Cynical ex-soldier Cutter Blackwell left Texas on a mission: find his adopted brother's long-lost sister and bring her home. But the moment Cutter met shy schoolteacher Sara Gunter, something unbearably tender wrapped around his battle-scarred heart. She was everything a confirmed bachelor shouldn't want. A gentle-hearted beauty who believed in fairy-tale endings. An innocent rose who had never experienced the pleasure of a man's kiss. Yet something about Sara's smile made the avowed loner want her as his own. But once she learned who he really was, could he regain Sara's trust and make her realize that she was meant to be his?
Life is filled with precious moments to be cherished because it can all be gone in a flash and you'll be left with nothing but treasured memories. Deidra Ferguson and John Sinclair are all too aware of this. They're both in Hawaii to see their loved ones' ashes to their final resting place--off the coast of Oahu. Can these two broken hearts find a way to help each other mend? Find out in THE MARRIAGE PROMISE, BOOK FOUR in the New York Times & USA Today bestselling series BILLIONAIRE GAMES from award-winning author Sandra Edwards.
In search of a wife! Logan Hunter had made a promise: to find a new bride for himself, and a mother for his darling daughter. That was five years ago, and he hadn't even started looking! But Sara Wynter found him anyway…. Only Sara had none of the attributes Logan wanted in a second wife. She was too pretty, too outspoken. Logan tried not to fall for her—he simply wanted a marriage of convenience. But Sara reminded him that he had a heart, and it looked as though he'd soon be the happiest reluctant bridegroom ever! "Ms. Green spins an enchanting tale with marvelous characterization." —Romantic Times on The Wedding Promise
From divorce court to popular culture, alimony is a dirty word. Unpopular and rarely ordered, the awards are frequently inconsistent and unpredictable. The institution itself is often viewed as an historical relic that harkens back to a gendered past in which women lacked the economic independence to free themselves from economic support by their spouses. In short, critics of alimony claim it has no place in contemporary visions of marriage as a partnership of equals. But as Cynthia Lee Starnes argues in The Marriage Buyout, alimony is often the only practical tool for ensuring that divorce does not treat today’s primary caregivers as if they were suckers. Her solution is to radically reconceptualize alimony as a marriage buyout. Starnes’s buyouts draw on a partnership model of marriage that reinforces communal norms of marriage, providing a gender-neutral alternative to alimony that assumes equality in spousal contribution, responsibility, and right. Her quantification formulae support new default rules that make buyouts more certain and predictable than their current alimony counterparts. Looking beyond alimony, Starnes outlines a new vision of marriages with children, describing a co-parenting partnership between committed couples, and the conceptual basis for income sharing between divorced parents of minor children. Ultimately, under a partnership model, the focus of alimony is on gain rather than loss and equality rather than power: a spouse with disparately low earnings isn’t a sucker or a victim dependent on a fixed alimony payment, but rather an equal stakeholder in marriage who is entitled at divorce to share any gains the marriage produced.
10TH ANNIVERSARY THE WAY WEST FOR RACHEL SINCLAIR LED STRAIGHT DOWN THE AISLE And into the arms of a man she barely knew! But Cord McPherson had taken her and her brothers in when trouble struck along the trail. And Rachel believed in her heart that this marriage of convenience would grow into a bond more precious than gold. An instant family wasn't something Cord McPherson had planned on acquiring, but the sight of Rachel protecting her brothers told him she was plenty strong enough to be his bride. And he was good and ready to make their promise to each other last a lifetime.
Honoring the spiritual nature of all beings; this is the essence of the wedding vows from Conversations with God. Thus, these are not simply vows, but something more: an outward manifestation of our deepest inner truth. These vows were spoken by Neale Donald Walsch and Nancy Flemming-Walsch at their own marriage, and are featured in Book 3 of the Conversations with God series. As Neale writes, "We wanted a ceremony that spoke the truth of our hearts, and that allowed us to make promises that we knew we could keep." So, here they are, from Neale and Nancy to you, for use in your own ceremony. Included are wonderful commentaries on love and relationships by Gerald Jampolsky and his wife, Diane Cirincione, and by Marianne Williamson. Also included are meaningful insights on union from the Conversations with God series. May your marriage be blessed.
