This new edition of Bart Ehrman's highly successful introduction approaches the New Testament from a consistently historical and comparative perspective, emphasizing the rich diversity of the earliest Christian literature. Rather than shying away from the critical problems presented by these books, Ehrman addresses the historical and literary challenges they pose and shows why scholars continue to argue over such significant issues as how the books of the New Testament came into being, what they mean, how they relate to contemporary Christian and non-Christian literature, and how they came to be collected into a canon of Scripture. Distinctive to this study is its emphasis on the historical, literary, and religious milieu of the Greco-Roman world, including early Judaism. As part of its historical orientation, this text also discusses works by other Christian writers who were roughly contemporary with the New Testament, such as the Gospel of Thomas, the Apocalypse of Peter, and the letters of Ignatius. The volume is enhanced by two color inserts, one on illuminated manuscripts and the other on archaeology. New to this edition: . Additional material on archaeology, including a new eight-page color insert . "What to Expect" and "At a Glance" boxes that provide summaries of the material covered in each chapter . A Website Study Guide at http: //www.oup.com/us/ehrman, offering chapter summaries, glossary terms, guides for reading, and self-quizzes for students. . Several new "Something to Think About" and "Some More Information" boxes . More extensive treatments of Judaism and of the role of women in the history of early Christianity . Nine new illustrations . An Instructor's Manual containing chapter summaries, discussion questions, and possible examination questions Ideal for undergraduate and seminary classes in the New Testament, Biblical Studies, and Christian Origins, The New Testament: A Historical Introduction to the Early Christian Writings, 3/e, is an accessible, clearly written introduction that encourages students to consider the historical issues surrounding these writings."
This lucid introduction approaches the New Testament from a consistently historical and comparative perspective, emphasizing the rich diversity of the earliest Christian literature. Rather than styling away from the critical problems presented by these books, Ehrman addresses the historical and literary challenges they pose and shows why scholars continue to argue over such significant issues as how the books of the New Testament came into being, who produced them, what they mean, how they relate to contemporary Christian and non-Christian liteature, and how how they came to be collected into a canon of Scripture. Distinctive to this study is its emphasis on the historical, literary, and religious milieu of the Greco-Roman world, including early Judiasm. As part of its historical orientation, this text also discusses works by other Christian writers who were roughly contemporary with the New Testament, such as the Gospel of Thomas, the Apocalypse of Peter, the letters of Ignatius. Instead of simply setting forth scholarly views without explanations, Ehrman includes the evidence of scholars that have found persuasive for their views, engaging students and demonstrating why scholars have taken the positions they have. Ideal for undergraduate and seminary classes in the New Testament, Biblical Studies, and Christian Origins, The New Testament: A Historical Introduction to the Early Christian Writings, Second Edition, is an accessible, clearly written introduction that encourages students to consider the historical issues surrounding these writings. The book is equally appealling to the wide non-academic readership interested in the Bible and the historical Jesus. Ehrman's The New Testament and Other Writings: A Reader serves as an ideal companion to this text. Features new to the second edition include expanded material covering Jesus, and the addition of boxes throughout addressing numerous topics, including alternative approaches to the historical Jesus andadditional material covering women. The new edition also includes a color photo insert.
The twenty-seven books of the New Testament were not the only writings produced by early Christians. Nor were they the only ones to be accepted, at one time or another, as sacred Scripture. Unfortunately, nearly all the other early Christian writings have been lost or destroyed. But approximately twenty-five books written at about the same time as the New Testament have survived--books that reveal the rich diversity of early Christian views about God, Jesus, the world, salvation, ethics,and ritual practice. This reader presents, for the first time in one volume, every Christian writing known to have been produced during the first hundred years of the church (30-130 C.E.). In addition to the New Testament itself, it includes other, noncanonical Gospels, Acts, Epistles, and Apocalypses, as well as additional important writings, such as those of the Apostolic Fathers. Each text is provided in an up-to-date and readable translation (including the NRSV for the New Testament), and introduced with a succinct and incisive discussion of its author, date of composition, and overarching themes. This second edition adds The Martyrdom of Polycarp, an important text that will enhance the collection's utility in the classroom. It also features Ehrman's new, accessible translations of many of the noncanonical works and provides updated introductions that incorporate the most recent scholarship. With an opening overview that shows how the canon of the New Testament came to be formulated--the process by which some Christian books came to be regarded as sacred Scripture whereas others came to be excluded--this accessible reader will meet the needs of students, scholars, and general readers alike. An ideal primary text for courses in the New Testament, Christian Origins, and Early Church History, it can be used in conjunction with its companion volume, the author's The New Testament: A Historical Introduction to the Early Christian Writings, 3/e (OUP, 2003).
