This book is a reference for botanists and horticulturalists, including an historic account of names and a comprehensive glossary.
The Names of Plants is a handy two-part reference for the botanist and amateur gardener. The book begins by documenting the historical problems associated with an ever-increasing number of common names of plants and the resolution of these problems through the introduction of International Codes for both botanical and horticultural nomenclature. It also outlines the rules to be followed when plant breeders name a new species or cultivar of plant. The second part of the book comprises an alphabetical glossary of generic and specific plant names, and components of these, from which the reader may interpret the existing names of plants and construct new names. For the third edition, the book has been updated to include explanations of the International Codes for both Botanical Nomenclature (2000) and Nomenclature for Cultivated Plants (1995). The glossary has similarly been expanded to incorporate many more commemorative names.
The dictionary contains about 30,000 vernacular and literary English names of plants (plus a few American), both wild and cultivated, with their botanical name and a brief account of the names' meaning if known. It was conceived as part of the author's wider interest in plant and tree lore, and ethnobotanical studies. Knowledge of plant names can give insight into largely forgotten beliefs. Why for example is, or was, the common red poppy known as "Blind Man"? An old superstition has it that if the poppy were put to the eyes it would cause blindness. Such names were probably the result of some taboo against picking the plant. Similarly, other names were likely to have been applied as a result of a country mother's warning to her children against eating poisonous berries. For the warning carries more weight when the name given to the berry reinforces the warning. Many such plants or fruits may be ascribed to the devil, Devil's Berries for Deadly Nightshade is an example. Names may also be purely descriptive, and can also serve to explain the meaning of the botanical name. Beauty-Berry is an example: it is the name given to the American shrub that belongs to the genus Callicarpa, which is made up of two Greek words that mean beauty and berry. Literary, or "book" names, have also been included in this dictionary, as being a very important part of the whole. Many of them provide links in the transmission of words through the ages. Thor's Beard, for example, is a book name for "houseleek", and has never been used in the dialect. But it highlights the legend that houseleek is a lightning plant, and by reverse logic is a preserver from fire.
Knowledge of plant names can give insight into largely forgotten beliefs. For example, the common red poppy is known as "Blind Man" due to an old superstitious belief that if the poppy were put to the eyes it would cause blindness. Many plant names derived from superstition, folk lore, or primal beliefs. Other names are purely descriptive and can serve to explain the meaning of the botanical name. For example, Beauty-Berry is the name given to the American shrub that belongs to the genus Callicarpa. Callicarpa is Greek for beautiful fruit. Still other names come from literary sources providing rich detail of the transmission of words through the ages. Conceived as part of the author's wider interest in plant and tree lore and ethnobotanical studies, this fully revised edition of Elsevier's Dictionary of Plant Names and Their Origins contains over 30,000 vernacular and literary English names of plants. Wild and cultivated plants alike are identified by the botanical name. Further detail provides a brief account of the meaning of the name and detailed commentary on common usage. * Includes color images * Inclusive of all Latin terms with vernacular derivatives * The most comprehensive guide for plant scientists, linguists, botanists, and historians
The 'CRC World Dictionary of Plant Names', a four volume set, is the most comprehensive work of its kind available today. The reader will find its coverage absorbing and useful. Umberto Quattrocchi, was awarded the prestigious Hanbury Botanical Garden Award for his studies on flowers and gardens.
A pocket-sized cross-referenced dictionary of 30,000 terms for finding common or botanical equivalent names from North America, Europe, and the UK. It includes earlier versions of common names and explanations of Latin to identify groups.
With "knowledge, authority, charm and eloquence," author explains reasons for scientific nomenclature, history of terms, components, other helpful material.
Publisher description: The Dictionary of Plant Names is a guide that not only cross references common names to their Latin counterparts, but also details the origins, meanings, and pronunciation of each name. Each genus name is followed by the suggested pronunciation, the family in which it is placed, and the derivation of the name (Latin, Greek, or other). Then the main garden use of the plants in the genus, e.g. herbaceous perennials, trees, etc., is listed. Many interesting facts come to light in the origin of the Latinate name, for example that Kalmia is named after Pehr Kalm, a Finnish student of Linnaeus. Each genus concludes with the common name and place of origin of the whole species, if applicable. Species are listed alphabetically under the genus with the same categories of information.