Welcome to Angel Island…Its captivating spirit can be felt from the shores of its windswept beaches to the heights of the spectacular Angel Wings Cliffs. The island is said to harbor angels who help guide the lost, delivering them from despair and darkness into the golden light of love and faith. The inn is open for business, and owner Liza Martin has booked her first event—a wedding—even though renovations aren’t completed. This brings more of attractive handyman Daniel Merritt into her life, but as Liza starts falling for him, she learns that Daniel is a man with secrets. Liza doesn’t have time to dwell on her love life with all the wedding preparations taking place. She wants to make the event perfect, but the growing tension between the couple worries her. On the day of the wedding a storm rolls in—and the groom disappears. Everything is going wrong, and Liza needs a miracle. But, if you have faith and love, Angel Island is the sort of place where miracles can happen…
The common law action for breach of promise of marriage originated in the mid-seventeenth century, but it was not until the nineteenth century that it rose to prominence and became a regular feature in law courts and gossip columns. By 1940 the action was defunct, it was inconceivable for a respectable woman to bring such a case before the courts. What accounts for this dramatic rise and fall? This book ties the story of the action's prominence and decline between 1800 and 1940 to changes in the prevalent conception of woman, her ideal role in society, sexual relations, and the family. It argues that the idiosyncratic breach-of-promise suit and Victorian notions of ideal femininity were inextricably, and fatally, entwined. It presents the nineteenth-century breach-of-promise action as a codification of the Victorian ideal of true womanhood and explores the longer-term implications of this infusion of mythologized femininity for the law, in particular for the position of plaintiffs. Surveying three consecutive time periods - the early nineteenth century, the high Victorian and the post-Victorian periods - and adopting an interdisciplinary approach that combines the perspectives of legal history, social history, and literary analysis, it argues that the feminizing process, by shaping a cause of action in accordance with an ideal at odds with the very notion of women going to law, imported a fatal structural inconsistency that at first remained obscured, but ultimately vulgarized and undid the cause of action. Alongside more than two hundred and fifty real-life breach-of-promise cases, the book examines literary and cinematic renditions of the breach-of-promise theme, by artists ranging from Charles Dickens to P.G. Wodehouse, to expose the subtle yet unmistakable ways in which what happened (and what changed) in the breach-of-promise courtroom influenced the changing representation of the breach-of-promise plaintiff in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century literature and film.
Even in secular and civil contexts, marriage retains sacramental connotations. Yet what moral significance does it have? This book examines its morally salient features -- promise, commitment, care, and contract -- with surprising results. In Part One, "De-Moralizing Marriage," essays on promise and commitment argue that we cannot promise to love and so wedding vows are (mostly) failed promises, and that marriage may be a poor commitment strategy. The book contends with the most influential philosophical accounts of the moral value of marriage to argue that marriage has no inherent moral significance. Further, the special value accorded marriage sustains amatonormative discrimination - discrimination against non-amorous or non-exclusive caring relationships such as friendships, adult care networks, polyamorous groups, or urban tribes. The discussion raises issues of independent interest for the moral philosopher such as the possibilities and bounds of interpersonal moral obligations and the nature of commitment. The central argument of Part Two, "Democratizing Marriage," is that liberal reasons for recognizing same-sex marriage also require recognition of groups, polyamorists, polygamists, friends, urban tribes, and adult care networks. Political liberalism requires the disestablishment of monogamous amatonormative marriage. Under the constraints of public reason, a liberal state must refrain from basing law solely on moral or religious doctrines; but only such doctrines could furnish reason for restricting marriage to male-female couples or romantic love dyads. Restrictions on marriage should thus be minimized. But public reason can provide a strong rationale for minimal marriage: care, and social supports for care, are a matter of fundamental justice. Part Two also responds to challenges posed by property division on divorce, polygyny, and supporting parenting, and builds on critiques of marriage drawn from feminism, queer theory, and race theory. It argues, using the example of minimal marriage, for the compatibility of liberalism and feminism.
