In his previous books Allen Guttmann has provided incisive perspectives on Avery Brundage's role in the Olympic movement and on the nature of modern sports. Now, in his latest book, the accomplished historian of sport turns his attention from the playing field to the grandstand. Sports Spectators, the first historical study of the subject from antiquity to today, is at once erudite and entertaining; comprehensive and succint. Guttmann first examines the history of sports spectators, starting with Ancient Greece and Rome. He then moves on to the Renaissance and traces three early sports -the tournament, archery, and early versions of football. The author then focuses on the emergenece of sports in post-Renaissance England, and discusses the curious spectacle of animal sports (bear- and bull-baiting and cockfighting), as well as the first appearance of combat sports such as sword fighting, stick fighting, and boxing. The book concludes its historical view by exploring contemporary baseball, football, rowing, tennis, and golf. From his chronological narrative, Guttmann shifts to detailed analysis of the economic, sociological, and psychological aspects of sports spectatorship. Who were, and are, sports spectators? What is their gender and social class? Have they normally been participants as well as fans? What are the political functions of sports-watching? What are the social dynamics of spectatorship? Guttmann provides fresh insights which will be useful to scholars and fascinating to everyone. Sports Spectators also looks at the dramatic transformations radio and television have made, and offers an incisive critique of today's sports-related violence, including the increasingly frequent incidences of spectator hooliganism. How violent (or peaceful) have spectators traditionally been? Has spectator violence increased or decreased? You needn't be a season ticket-holder to enjoy Sports Spectators. Allen Guttmann makes the history of fandom come alive for any reader interested in Western culture and what forms of entertainment reveal about us, as well as those concerned with the recent growth of spectator violence.
More than thirty million Americans live in small, out-of-the-way places. Many of them could have joined the vast majority of Americans who live in cities and suburbs. They could live closer to more lucrative careers and convenient shopping, a wider range of educational opportunities, and more robust health care. But they have opted to live differently. In Small-Town America, we meet factory workers, shop owners, retirees, teachers, clergy, and mayors--residents who show neighborliness in small ways, but who also worry about everything from school closings and their children's futures to the ups and downs of the local economy. Drawing on more than seven hundred in-depth interviews in hundreds of towns across America and three decades of census data, Robert Wuthnow shows the fragility of community in small towns. He covers a host of topics, including the symbols and rituals of small-town life, the roles of formal and informal leaders, the social role of religious congregations, the perception of moral and economic decline, and the myriad ways residents in small towns make sense of their own lives. Wuthnow also tackles difficult issues such as class and race, abortion, homosexuality, and substance abuse. Small-Town America paints a rich panorama of individuals who reside in small communities, finding that, for many people, living in a small town is an important part of self-identity.
Placing the clubs in the context of twentieth-century middle-class culture, Charles maintains that they represented the response of locally oriented, traditional middle-class men to societal changes. The groups emerged at a time when service was becoming both a middle-class and a business ideal. As voluntary associations, they represented a shift in organizing rationale, from fraternalism to service. The clubs and their ideology of service were welcome as a unifying force at a time when small cities and towns were beset by economic and population pressures.
This 2-volume work includes approximately 1,200 entries in A-Z order, critically reviewing the literature on specific topics from abortion to world systems theory. In addition, nine major entries cover each of the major disciplines (political economy; management and business; human geography; politics; sociology; law; psychology; organizational behavior) and the history and development of the social sciences in a broader sense.
Housing is a fundamental need and universal part of human living that shapes our lives in profound ways that go far beyond basic sheltering. Where we live can determine our self-image, social status, health and safety, quality of public services, access to jobs, and transportation options. But the reality for many in America is that housing choices are constrained: costs are unaffordable, discriminatory practices remain, and physical features do not align with needs. As a society, we recognize the significant role housing plays in our overall quality of life and the stability of our communities. We have made a national commitment to decent housing for all yet this promise remains unrealized. Housing in America provides a broad overview of the field of housing, with the objective of fostering an informed and engaged citizenry. The evolution of housing norms and policy is explored in a historical context while underscoring the human and cultural dimensions of housing program choices. Specific topics covered include: why housing matters; housing and culture; housing frameworks and political ideologies; housing and opportunities; housing and the economy; housing discrimination; and housing affordability. Readers will gain an understanding of the basic debates within the field of housing, consider the motivations and performance of various interventions, and critically examine persistent patterns of racial and class inequality. With an exploration of theoretical frameworks, short case studies, reflective exercises, and strong visuals, this introductory text explores improving housing choices in America.
Shows how new, supposedly time-saving inventions have both increased the workload and improved the standard of living.
'The book clearly fills a void in the field of social impact assessment and should be well received by researchers involved in the field. One particularly strong point of the book is the presentation and review of studies that have not been published previously in readily accessible forms (e.g. agency reports, project reports, etc.). There is a wealth of information in such sources, and Finsterbusch has done us a service by making some of this material available here.' -- Organization Studies, Vol 3 No 4 1982 'The book's main contribution is the enormous amount and variety of data included in each of the chapters.' -- Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, Vol 18 No 2 1982 'In this volume, Finsterbusch seek
Today, almost 80% of Canadian residents live in urban areas, as compared to about 50% in 1931. Canadian society is highly urbanized, and this change is reflected in numerous ways, from the economy and the sorts of jobs people have, to the loss of farmland and environmental degradation. From a sociological perspective, there are two different but complementary approaches to understanding urbanization. One is demographic, focusing on the movement of people to cities or the growing size and density of cities and the increasing heterogeneity of urban populations. The second view ismore socio-cultural and emphasizes the pervasiveness of urban-oriented thinking, culture, and organization throughout society. In this view, it not where you live that is important but how you live. Urban Canada: Sociological Perspectives provides a succinct discussion on urban issues with specific focus on Canadian materials and the Canadian context. Several features include Aboriginal urbanization in Canada, extensive focus oon both the rural and urban economy, immigration, crime, andgender. The overall emphasis of the text is to unite experts in the field of urban sociological issues from a Canadian perspective.
