Volume 3 of The New Farmer's Almanac--360 pages of original agrarian content, essays, cartoons, imagery and historical snippets--harnesses the wisdom of over 120 contributors from our community of new farmers and ranchers. This volume explores the theme of The Commons, drawing from folklore, mathematical projections, empirical, emotional, and geographical observations of theory and praxis. Farmers hold space in many interwoven commons, and possibilities for our shared future would seem to rest on how these intersecting commons are governed--particularly at the juncture of humanity and ecology where we make our workplace. In re-visiting the Almanac format, we assert our version of Americana and equip ourselves for the challenges of rebuilding the food system and restoring a more democratic, more diverse, and more resilient foundation for society. We face a dystopian future, with guaranteed-unpredictable weather, the impending collapse of the fossil fuel economy, endlessly consolidating monopolies, and a country that is, for the first time in our history, majority urban. That's why this Almanac is a utopian publication, one that reminds today's farmers about the foundational concepts of an agrarian democracy--themselves utopian. But we also reject the self-propelling logic of techno-utopia--dependent upon extraction economies and enclosure of common resources. We orient ourselves instead toward the words of Ursula Le Guin, who reminds us that our intent in utopian thinking should not be "reactionary, nor even conservative, but simply subversive. It seems that the utopian imagination is trapped, like capitalism and industrialism and the human population, in a one-way future consisting only of growth." This tidy volume holds a civil, lived testimony from people whose work, lifeworld, and behavior patterns beamingly subvert the normative values of the macro economy called America.
A compilation of practical advice and folklore features weather forecasts for the United States, planting tables, health remedies, horoscopes, recipes, games and puzzles, and other entertaining and useful information
In the fourth volume of this loved publication, the Greenhorns' diverse collaborators have created yet another delightful miscellany of writings and artwork--centered, this time round, on diversification, in all its forms. The New Farmer's Almanac, Vol IV features essays and poems from dozens of farmers, ranchers, ecologists, educators, food bank managers, grocers, gardeners, and other actors and advocates bound by their care for the land, the food system, and the preservation of the natural world. There are folk stories, reports on the racial distribution of farmland, recipes for hickory nut milk and healing and foraged tea. Toolboxes for seed-saving, indigenous land repatriation, and creating liberated space. Advice from old-timers and insights from the new. Meditations on failure, loved crops, and the wisdom of farm dogs. Here are stories about leaving, and of returning home to work the land; essays on the geography of self-discovery; reflections on trauma, both climatic and personal; and some practical guidance for farmers. Add to this hundreds of unique images, from lost-and-found postcards to inked watersheds to sketches of refugee gardens. Created by the Greenhorns, The New Farmer's Almanac is a place for public thinking and proactive literary inquiry into the future we share on the land and at the table. Shifting practices is a team sport, and with its original artwork, historic photographs, moon charts, essays, reading lists, proposals, and old-time manifestos, this is just the compendium to inspire your own part in the mix.
Excerpt from The New-Hampshire Register, Farmers' Almanac and Business Directory for 1880: During Bissextile or Leap Year, and Closing the One Hundred and Fourth and Beginning the One Hundred and Fifth Year of the Independence of the United States; Astronomical Calculations Fitted Expressly for the New Hampshire Register The Chicago Tribune said of the bound volume of st. Nicho Las, for 1879: There is nothing in the whole world to compare With it in point ot' literary merit, attractiveness, or richness and abundance of illustration. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
There once was a duck who had the bad luck to live with a lazy farmer. While the duck worked, the farmer lay in bed - until one day the other animals decided to take action!
It’s another new year celebrating everything under the Sun, including the Moon, with The Old Farmer’s Almanac, America’s oldest continuously published periodical! Always timely, topical, and distinctively “useful, with a pleasant degree of humor,” the Almanac has been beloved for centuries by people from all walks of life. As the nation’s iconic calendar, the 2018 edition will mark the days, months, and seasons; preview astronomical events; and cover a range of related topics: trends, gardening, anniversaries, recipes, home remedies, pets, husbandry, folklore, amusement, contests, fishing, and more—too much more to mention—all in the inimitable way it has done since 1792.
Offers anecdotes, tips, aphorisms, records, predictions, and trivia about all types of weather from hurricanes and tornados to floods and droughts
Presents over two hundred recipes for such comfort foods as onion and bacon tarts, potato and artichoke au gratin, sausage meat loaf, super-creamy mac and cheese, and chicken parmesan potpie.
Offers a compilation of facts and folklore on a range of topics, including weather, gardening, pets, sports, and health.
A compilation of practical advice and folklore features weather forecasts for the United States, planting tables, health remedies, horoscopes, recipes, games and puzzles, and other entertaining and useful information
It's another new year celebrating everything under the Sun, including the Moon, with The Old Farmer's Almanac, America's oldest continuously published periodical! Always timely, topical, and distinctively "useful, with a pleasant degree of humor," the Almanac has been beloved for centuries by people from all walks of life. As the nation's iconic calendar, the 2019 edition will forecast cultural, culinary, and other life-changing trends; preview notable astronomical events; provide time- and money-saving tips for gardeners of all varieties; set the hook for best fishing days; forecast traditionally 80 percent-accurate weather; and cover a range of related topics, including anniversaries, folklore, husbandry, home remedies, recipes, amusement, contests, and more--too much more to mention--all in the inimitable way it has done since 1792. The soft cover Trade Edition is a step up from the classic Old Farmer's Almanac. It features 32 extra reference pages, better paper, and a more durable book-like cover. Be advised, there is no hole drilled into the Bookstore Edition. Some say it is too thick to drill. Others claim the hole is unnecessary, because this heftier Almanac would just bend any nail used to hang it. The real reason is--it's just perfect as is. Printed in the USA.

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