The amazing story of the discovery of a 5000-year-old body found perfectly preserved in the Alps - written by the leader of the investigation In 1991 the world was electrified by a chance discovery of a perfectly preserved corpse trapped in an Alpine glacier. Preliminary tests showed that this was the body of a Neolithic hunter who died some 5300 years ago. Now Dr Konrad Spindler, the leader of an international team of scientists examining the body, makes the results of his investigations public for the first time and answers a series of fascinating questions about the `Ice Man' and the clues he can give us to the nature of daily life in the late Stone Age. The result is a riveting scientific detective story, giving us the fullest picture yet of Neolithic Man - our ancestor.
In 1991 the world was electrified by a chance discovery of a perfectly preserved corpse trapped in an Alpine glacier. Preliminary tests showed that this was the body of a Neolithic hunter who died some 5300 years ago. Now Dr Konrad Spindler, the leader of an international team of scientists examining the body, makes the results of his investigations public for the first time and answers a series of fascinating questions about the `Ice Man' and the clues he can give us to the nature of daily life in the late Stone Age. The result is a riveting scientific detective story, giving us the fullest picture yet of Neolithic Man - our ancestor.
In 1991, scientists announced the unprecedented discovery of a Stone Age man, buried in an alpine glacier for 5000 years. This title takes the reader inside the scientific investigations which sought to understand questions about the world of 3000 BC.
Presents a collection of primary source documents, a timeline, and a master index.
A commanding meditation on the development of early human imagination.
The study of built environments such as gymnasiums, football stadiums, swimmimg pools and skating rinks provides unique information about the historical enclosure of the gendered and sexualised body, the body's capabilities, needs and desires. It illuminates the tensions between the globalising tendencies of sport and the importance of local culture and a sense of place. This collection uses spatial concepts and examples to examine the nature and development of sporting practices. At a time when the importance of spacial theories and spacial metaphors to sport is being increasingly recognised, this pioneering work on the changing landscape of sporting life will appeal to students of the history, sociology and management of sport.
This exploration of empirical inference in science presents a formal description of the process by which scientific measurements support convincing explanations of the world around us.
Designed for introductory-level survey courses in the History of Western Civilization. The West: Encounters & Transformations takes a new approach to telling the story of Western civilization. Rather than looking at Western civilization only as the history of Europe from ancient times to the present, this groundbreaking book examines the changing nature of the West—how the definition of the West has evolved and has been transformed throughout history. It explores the ways Western civilization has changed as a result of cultural encounters with different beliefs, ideas, technologies, and peoples, both outside the West and within it. Presenting a balanced treatment of political, social, religious, and cultural history, this text emphasizes the ever-shifting boundaries of the geographic and cultural realm of the West.
In this lavishly illustrated book Richard Rudgley gives a lively account of his journey across the continents and back through time in search of the lost legacy of prehistoric man. The popular view of Stone Age Man as a primitive and ignorant forerunner of ourselves is shattered as the author reveals, step by step, the myriad and remarkable accomplishments mdade before the dawn of history. His journey begins in ancient Egypt, where excavations at Abydos have unearthed hieroglyphs belonging to an age before the pharaohs, which Egtypologists have begun calling Dynasty O; to stone circles and burial chambers in Ireland which carbon dating prove to precede Stonehenge by two millennia; to the world's first town, 9, 000 year old Catal Huyuk in Turkey; to startling new research on the body of the Ice Man, the 5, 300 year old mummy found a few years ago in an Alpine glacier which reveals that acupuncture was practised in Stone Age Europe; 11, 000 year old writing unearthed on the banks of the Euphrates, the awe-inspiring cave paintings of Ice Age Europe, and finally to Indonesia where the discovery of the Euphrates; the awe inspiring cave paintings of Ice Age France; and finally to Indonesia where the discovery of stone tools that pre-Neanderhal man undertook voyages on rafts across the sea an incredible 700, 000 years
Every new and groundbreaking archaeological discovery refines our understanding of human history. This title examines the study of Ötzi the iceman. The book explores what scientists know about Ötzi's life, traces his discovery and the subsequent scientific investigation, and discusses future study and conservation efforts. Well-placed sidebars, vivid photos, helpful maps, and a glossary enhance readers' understanding of the topic. Additional features include a table of contents, a selected bibliography, source notes, and an index, plus a timeline and essential facts. Aligned to Common Core Standards and correlated to state standards. Essential Library is an imprint of Abdo Publishing, a division of ABDO.
This excellent introductory textbook describes and explains the origins of modern culture– the dawn of agriculture in the Neolithic area. Written in an easy-to-read style, this lively and engaging book familiarises the reader with essential archaeological and genetic terms and concepts, explores the latest evidence from scientific analyses as varied as deep sea coring, pollen identification, radiometric dating and DNA research, condensing them into an up-to-date academic account, specifically written to be clear even the novice reader. Focusing primarily on sites in southwest Asia, Neolithic addresses questions such as: Which plants and animals were the first to be domesticated, and how? How did life change when people began farming? What were the first villages like? What do we know about the social, political and religious life of these newly founded societies? What happened to human health as a result of the Neolithic Revolution? Lavishly illustrated with almost a hundred images, this enjoyable book is an ideal introduction both for students of archaeology and for general readers interested in our past.
Destined to become a modern classic in the vein of Guns, Germs, and Steel, Sapiens is a lively, groundbreaking history of humankind told from a unique perspective. 100,000 years ago, at least six species of human inhabited the earth. Today there is just one. Us. Homo Sapiens. How did our species succeed in the battle for dominance? Why did our foraging ancestors come together to create cities and kingdoms? How did we come to believe in gods, nations, and human rights; to trust money, books, and laws; and to be enslaved by bureaucracy, timetables, and consumerism? And what will our world be like in the millennia to come? In Sapiens, Dr. Yuval Noah Harari spans the whole of human history, from the very first humans to walk the earth to the radical -- and sometimes devastating -- breakthroughs of the Cognitive, Agricultural, and Scientific Revolutions. Drawing on insights from biology, anthropology, palaeontology, and economics, he explores how the currents of history have shaped our human societies, the animals and plants around us, and even our personalities. Have we become happier as history has unfolded? Can we ever free our behaviour from the heritage of our ancestors? And what, if anything, can we do to influence the course of the centuries to come? Bold, wide-ranging and provocative, Sapiens challenges everything we thought we knew about being human: our thoughts, our actions, our power...and our future.

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