatment of victims and witnesses, as well as their criticisms. It also explores some of challenges and potential avenues for future reform.
Principles of Evidence in International Criminal Justice provides an overview of the procedure and practice concerning the admission and evaluation of evidence before the international criminal tribunals. The book is both descriptive and critical and its emphasis is on day-to-day practice, drawing on the experience of the Yugoslavia, Rwanda and Sierra Leone Tribunals. This book is an attempt to define and explain the core principles and rules that have developed at those ad hoc Tribunals; the rationale and origin of those rules; and to assess the suitability of those rules in the particular context of the International Criminal Court which is still at its early stages. The ICC differs in structure from the ad hoc Tribunals and approaches the legal issues it has to resolve differently from its predecessors. The ICC is however confronted with many of the same questions. The book examines the differences between the ad hoc Tribunals and the ICC and seeks to offer insights as to how and in which circumstances the principles established over years of practice at the ICTY, ICTR and SCSL may serve as guidance to the ICC practitioners of today and the future. The contributors represent a cross-section of the practicing international criminal bar, drawn from the ranks of the Bench, the Prosecution and the Defence and bringing with them different legal domestic cultures. Their mixed background underlines the recurring theme in this book which is the manner in which a legal culture has gradually taken shape in the international Tribunals, drawing on the various traditions and experiences of its participants.
This volume deals with the tension between unity and diversification which has gained a central place in the debate under the label of ‘fragmentation’. It explores the meaning, articulation and risks of this phenomenon in a specific area: International Criminal Justice. It brings together established and fresh voices who analyse different sites and contestations of this concept, as well as its context and specific manifestations in the interpretation and application of International Criminal Law. The volume thereby connects discourse on ‘fragmentation’ with broader inquiry on the merits and discontents of legal pluralism in ‘Public International Law’.
This book provides the most comprehensive overview of the law and jurisprudence of the ad hoc international criminal tribunals and courts, as well as the International Criminal Court. It also includes relevant jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights and practice of the UN Human Rights Committee. The book examines the nature and evolution of the relevant statutory provisions of the international tribunals and provides the rationale behind the evolution. It significantly expands the subject matter of the relevant jurisprudence and reflects the developments and the current state of human rights standards in international criminal procedure. With cited jurisprudence and law that is up-to-date as of September 1, 2013, the book contains a digest and analysis of decisions, orders, and judgments of: the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia * the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda * the Special Court for Sierra Leone * the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia * the International Criminal Court * the European Court of Human Rights.
This volume presents an overview of the principal features of the legacy of International Tribunals and an assessment of their impact on the International Criminal Court and on the review of the Rome Statute. It illustrates the foundation of a system of international criminal law and justice by using case studies to provide advice for possible future developments in international criminal procedure and law.
Volume 1 deals with international crimes. It contains several significant contributions on the theoretical and doctrinal aspects of ICL which precede the five chapters addressing some of the major categories of international crimes. The first two chapters address: the sources and subjects of ICL and its substantive contents. The other five chapters address: Chapter 3: The Crime Against Peace and Aggression (The Crime Against Peace and Aggression: From its Origins to the ICC; The Crime of Aggression and the International Criminal Court); Chapter 4: War Crimes, Crimes Against Humanity & Genocide (Introduction to International Humanitarian Law; Penal Aspects of International Humanitarian Law; Non-International Armed Conflict and Guerilla Warfare; Mercenarism and Contracted Military Services; Customary International Law and Weapons Control; Genocide; Crimes Against Humanity; Overlaps, Gaps, and Ambiguities in Contemporary International Humanitarian Law, Genocide, and Crimes Against Humanity); Chapter 5: Crimes Against Fundamental Human Rights (Slavery, Slave-Related Practices, and Trafficking in Persons; Apartheid; International Prohibition of Torture; The Practice of Torture in the United States: September 11, 2001 to Present); Chapter 6: Crimes of Terror-Violence (International Terrorism; Kidnapping and Hostage Taking; Terrorism Financing; Piracy; International Maritime Navigation and Installations on the High Seas; International Civil Aviation); Chapter 7: Crimes Against Social Interest (International Control of Drugs; Challenges in the Development of International Criminal Law: The Negotiations of the United Nations Convention Against Transnational Organized Crime and the United Nations Convention Against Corruption; Transnational Organized Crime; Corruption of Foreign Public Officials; International Criminal Protection of Cultural Property; Criminalization of Environmental Protection).
This book is about the International Criminal Court (ICC), a new and highly distinctive criminal justice institution with the ability to prosecute the highest-level government officials, including heads of state, even in countries that have not accepted its jurisdiction. The book explores the historical development of international criminal law and the formal legal structure created by the Rome Statute, against the background of the Court’s search for objectivity in a political global environment. The book reviews the operations of the Court in practice and the Court’s position in the power politics of the international system. It discusses and clarifies all stages of an international criminal proceeding from the opening of the investigation to sentencing, reparations, and final appeals in the context of its restorative justice mission. Making appropriate comparisons and contrasts between the international criminal justice system and domestic and national systems, the book fills a gap in international criminal justice study.