Das Plädoyer des Nobelpreisträgers für eine neue globale Wirtschaftspolitik Der freie Fall der Weltwirtschaft begann im Herbst 2008 mit dem Zusammenbruch der Investment-Bank Lehman Brothers. Die Finanz- und Wirtschaftskrise, die wir seither erleben, ist die schlimmste seit den 1930er Jahren. In seinem neuen Buch fragt Wirtschaftsnobelpreisträger Joseph Stiglitz, wie es dazu kommen konnte – und erklärt, wie wir solche Katastrophen in Zukunft verhindern können. Mit der Wirtschaftskrise hat sich die jahrzehntelang herrschende Wirtschaftsdoktrin selbst entzaubert: Falsche Anreize, entfesselte Märkte und eine ungerechte Verteilung des Reichtums haben die Welt an den Rand des Abgrunds geführt. Für Joseph Stiglitz ist klar: Ein »Weiter so« kann es nicht geben. Statt mit hektischen Rettungsmaßnahmen die eigene, nationale Wirtschaft zu retten und danach wieder zur Tagesordnung überzugehen, müssen wir diesen kritischen Moment nutzen, um eine neue globale Wirtschafts- und Finanzpolitik zu schaffen. Joseph Stiglitz beschreibt in seinem neuen Buch, wie solch eine krisenfeste und gerechtere Wirtschaftsordnung aussehen könnte. Neben einer besseren Regulierung der Finanzmärkte und einer aktiveren Rolle des Staates in der Wirtschaft, müssen wir vor allem dafür Sorge tragen, weltweit Arbeitsplätze zu sichern und den Wohlstand gerechter zu verteilen.
Über Eliteuniversitäten und die Notwendigkeit von Eliten wird zurzeit heftig diskutiert. Aber was sind eigentlich Eliten? Was zeichnet sie aus? Sind Eliten und Demokratie überhaupt miteinander vereinbar? Michael Hartmann stellt im ersten Teil dieser Einführung die wichtigsten Elitetheorien der letzten 120 Jahre - von Mosca bis Bourdieu - in ihren wesentlichen Elementen vor und kommentiert sie kritisch. Ebenso wichtig für jeden, der sich mit Elitesoziologie beschäftigt, ist die Analyse der Eliten in den entwickelten Industrieländern, die Gegenstand des zweiten Teils sind: Wer besetzt in Wirtschaft, Politik, Verwaltung, Justiz oder Wissenschaft die Spitzenpositionen und welches sind ihre Funktionen? Michael Hartmann stellt dar, wie sich die maßgeblichen Eliten in den fünf größten Industriestaaten (Deutschland, Frankreich, Großbritannien, Japan und USA) rekrutieren, und untersucht ihre soziale Herkunft und Homogenität. Damit verbindet er auf anschauliche Weise Theorie und Empirie dieses wichtigen Teilgebiets der Soziologie.
Lexi ist reich, cool, ein It-Girl – und heroinsüchtig. Nach einer Überdosis landet sie in der Clarity-Klinik. Ihr Entzug ist hart, die Therapie schier unerträglich, vor allem die Treffen mit den „Mitinsassen“: Aufputschmittel-Junkie Saif, Trans-Mädchen Kendall, Guy mit der Zwangsneurose, Bulimikerin Ruby, Ex-Kinderstar Brady. Doch ausgerechnet diese fünf werden zu echten Freunden. Und Brady vielleicht mehr. Lexi öffnet sich vorsichtig, beginnt ihr zerstörerisches Leben zu hinterfragen. Aber ist ein anderer Weg überhaupt möglich? --- Ein Buch, das unter die Haut geht: scharfsinnig, scharfzüngig und schmerzlich realistisch! ---
Kevin Lynchs Studie „The Image of the City“ (erschienen 1960, deutsch 1965 als „Das Bild der Stadt“, Bauwelt Fundamente Bd. 16, seither mehrfach wiederaufgelegt) gilt als bahnbrechend. Sie thematisiert die Stadt aus der Perspektive ihrer Bewohner. Der Autor hat weit über seine eigene Disziplin hinaus gewirkt und unter anderem Forschungsdebatten in der kognitiven Psychologie und der Wahrnehmungsgeographie maßgeblich geprägt. Die Frage, warum „The Image of the City“ auch 50 Jahre nach seiner Erstveröffentlichung nicht nur für Fachhistoriker wichtig ist, beantwortet Jörg Seifert in seiner eingehenden Re-Lektüre des Buches. Der von heute aktuellen Fragen ausgehende Blick zurück vergegenwärtigt nicht nur ein wichtiges Kapitel internationaler Städtebaugeschichte, er liefert auch Erkenntnisse zur gesellschaftlichen Verortung von Architektur und Urban Design im 21. Jahrhundert. Jörg Seifert stützt sich auf Lynchs umfassenden wissenschaftlichen Nachlass, auf externe Studien und Archivmaterialien aus dem Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT): auf Kartenskizzen, Briefwechsel, Fotodokumentationen und Interviewfragmente, die in Teilen eine Neubewertung von Lynchs Arbeit nahelegen.

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