This book is a reference for botanists and horticulturalists, including an historic account of names and a comprehensive glossary.
The 'CRC World Dictionary of Plant Names', a four volume set, is the most comprehensive work of its kind available today. The reader will find its coverage absorbing and useful. Umberto Quattrocchi, was awarded the prestigious Hanbury Botanical Garden Award for his studies on flowers and gardens.
Knowledge of plant names can give insight into largely forgotten beliefs. For example, the common red poppy is known as "Blind Man" due to an old superstitious belief that if the poppy were put to the eyes it would cause blindness. Many plant names derived from superstition, folk lore, or primal beliefs. Other names are purely descriptive and can serve to explain the meaning of the botanical name. For example, Beauty-Berry is the name given to the American shrub that belongs to the genus Callicarpa. Callicarpa is Greek for beautiful fruit. Still other names come from literary sources providing rich detail of the transmission of words through the ages. Conceived as part of the author's wider interest in plant and tree lore and ethnobotanical studies, this fully revised edition of Elsevier's Dictionary of Plant Names and Their Origins contains over 30,000 vernacular and literary English names of plants. Wild and cultivated plants alike are identified by the botanical name. Further detail provides a brief account of the meaning of the name and detailed commentary on common usage. * Includes color images * Inclusive of all Latin terms with vernacular derivatives * The most comprehensive guide for plant scientists, linguists, botanists, and historians
With "knowledge, authority, charm and eloquence," author explains reasons for scientific nomenclature, history of terms, components, other helpful material.
Publisher description: The Dictionary of Plant Names is a guide that not only cross references common names to their Latin counterparts, but also details the origins, meanings, and pronunciation of each name. Each genus name is followed by the suggested pronunciation, the family in which it is placed, and the derivation of the name (Latin, Greek, or other). Then the main garden use of the plants in the genus, e.g. herbaceous perennials, trees, etc., is listed. Many interesting facts come to light in the origin of the Latinate name, for example that Kalmia is named after Pehr Kalm, a Finnish student of Linnaeus. Each genus concludes with the common name and place of origin of the whole species, if applicable. Species are listed alphabetically under the genus with the same categories of information.
"This collection includes information on how to harness the medical potential of plants while avoiding the dangers of toxicity. How to distill essences for aromatherapy. How to prepare herbal teas and fomentations. You will learn about special plants that benefit the eyes, nerves, mouth, throat, heart, arteries, veins, blood, lungs, stomach, liver, intestines, and skin. Plants that aid digestion. Plants that fight infection. Plants that fight obesity by increasing metabolism or decreasing hunger."--Page 4 of cover.
Romanticism was a cultural and intellectual movement characterized by discovery, revolution, and the poetic as well as by the philosophical relationship between people and nature. Botany sits at the intersection where romantic scientific and literary discourses meet. Clandestine Marriage explores the meaning and methods of how plants were represented and reproduced in scientific, literary, artistic, and material cultures of the period. Theresa M. Kelley synthesizes romantic debates about taxonomy and morphology, the contemporary interest in books and magazines devoted to plant study and images, and writings by such authors as Mary Wollstonecraft and Anna Letitia Barbauld. Period botanical paintings of flowers are reproduced in vibrant color, bringing her argument and the romantics' passion for plants to life. In addition to exploring botanic thought and practice in the context of British romanticism, Kelley also looks to the German philosophical traditions of Kant, Hegel, and Goethe and to Charles Darwin’s reflections on orchids and plant pollination. Her interdisciplinary approach allows a deeper understanding of a time when exploration of the natural world was a culture-wide enchantment. -- Alan John Bewell, University of Toronto
The dictionary contains about 30,000 vernacular and literary English names of plants (plus a few American), both wild and cultivated, with their botanical name and a brief account of the names' meaning if known. It was conceived as part of the author's wider interest in plant and tree lore, and ethnobotanical studies. Knowledge of plant names can give insight into largely forgotten beliefs. Why for example is, or was, the common red poppy known as "Blind Man"? An old superstition has it that if the poppy were put to the eyes it would cause blindness. Such names were probably the result of some taboo against picking the plant. Similarly, other names were likely to have been applied as a result of a country mother's warning to her children against eating poisonous berries. For the warning carries more weight when the name given to the berry reinforces the warning. Many such plants or fruits may be ascribed to the devil, Devil's Berries for Deadly Nightshade is an example. Names may also be purely descriptive, and can also serve to explain the meaning of the botanical name. Beauty-Berry is an example: it is the name given to the American shrub that belongs to the genus Callicarpa, which is made up of two Greek words that mean beauty and berry. Literary, or "book" names, have also been included in this dictionary, as being a very important part of the whole. Many of them provide links in the transmission of words through the ages. Thor's Beard, for example, is a book name for "houseleek", and has never been used in the dialect. But it highlights the legend that houseleek is a lightning plant, and by reverse logic is a preserver from fire.
A pocket-sized cross-referenced dictionary of 30,000 terms for finding common or botanical equivalent names from North America, Europe, and the UK. It includes earlier versions of common names and explanations of Latin to identify groups.
Lists more than sixteen thousand scientific and vernacular plant names, and describes name origins and the characteristics of plants
Botanical names can be baffling to even the most experienced gardener. But a plant's botanical name is more than just a handy label—it can tell a plant's country of origin, the shape of its leaves, the color of its petals, and much more. The A to Z of Plant Names clears the confusion and allows every gardener to name plants with confidence. This comprehensive yet handy guide features the botanic names of the plants that gardeners really grow. Additional information includes suggested pronunciation, the common name, the derivation of the scientific name, the number of species currently accepted, the type of plant and the distribution. The A to Z of Plant Names helps demystify names, provides readers with the intriguing background information to naming conventions, and empowers gardeners everywhere to feel confident about naming plants.
The purpose of this textbook is to present classical plant development in modern, molecular-genetic terms. The study of plant development is rapidly changing as genome sequencing projects uncover a multitude of new genes. This book provides a framework for integrating gene discovery and genome analysis into the context of plant development. Taking a systems approach, concepts in plant development are compared to those in animal development, and complex processes, such as flowering and photomorphogenesis, are presented as pathways of gene action regulated by positional and environmental cues. The author places emphasis on organ formation, such as the development of roots, shoots and leaves; and life cycle events such as embryogenesis, seedling development, and the transition to flowering. The book takes examples primarily from model plants with well-studied genetic systems, particularly Arabidopsis and maize. Molecular Genetics of Plant Development is designed to be used as a textbook for upper division or graduate courses in plant development.

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