The concise and more pedagogical version of The New Testament: A Historical Introduction to the Early Christian Writings, Fourth Edition, Bart D. Ehrman's A Brief Introduction to the New Testament, Second Edition, is the intriguing story of the early Christian writings - their authors, their subject, and their influence. How were they formed? Why were they written? What do they mean? How do they differ? And how did they come to be collected into a canon of Scripture as the New Testament?Presenting challenging material in a way that is both accessible and understandable, Ehrman takes a historical approach to these questions and builds his discussion based on context; he situates the writings of the New Testament in the social, cultural, and literary world of the early Roman Empire. His approach is also comparative, emphasizing similarities and differences between the texts. Bringing forth a multitude of perspectives, including those of various scholars in the field, he raisescritical issues while also exemplifying the richness and diversity to be found in the study of early Christian literature. Further enhancing the text, Ehrman incorporates time lines, maps, an extensive box program, a comprehensive glossary of over 200 hundred key terms that are also boldfaced at their first appearance in each chapter and conveniently collected at the end of that chapter, and over seventy photos - now in full color throughout.
This 2 Volume Set includes Bart Ehrman's New Testament: Historical Introduction to Early Christian Writings and New Testament and Other Early Christian Writings: A Reader
The life and death of Jesus of Nazareth and the beginnings of the movement which venerated him are of profound religious significance to Christian believers today. However, these events are also part of our common history and have had enormous influence on the development of Western civilization, They are, therefore, legitimate subjects of historical enquiry. The historical introduction to the New Testament investigates the foundation of the new religious movement in the life of Jesus, the experiences which acted as a catalyst on missionary activity after his death, the factors which led to a separation of the movement from Judaism, and the development of the ecclesiastical structure through which Christianity has influenced subsequent secular and religious history.
In übersichtlicher, gut lesbarer Form stellen die AutorInnen dieses Studienbuchs das Grundwissen der neutestamentlichen 'Einleitung' auf dem neuesten Stand der Fachdiskussion dar. Inhaltlich stehen die Einzelschriften im Vordergrund, die hinsichtlich ihrer Struktur, ihrer Entstehung (Zeit, Ort, Verfasser, Traditionen/Quellen, Teilungshypothesen) und ihres spezifischen Diskurses (kulturelles Milieu, Situation, Inhalte) diskutiert werden. Die AutorInnen der einzelnen Kapitel sind: Martin Ebner (Münster), Marlis Gielen (Salzburg), Gerd Häfner (München), Martin Karrer (Wuppertal), Matthias Konradt (Bern), Joachim Kügler (Bayreuth), Dietrich Rusam (Bonn), Thomas Schmeller (Frankfurt), Stefan Schreiber (Münster), Michael Theobald (Tübingen).
In Whose Word Is It? Bart Ehrman tells the story behind the mistakes and changes that ancient scribes made to the New Testament and shows the great impact they had on the Bible we use today. He makes the provocative case that many of our cherished biblical stories and widely held beliefs concerning the divinity of Jesus, the Trinity and the divine origins of the Bible itself stem from intentional and accidental alterations by scribes - alterations that dramatically affected all subsequent versions of the Bible.
A companion volume to Lost Christianities, this remarkable anthology of long-lost Christian writings that were never included in the New Testaments includes fifteen additional gospels, thirteen epistles, five non-canonical Acts of the Apostles, Apocalypes and Secret Books, and brief introductions to each. History Dual Main. (Scripture)
While the first American edition of this book, published more than a decade ago, was a revised translation of the German book, Einführung in das Neue Testament, this second edition of the first volume of the Introduction to the New Testament is no longer dependent upon a previously published German work. The author hopes that for the student of the New Testament it is a useful introduction into the many complex aspects of the political, cultural, and religious developments that characterized the world in which early Christianity arose and by which the New Testament and other early Christian writings were shaped.
