Volume 3 of The New Farmer's Almanac--360 pages of original agrarian content, essays, cartoons, imagery and historical snippets--harnesses the wisdom of over 120 contributors from our community of new farmers and ranchers. This volume explores the theme of The Commons, drawing from folklore, mathematical projections, empirical, emotional, and geographical observations of theory and praxis. Farmers hold space in many interwoven commons, and possibilities for our shared future would seem to rest on how these intersecting commons are governed--particularly at the juncture of humanity and ecology where we make our workplace. In re-visiting the Almanac format, we assert our version of Americana and equip ourselves for the challenges of rebuilding the food system and restoring a more democratic, more diverse, and more resilient foundation for society. We face a dystopian future, with guaranteed-unpredictable weather, the impending collapse of the fossil fuel economy, endlessly consolidating monopolies, and a country that is, for the first time in our history, majority urban. That's why this Almanac is a utopian publication, one that reminds today's farmers about the foundational concepts of an agrarian democracy--themselves utopian. But we also reject the self-propelling logic of techno-utopia--dependent upon extraction economies and enclosure of common resources. We orient ourselves instead toward the words of Ursula Le Guin, who reminds us that our intent in utopian thinking should not be "reactionary, nor even conservative, but simply subversive. It seems that the utopian imagination is trapped, like capitalism and industrialism and the human population, in a one-way future consisting only of growth." This tidy volume holds a civil, lived testimony from people whose work, lifeworld, and behavior patterns beamingly subvert the normative values of the macro economy called America.
A compilation of practical advice and folklore features weather forecasts for the United States, planting tables, health remedies, horoscopes, recipes, games and puzzles, and other entertaining and useful information
It’s another new year celebrating everything under the Sun, including the Moon, with The Old Farmer’s Almanac, America’s oldest continuously published periodical! Always timely, topical, and distinctively “useful, with a pleasant degree of humor,” the Almanac has been beloved for centuries by people from all walks of life. As the nation’s iconic calendar, the 2018 edition will mark the days, months, and seasons; preview astronomical events; and cover a range of related topics: trends, gardening, anniversaries, recipes, home remedies, pets, husbandry, folklore, amusement, contests, fishing, and more—too much more to mention—all in the inimitable way it has done since 1792.
Presents a compilation of practical advice and folklore, featuring weather forecasts for the United States, planting tables, health remedies, horoscopes, recipes, games and puzzles and other entertaining and useful information, all in an attractive layout with dozens of full-color pages.
Offers a compilation of facts and folklore on a range of topics, including weather, astronomy, gardening, animals, history, sports, and health.
In the fourth volume of this loved publication, the Greenhorns' diverse collaborators have created yet another delightful miscellany of writings and artwork--centered, this time round, on diversification, in all its forms. The New Farmer's Almanac, Vol IV features essays and poems from dozens of farmers, ranchers, ecologists, educators, food bank managers, grocers, gardeners, and other actors and advocates bound by their care for the land, the food system, and the preservation of the natural world. There are folk stories, reports on the racial distribution of farmland, recipes for hickory nut milk and healing and foraged tea. Toolboxes for seed-saving, indigenous land repatriation, and creating liberated space. Advice from old-timers and insights from the new. Meditations on failure, loved crops, and the wisdom of farm dogs. Here are stories about leaving, and of returning home to work the land; essays on the geography of self-discovery; reflections on trauma, both climatic and personal; and some practical guidance for farmers. Add to this hundreds of unique images, from lost-and-found postcards to inked watersheds to sketches of refugee gardens. Created by the Greenhorns, The New Farmer's Almanac is a place for public thinking and proactive literary inquiry into the future we share on the land and at the table. Shifting practices is a team sport, and with its original artwork, historic photographs, moon charts, essays, reading lists, proposals, and old-time manifestos, this is just the compendium to inspire your own part in the mix.
"In Chris Fink's debut work of fiction, America's rural core is cracked open to reveal moments of stark beauty and cruelty. Farmer's Almanac-a new Midwestern Gothic-is an imaginary handbook for rural living, as timeless and essential as its namesake. But this is no American pastoral. Fink's vision is more Orwell than Rockwell. Not since Winesburg, Ohio has a book so thoroughly plumbed the Midwestern character. A despairing farmer milks a dead cow, a baseball phenom chooses between the diamond and the dairy barn, and in the back of the school bus, a young girl fights back against her tormentors. Farmer's Almanac reports the new from mythical Odette County, Wisconsin, where the milk prices keep falling, and the forecast is not good." - back cover.
As surely as the Sun rises in the east and maple leaves turn color in autumn, The Old Farmer’s Almanac is back—and it’s better than ever! Recognized for generations by its familiar yellow cover, America’s best-loved annual and oldest continuously published periodical (now in its 224th year!) promises to be “useful, with a pleasant degree of humor,” once again fulfilling both the mission set forth by its founder, Robert B. Thomas, and readers’ expectations. This edition is packed with wit, wisdom, tips, advice, facts, fun, and recipes, including: • traditionally 80 percent–accurate weather forecasts • how to make sausages at home • “creatures from hell” • grow your own beer (ingredients) • time- and money-saving tips • unmasked mysteries of plant seed dispersal • bale, key, and concrete block gardens • quirky origins of American horse breeds • history, lore, and more about birthstones Plus, Moon phases and other celestial sightings, tides, gardening tables, best days to do things, and more. Added value this year: • 96 full-color pages • full-color winter and summer weather maps • updated Reference section Often imitated, but never equaled. Accept no substitutes!