As the work of the International Criminal Tribunals for the Former Yogoslavia and Rwanda draws to a close, this edited collection appraises their impact. It particularly focuses on the position of judges as lawmakers within these tribunals, shedding light on the profound changes in international criminal law which these judges have instigated.
The popularity of his monumental and definitive works have established Shabtai Rosenne as the undisputed expert on the International Court of Justice s law and practice. His broad exchange of correspondence and extensive conversations with members of the Court and its Registrars, as well as with other friends who know the Court and its practices well, and his experience in the Court and in the UN, especially the General Assembly and the Security Council, led him to undertake this major reconstruction of this work in the previous edition. Now divided into several substantive volumes, the work addresses: The Court as one of the principal organs, and as the principal judicial organ of the United Nations. Diplomats and legal advisers who have to deal with matters relating to the Court on a political level, in different organs of the United Nations and in other offices will appreciate the full discussion of the diplomatic, political, and administrative aspects of the Court s affairs. Jurisdiction and the treatment of jurisdictional matters by the Court. This volume also includes the Court s advisory jurisdiction; the advisory work has related to very difficult legal issues in matters of major political import. The Court s procedure.All of these arenas have undergone significant recent changes. The work s practical features include the English text of the Charter of the United Nations, the Statute of the Court, the Practice Directions, and the 1978 Rules of the Court, together with a full set of indexes. The Fourth Edition (updated until 31 December 2005) of The Law and Practice of the International Court is an essential component of all international law libraries and an indispensable work for those practicing in the field, all of whom will appreciate access to the most recent work on the Court from this expert author.
Since the adoption of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court in 1998, international criminal law has rapidly grown in importance. This three-volume treatise on international criminal law presents a foundational, systematic, consistent, and comprehensive analysis of the field. Taking into account the scholarly literature, not only sources written in English but also in French, German, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish, the book draws on the author's extensive academic and practical work in international criminal law. This third volume offers a comprehensive analysis of the procedures and implementation of international law by international criminal tribunals and the International Criminal Court. Through analysis of the framework of international criminal procedure, the author considers each stage in the process of proceedings before the ICC, including the role of legal participants, the scope of jurisdiction, and the enforcement of sentences. The full three-volume treatise addresses the entirety of international criminal law, re-stating and re-examining the fundamental principles upon which it rests, the manner it is enacted, and the key issues that are shaping its future. It is essential reading for practitioners, scholars, and students of international criminal law alike.
This book deals with the purposes of sentencing in international criminal law focusing on the International Criminal Court. Notwithstanding the modern longevity of international criminal law and the volume of research produced on the issue of international sentencing rationales, the International Criminal Court has not yet established a coherent sentencing policy. Vis-a-vis the absence of statutory provisions identifying the objectives of sentences, this book explores the law as it is with the aim of understanding the philosophical foundations of international sentencing. The work opens with a critical examination of the issue of sentencing rationales in international criminal law and with an overview of the theories advanced by scholars. To pursue its main objective, the book is then divided into two sections. The first section studies whether it is possible to find a norm of international law providing for the aims of sentences in the law and practice of pure international criminal jurisdictions created before the entry into force of the Statute of the International Criminal Court, namely the Nuremberg and Tokyo Tribunals and the two UN ad hoc Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda. The second section analyses the issue of sentencing at the International Criminal Court, by focusing on the provisions of its Statute, on the relevant rules of internationally recognized human rights law and on the Court's first practice. The book ends with a re-organization of the principles emerged throughout the research. The resulting principled system suggests a consistent approach to the penal justifications of sentencing for the International Criminal Court. This is a co-publicatie with G. Giappichelli Editore.
The Rome Statute, unlike the statutes of the International Criminal Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and for Rwanda, creates a permanent court whose dormant jurisdiction covers the territory and includes the nationals of States Parties and is universal in cases where the Security Council makes a referral. Besides, unlike the "ad hoc" tribunals, which have jurisdiction over specific crisis situations whose personal, territorial and temporal parameters have been defined in their respective statutes by the UN Security Council, in the case of the ICC it is not possible to determine a priori in which situations the ICC will be involved. As a result, the most relevant activity of the Court is the determination of those situations regarding which the dormant jurisdiction of the Court will be triggered. The book "The Triggering Procedure of the International Criminal Court" constitutes the first comprehensive analysis of the proceedings that, prior to any criminal investigation, aim to make such a fundamental determination.