How is your marriage? Is it everything you hoped it would be? Is it the happy, successful, fulfilling relationship that God promises it will be in His Holy Scriptures? If we are honest, no matter how good our marriages are, we have to admit that marriage did not live up to our expectations. The good news truth though, is that our marriages can be everything that God promises and that truth is based on these very promises of God. There are things we need to know, understand and act on in order for God's promises to come true in our lives and that is what this book is about - helping you to know how to take your marriage and make it all that God promises your marriage can be in His Word.
The Sourcebook series of anthologies gathers prose and poetry, hymns and prayers from various times and traditions, all centered on a particular theme, from the seasons of the church year to the foundational moments in the life of a Christian. Each collection offers a treasury of wisdom for use in homilies, prayer services and personal meditation.
The scorching new installment of Marriage to a Billionaire In order for his sister to marry, Italian billionaire Michael Conte has to find himself a bride - and fast! When he learns that photographer Maggie Ryan is going to be in Milan, Michael hatches a plan to introduce her to his family as his "fiancée." Never mind that Maggie is confident, independent, and a complete control freak. Never mind that she's everything he doesn't want in a wife…and everything he wants in his bed! Convinced that Michael is in love with her married gal pal, Maggie agrees to keep up the ruse if he'll keep away from her friend. Besides, she's not attracted to charming, ridiculously good looking billionaires who drive her up the wall. Once they're in Italy, however, everything changes - and the sexual tension between Maggie and Michael goes from simmer to sizzling! But have they found the perfect arrangement…or are they trapped in a make-believe marriage? "Jennifer Probst has proved to be one of the most exciting breakout novelists in the romance genre." - USA Today "Jennifer Probst pens a charming, romantic tale destined to steal your heart" - NYT
This provocative and timely book goes beyond conservative and liberal battlesover the state of the American family and addresses the difficult question ofmarriage itself.
The heartwarming new novel from this No.1 bestselling author Restoring a romantic, crumbling villa brings Shelly back to the small Spanish village she and her husband Gerry fell in love with before they married - fulfilling a wedding-day promise he made to her that they would return. But as plans to transform the villa into a stunning wedding venue take shape, Shelly discovers that her grown-up children might need the new move more than she does . . . Jake has begun to question the things he values most: his career as a pilot, his relationship with his girlfriend Fee. Could Spain offer him the change he's desperately seeking? And when Leila arrives in Spain with a newborn baby in tow, she soon finds herself getting caught up in the fledgling business. But then she hears some startling news she wasn't expecting . . . As Casa Maria takes its first booking, will it turn out to be more than a romantic promise made all those years ago? Perhaps a second chance at new beginnings? Emma Hannigan - Stories You'll Want to Share
COURTSHIP, CLASS AND GENDER IN VICTORIAN ENGLAND.
Dennis Fulton has served in local church ministries for sixty years. He served the Chapel Rock Christian Church in Indianapolis, Indiana, when the megachurch movement was in its infancy in Christian churches and Churches of Christ. After a two-year hiatus for renewal and restoration, Dennis was returned to local ministries. During all of his ministry, however, his interest in world missions found him preaching or teaching in twelve different nations, with an extended stay "down under." While in Australia, he completed the manuscript for this book. Over his lengthy ministry, there have been over five hundred couples who have stood before him to declare "I do." Among those have been his five children and, to this date, four of his grandchildren. It has been at the insistence or encouragement of them that this book has become a reality. They think it is important for others to know what it means when they say: FOR BETTER, FOR WORSE. Surely marriage will bring those things that are better. But just as surely, there will be those things that are worse. How much worse? Is it ever worse enough to throw in the towel? FOR RICHER, FOR POORER. Two family backgrounds are coming together in a marriage. One family grabs that dollar bill and squeezes George Washington to death on the way to the bank. The other may run to Dairy Queen and lick the life out of old George. What should be done in a marriage to merge these money matters? SICKNESS AND HEALTH. Some couples have found the stress of preparation for a wedding, the ceremony, the reception, and even the honeymoon leaving them exhausted and near sickness. There are, however, those big words like cancer, Alzheimer’s, and chronic diabetes that could be future tests of this part of the vow. What if? A good understanding of what is contained in that "I do" can help many couples toward the goal of a "they all lived happily ever after" marriage.

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