Get thousands of facts at your fingertips with this essential resource. The World Almanac® and Book of Facts is America's top-selling reference book of all time, with more than 82 million copies sold. For more than 150 years, this compendium of information has been the authoritative source for all your entertainment, reference, and learning needs. The 2019 edition of The World Almanac reviews the events of 2018 and will be your go-to source for questions on any topic in the upcoming year. Praised as a "treasure trove of political, economic, scientific and educational statistics and information" by The Wall Street Journal, The World Almanac and Book of Facts will answer all of your trivia needs on demand—from history and sports to geography, pop culture, and much more. Features include: The World at a Glance: This annual feature of The World Almanac provides a quick look at the surprising stats and curious facts that define the changing world. Statistical Spotlight: A popular new feature highlights statistics relevant to the biggest stories of the year. These data visualizations provide important context and new perspectives to give readers a fresh angle on important issues. 2018 Election Results: The World Almanac provides a comprehensive look at the entire 2018 election process, from early primaries to complete Election Day results for House, Senate, and gubernatorial races. The Year in Review: The World Almanac takes a look back at 2018 while providing all the information you'll need in 2019. 2018—Top 10 News Topics: The editors of The World Almanac list the top stories that held the world's attention in 2018. 2018—Year in Sports: Hundreds of pages of trivia and statistics that are essential for any sports fan, featuring complete coverage of the Winter Olympic Games in South Korea, World Cup men's soccer, the World Series, and much more. 2018—Year in Pictures: Striking full-color images from around the world in 2018, covering news, entertainment, science, and sports. 2018—Offbeat News Stories: The World Almanac editors found some of the strangest news stories of the year. World Almanac Editors' Picks: Time Capsule: The World Almanac lists the items that most came to symbolize the year 2018, from news and sports to pop culture.
In Mexico, the poinsettia is called flor de la Nochebuenao flower of the Holy Night. At Christmastime, the flower blooms and flourishes, the quite exquisite red stars lighting up the countryside. This Mexican legend tells how the poinsettia came to be, through a little girl's unselfish gift to the Christ Child. Beloved Newbery honor-winning author and Caldecott honor-winning illustrator Tomie dePaola has embraced the legend using his own special feeling for Christmas. His glorious paintings capture not only the brilliant colors of Mexico and its art, but also the excitement of the children preparing for Christmas and the hope of Lucida, who comes to see what makes a gift truly beautiful.
Presents over two hundred recipes for such comfort foods as onion and bacon tarts, potato and artichoke au gratin, sausage meat loaf, super-creamy mac and cheese, and chicken parmesan potpie.
The American classic now mixes wacky and wonderful stories, facts, and activities for children, covering weather, astronomy, gardening, history, the outdoors, nature, sports, and more. Original.
Poor Richard's Almanack is one of Benjamin Franklin's most charming creations. He delighted in cloaking his writing behind a variety of literary personas, and Richard Saunders remains one of his most beloved. Some critics have complained that Poor Richard reveals the shallow materialism at the heart of Franklin's homespun philosophy and, by extension, at the heart of America itself. Even so, Almanack holds a central place in understanding Franklin and his evolution from humble tradesman to founding father as well as providing a window into colonial America. Franklin's sharp wit still retains its ability to surprise and delight readers today.
As the average age of America's farmers continues to rise, we face serious questions about what farming will look like in the near future, and who will be growing our food. Many younger people are interested in going into agriculture, especially organic farming, but cannot find affordable land, or lack the conceptual framework and practical information they need to succeed in a job that can be both difficult and deeply fulfilling. In Fruitful Labor, Mike Madison meticulously describes the ecology of his own small family farm in the Sacramento Valley of California. He covers issues of crop ecology such as soil fertility, irrigation needs, and species interactions, as well as the broader agroecological issues of the social, economic, regulatory, and technological environments in which the farm operates. The final section includes an extensive analysis of sustainability on every level. Pithy, readable, and highly relevant, this book covers both the ecology and the economy of a truly sustainable agriculture. Although Madison's farm is unique, the broad lessons he has gleaned from his more than three decades as an organic farmer will resonate strongly with the new generation of farmers who work the land, wherever they might live. *This book is part of Chelsea Green Publishing's NEW FARMER LIBRARY series, where we collect innovative ideas, hard-earned wisdom, and practical advice from pioneers of the ecological farming movement--for the next generation. The series is a collection of proven techniques and philosophies from experienced voices committed to deep organic, small-scale, regenerative farming. Each book in the series offers the new farmer essential tips, inspiration, and first-hand knowledge of what it takes to grow food close to the land.
Contains the introductory pages to the 1757 edition of the Almanac, and many anecdotes and essays.
Victorian Britain, with its maritime economy and strong links between government and scientific enterprises, founded an office to collect meteorological statistics in 1854 in an effort to foster a modern science of the weather. But as the office turned to prediction rather than data collection, the fragile science became a public spectacle, with its forecasts open to daily scrutiny in the newspapers. And meteorology came to assume a pivotal role in debates about the responsibility of scientists and the authority of science. Studying meteorology as a means to examine the historical identity of prediction, Katharine Anderson offers here an engrossing account of forecasting that analyzes scientific practice and ideas about evidence, the organization of science in public life, and the articulation of scientific values in Victorian culture. In Predicting the Weather, Anderson grapples with fundamental questions about the function, intelligibility, and boundaries of scientific work while exposing the public expectations that shaped the practice of science during this period. A cogent analysis of the remarkable history of weather forecasting in Victorian Britain, Predicting the Weather will be essential reading for scholars interested in the public dimensions of science.

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