Combining his scientific work as an ecologist with a life-long study of the Bible, Daniel Hillel offers fresh perspectives on biblical views of the environment and the origin of ethical monotheism.
This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work.This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work.As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.
This is a pre-1923 historical reproduction that was curated for quality. Quality assurance was conducted on each of these books in an attempt to remove books with imperfections introduced by the digitization process. Though we have made best efforts - the books may have occasional errors that do not impede the reading experience. We believe this work is culturally important and have elected to bring the book back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide.
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This book makes the case for realistic faith in the power of intelligence as opposed to blind faith in the pronouncements of those who claim infallibility or divine guidance. The author, Thom Pain, identifies the discoveries of systems and information theory early in the twentieth century as the key to a naturalistic explanation of purposeful life and intelligence and to the last stage in the emancipation of science from theology. He begins his story with the discoveries that revealed the memory mechanism as a built-in "tropisms for truth" that gave even primitive creatures a logical tool for improving their decisions and solving their problems. It is a story that reveals a surprisingly early version of intelligence and an amazing versatility in the types and range of intelligence. When one species developed symbolic languages, it becomes the story of the cultural developments of the human species. As civilization evolved, Thom identifies the rulers and the ruling classes as both the leaders and the obstacles to intellectual progress. In their new role, the rulers either claimed to be gods or the representative of the gods and often led the exploitation that had become the privilege of conquers and of the ruling classes. Indoctrinated faith and loyalty became authoritarian tools of aggression and oppression. In this cruel environment, religion also became a source of moral strength and initiative for the oppressed and religious rebels were often the leaders in the struggles for political and intellectual freedom. These struggles were not about the belief in God but about the abuses of authority by those who claimed to be the representatives of God. Thom follows this story as it sharpened the distinction between reason and theology and led to the modern concepts of democracy and personal and religious freedom.
An examination of the role played by the Bible in the emergence of natural science.
The Natural History of Creation is the third and final installment in M.A. Corey's natural theology series. This remarkable trilogy has worked in tandem with the findings of modern science to help spearhead the rebirth of the once-dead natural theology movement. In this detailed, yet easy to read work, the author focuses on the religious account of creation found in Genesis One and comes to the astonishing conclusion that there is indeed much scientific truth to be found in this ancient work. Many other writers have also noticed the breathtaking parallels that exist between modern evolutionism and the creation account given in the Bible, but nowhere will the reader find a more thorough description of them than in The Natural History of Creation. - Back cover.
Did the whale swallow Jonah, or could the culprit have been a great white shark? What kind of animals were Leviathan and Behemoth? What sort of lions confronted Daniel in the Den and from where did they originate? What were gledes, cankerworms, pygargs, ossifrages and palmerworms? Did the great plagues of Egypt really happen? Why are animals classified as ‘clean’ or ‘unclean’? Why are mythical beasts, such as unicorns, satyrs and cockatrices, mentioned in the Bible? How much of the Supernatural has crept into English translations? This unique book answers all of these questions, and poses others about the birds, bees and beasts that inhabit the extraordinarily varied landscape of the Levant. An original take on natural history as well as an introduction to Bible stories, 'Beasts of the Field' is a crossover title that sheds light on two subjects that are of immense importance and interest.
The author of Roadside Religion traces the evolution of the Bible from a collection of hand-written scrolls to the focus of a multi-billion-dollar business, covering subjects ranging from Christianity's pre-Bible period to the myriad versions that have existed.
This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.
“Lavers keeps his intellectual detective story passionate and suspenseful.” — Washington Post Book World From Biblical stories about virgins to adventures with Harry Potter, unicorns have enchanted people for millennia. In the endlessly fascinating The Natural History of Unicorns, author Chris Lavers ingeniously traces the legend of this mysterious creature to the real people, places, and animals that have influenced its story.
The 18th century was a wealth of knowledge, exploration and rapidly growing technology and expanding record-keeping made possible by advances in the printing press. In its determination to preserve the century of revolution, Gale initiated a revolution of its own: digitization of epic proportions to preserve these invaluable works in the largest archive of its kind. Now for the first time these high-quality digital copies of original 18th century manuscripts are available in print, making them highly accessible to libraries, undergraduate students, and independent scholars. The Age of Enlightenment profoundly enriched religious and philosophical understanding and continues to influence present-day thinking. Works collected here include masterpieces by David Hume, Immanuel Kant, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, as well as religious sermons and moral debates on the issues of the day, such as the slave trade. The Age of Reason saw conflict between Protestantism and Catholicism transformed into one between faith and logic -- a debate that continues in the twenty-first century. ++++ The below data was compiled from various identification fields in the bibliographic record of this title. This data is provided as an additional tool in helping to insure edition identification: ++++ British Library T116098 Anonymous. By John Hutchinson. London: printed by J. Bettenham: and sold by C. Rivington, and J. Clarke, 1725. [2],283, [1]p.; 8°
A compelling account of the extraordinary relatives of ordinary garden conifers. Leading expert Aljos Farjon provides a compelling narrative that observes conifers from the standpoint of the curious naturalist. It starts with the basic question of what conifers are and continues to explore their evolution, taxonomy, ecology, distribution, human uses, and issues of conservation. As the story unfolds many popular misconceptions are dispelled, such as the false notion that all conifers have cones. The extraordinary diversity of conifers begins to dawn as Farjon describes the diminutive creeping shrub Microcachrys tetragona, whose strange seed cones resemble raspberries, and the prehistoric-looking Araucaria meulleri. The taxonomic diversity of conifers is huge and Farjon goes on to relate how, over the course of 300 million years, these trees and shrubs have adapted to survive geological upheavals, climatic extremes, and formidable competition from flowering plants. All who seek to learn more about the early history of life on our planet will cherish this book.
An exploration of human behavior examines the innate aspects of love, sex, and marriage, discussing flirting behavior, courting postures, the brain chemistry of attraction, divorce and adultery in societies around the world, and more. Reprint.

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