This volume is designed to provide a quick yet comprehensive reference to the jurisprudence of both the ICTY and to some extent, the ICTR. It goes significantly beyond the Judgements of the Tribunal into the Orders and Decisions of the Trial and Appeals Chambers. The book is organized by sections, according to each Article of the Statute and Rule of procedure and evidence. Following the text of the Article or Rule, there is a Commentary section, where appropriate and a digest of Judgements, Decisions and Orders of the Appeals Chamber and the Trial Chambers. Materials will be found in the book from the beginning of the operation of the ICTY through the Furundžija Appeals Judgement and the amendments to the Rules in July 2000.
At the dawn of the International Criminal Court, the rich experience of the "ad hoc" International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) will prove to be the primary source of legal authorities for many years. The creation of the ICTY in 1993 heralded a new-found willingness of the international community to bring to book perpetrators of war crimes and gross or systematic violations of human rights. Written by academics and practitioners, and notably many "insiders" at the ICTY, this volume focuses particularly on the international and criminal law developments that have taken place in the practice and procedure of the Tribunal. Throughout are threads concerning the development and application of international criminal law not only by the ICTY, but also by the "ad hoc" International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda and the new International Criminal Court.
The author offers an overview of the most important topics and developments in international criminal law, which are essential to everyone studying and practicing ICL.
The International Criminal Court (ICC) is the first permanent international criminal tribunal, which has jurisdiction over the most serious crimes of concern to the international community as a whole: genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and crime of aggression. This book critically analyses the law and practice of the ICC and its contribution to the development of international criminal law and policy. The book focuses on the key procedural and substantive challenges faced by the ICC since its establishment. The critical analysis of the normative framework aims to elaborate ways in which the Court may resolve difficulties, which prevent it from reaching its declared objectives in particularly complex situations. Contributors to the book include leading experts in international criminal justice, and cover a range of topics including, inter alia, terrorism, modes of liability, ne bis in idem, victims reparations, the evidentiary threshold for the confirmation of charges, and sentencing. The book also considers the relationship between the ICC and States, and explores the impact that the new regime of international criminal justice has had on countries where the most serious crimes have been committed. In drawing together these discussions, the book provides a significant contribution in assessing how the ICC’s practice could be refined or improved in future cases. The book will be of great use and interest to international criminal law and public international law.
There are currently four international criminal courts: the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (the "ICTY"), the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (the "ICTR"), the International Criminal Court (the "ICC") and the Special Court for Sierra Leone (albeit one that is a mixed international-domestic court) (the "SCSL"). Their predecessors, the International Military Tribunals at Nuremberg and Tokyo, for all the criticism that they were "victors' tribunals", were nonetheless international) and are therefore included in this study of international criminal courts and tribunals. The ICTY and ICTR have both held extensive trials and appeals, while the ICC and SCSL are not in operation at the time of publication. Accordingly, the approach adopted here is to examine the law and practice of the ICTY and ICTR in parallel, with a comparison being made to the ICC and SCSL, where appropriate, at the end of each section. Unlike the first two editions of this work, this edition is presented thematically, rather than as an article-by-article, rule-by-rule commentary. Given the emerging corpus of international criminal law generated by the Statutes, Rules of Procedure and Evidence and jurisprudence of the ICTY, ICTR, ICC and the courts in East Timor, Sierra Leone and Kosovo, among others, a subject-matter approach appears more logical and, indeed, user-friendly. Where, however, readers seek exegesis of a specific article, they have only to make reference to the article-by-article, rule-by-rule index to find the appropriate page(s). This is in addition to the subject-matter index.
Am 1. Juli 2012 wird der Internationale Strafgerichtshof in Den Haag zehn Jahre alt. Doch die Hoffnungen auf eine universale Strafverfolgung von Menschheitsverbrechen wurden enttäuscht. Die Praxis internationaler und nationaler Gerichte muss deswegen verändert werden. Der Erfolg der Nürnberger Prozesse nährte die Erwartung, in Zukunft alle Regierungen für begangene Verbrechen vor Gericht stellen zu können. Aber der Kalte Krieg verhinderte jahrzehntelang eine Umsetzung dieses Versprechens. Wolfgang Kaleck zeichnet in diesem Buch die schier endlose Serie von ungesühnten Völkerrechtsstraftaten westlicher Machthaber von Algerien über Vietnam bis in die Türkei und Kolumbien nach. Trotz der vielversprechenden Schaffung des Internationalen Strafgerichtshofs und der Tribunale für Ruanda und Jugoslawien gibt es noch viele Gründe für Kritik an den stattfindenden wie an den ausbleibenden Verfahren. Kaleck bemängelt, dass das Völkerstrafrecht überwiegend nur auf besiegte afrikanische Potentaten und Generäle angewandt wird und nicht auf die Verbrechen der Großmächte, insbesondere des Westens. Damit stellt die herrschende selektive Strafverfolgungspraxis das Prinzip universell geltender Menschenrechte generell in Frage.
New edition of market-leading textbook contains both updated and new material to give the most current coverage of the subject.

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