Excerpt from The Gaelic Names of Plants (Scottish, Irish, and Manx): Collected and Arranged in Scientific Order, With Notes on Their Etymology, Uses, Plant Superstitions, Etc., Among the Celts, With Copious Gaelic, English, and Scientific Indices It was absolutely essential that the existing Gaelic names should be assigned correctly. The difficulty of the ordinary botanical student was here reversed: he has the plant but cannot tell the name - here the name existed, but the plant required to be found to which the name applied. Again, names had been altered from their original form by transcription and pronunciation it became a matter of difficulty to determine the root word. However, the recent progress of philology, the knowledge of the laws that govern the modifications of words in the brotherhood of European languages, when applied to these names, rendered the explanation given not altogether improbable. Celts named plants often from (i), their uses; their appearance; their habitats; their superstitious associations, &c. The knowledge of this habit of naming was the key that opened many a difficulty. For the sake of comparison a number of Welsh names is given, selected from the oldest list of names obtainable - those appended to Gerard's 'herbalist, ' r 597. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
Offers gardeners and horticulturists a listing of the botanical names of nearly six thousand plants.
Prithipalsingh, Indian taxonomist; contributed articles.
Excerpt from The Flora of South Africa: Dictionary of the Common Names of Plants, With List of Foreign Plants Cultivated in the Open We are especially indebted to Mr. I. B. Pole evans, Govern ment Botanist, and Mr. O. O. Robertson, forest-research Officer at Pretoria, for kindly rendering the records Of their Offices accessible to us, and to Professor hubertus elffers (wynberg) and Dr. W. Purcell (diep River) for various suggestions with regard to the orthography of names and the typographical arrangements. Numerous other friends have contributed names or plants for identification, or communicated items of interest concern ing them, or helped us in compiling the list Of foreign plants. In recording their names hereafter we take this opportunity of thanking them all for their assistance and apologize at the same time to others whose names may have been inadvertently omitted. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
Zeus, Medusa, Hercules, Aphrodite. Did you know that these and other dynamic deities, heroes, and monsters of Greek and Roman mythology live on in the names of trees and flowers? Some grow in your local woodlands or right in your own backyard garden. In this delightful book, botanist Peter Bernhardt reveals the rich history and mythology that underlie the origins of many scientific plant names. Unlike other books about botanical taxonomy that take the form of heavy and intimidating lexicons, Bernhardt's account comes together in a series of interlocking stories. Each chapter opens with a short version of a classical myth, then links the tale to plant names, showing how each plant "resembles" its mythological counterpart with regard to its history, anatomy, life cycle, and conservation. You will learn, for example, that as our garden acanthus wears nasty spines along its leaf margins, it is named for the nymph who scratched the face of Apollo. The shape-shifting god, Proteus, gives his name to a whole family of shrubs and trees that produce colorful flowering branches in an astonishing number of sizes and shapes. Amateur and professional gardeners, high school teachers and professors of biology, botanists and conservationists alike will appreciate this book's entertaining and informative entry to the otherwise daunting field of botanical names. Engaging, witty, and memorable, Gods and Goddesses in the Garden transcends the genre of natural history and makes taxonomy a topic equally at home in the classroom and at cocktail parties.
Contains nearly 400 names additional to those appearing in Brummitt's 'Authors of Plant Names'. Extra biographical data is included for 231 authors, and full names are given for 189 authors listed by Brummit and Powell with initials only. An invaluable reference book for all workers on pteridophytes, and indeed for all botanists.
Lists more than sixteen thousand scientific and vernacular plant names, and describes name origins and the characteristics of plants
This book is an up-to-date checklist of the current valid taxonomyfor all vascular plants, bryophytes, and lichens in British Columbia,including synonyms, species codes, and other information. A convenient,geographically restricted, comprehensive checklist like this one willaid greatly in avoiding the present confusion concerning the names ofmany species in the ecological and systematic literature, as well as inapplied fields. The book is organized into three sections. Part 1 organizes speciesalphabetically according to taxonomic order by families of vascularplants, bryophytes, and lichens. Within each family, the genera arelisted alphabetically, along with any synonomies (former names) andcommon names. In Part 2 species are organized alphabetically accordingto their scientific names. Part 3 lists common names followed by theirscientific names. Excluded names (names inappropriately applied toplants in B.C.) are given in an appendix. Those familiar with planttaxonomy will find Part 1 particularly helpful when checkingnomenclature; semi-professionals familiar with scientific names willuse Part 2 and then Part 1; those who know only common names will checkPart 3 and then Part 2 and Part 1 to determine families. There is presently considerable confusion about many species namesin B.C. Plant names change for many reasons and new plants invade.Information about plants in B.C. is scattered in several checklists,most of them incomplete or out of date; for some species, such asliverworts, no provincial checklist even exists. This checklisttherefore will be useful to all professionals working with vegetationand for students in agriculture, botany, ecology, forestry and othersciences. Although the focus is on B.C., the book will also be usefuloutside the province, particularly in the northwest American states andin Alberta and the Yukon.

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