Wie findet man das wahre Glück? Wie lässt sich Erfolg wirklich bemessen? Und wie geht man mit den Herausforderungen des Alltags wie Wut, Trauer und der Frage nach dem Sinn des Ganzen um? Was große Geister wie George Washington, Friedrich der Große, Weltklassesportler oder Top-Performer längst für sich entdeckt haben, liegt mit "Der tägliche Stoiker" erstmals gesammelt vor. New York Times-Bestsellerautor Ryan Holiday und Stephen Hanselman haben das Wissen der Stoiker in 366 zeitlose Lektionen verpackt und zeigen, dass die Philosophie des Stoizismus nicht nur zeitlos, sondern gerade für unsere hektische und unsichere Zeit ein Segen ist. Weisheit, Mut, Gerechtigkeitssinn und Selbstbeherrschung sowie Gelassenheit lassen sich erlernen und helfen uns, in der zunehmenden Komplexität unserer Welt zu bestehen. Die uralten Weisheiten der Stoiker, gesammelt und kommentiert, unterstützen bei diesen alltäglichen Herausforderungen.
This work has established itself as a classical text in the field of New Testament studies. Written in a readable, non-technical style, it has become an indispensable textbook and reference for teachers, students, clergy, and the educated layperson interested in a scholarly treatment of the New Testament and its background in the Judaic and Greco-Roman world.
This book introduces the New Testament in two senses: it not only provides basic literary and historical information on each of the twenty-seven writings but also orients readers to the religious, theological, and ethical issues related to the message and meaning of Jesus Christ. The overall goal is to help interested readers of the New Testament become informed, responsible interpreters of these writings and thereby enrich their personal faith and understanding. By giving special emphasis to how the New Testament has helped shape the church’s identity and theological outlook throughout the centuries, as well as the role it has played within the broader cultures of both East and West, this introduction also seeks to assist readers in exercising creative, informed leadership within their own communities of faith and in bringing a deeper understanding of early Christianity to their conversations with the wider public. Along with separate chapters devoted to each New Testament writing, there are chapters explaining how this collection of texts emerged as uniquely authoritative witnesses to the church’s faith; why they were recognized as canonical whereas other early Christian writings were not; how the four canonical Gospels are related to one another, including a discussion of the Synoptic Problem; how the Jesus tradition––his teachings, stories from his ministry, and the accounts of his suffering, death and resurrection––originated and developed into Gospels written in narrative form; and how the Gospels relate to Jesus Christ as he was and is. Also included is a chapter on the writings of Paul and how they emerged as a collection of authoritative texts for the church. This chapter includes a discussion of ancient letter-writing, special considerations for interpreting the Pauline writings, and Paul’s decisive influence within the history of the church and western culture.
An intriguing look at the early history of the Christian Church provides a study of these ancient forms of Christianity and how they came to be suppressed, reformed, or forgotten, discussing their key texts, theological beliefs, conflict with orthodoxy, historical development, and more. History Dual Main. (Religion--Christianity)
As ancient literature and a cornerstone of the Christian faith, the New Testament has exerted a powerful religious and cultural impact. But how much do we really know about its origins? Who were the people who actually wrote the sacred texts that became part of the Christian Bible? The New Testament: A Very Short Introduction authoritatively addresses these questions, offering a fresh perspective on the underpinnings of this profoundly influential collection of writings. In this concise, engaging book, noted New Testament scholar Luke Timothy Johnson takes readers on a journey back to the time of the early Roman Empire, when the New Testament was written in ordinary Greek (koine) by the first Christians. The author explains how the Gospels, Acts of the Apostles, and Revelation evolved into the canon of sacred writings for the Christian religion, and how they reflect a reinterpretation of the symbolic world and societal forces of first-century Greco-Roman and Jewish life. Equally important, readers will find both a positive and critical reading of the New Testament--one that looks beyond its theological orientation to reveal an often-surprising diversity of viewpoints. This one-of-a-kind introduction engages four distinct dimensions of the earliest Christian writings--anthropological, historical, religious, and literary--to provide readers with a broad conceptual and factual framework. In addition, the book takes an in-depth look at compositions that have proven to be particularly relevant over the centuries, including Paul's letters to the Corinthians and Romans and the Gospels of John, Mark, Matthew, and Luke. Ideal for general readers and students alike, this fascinating resource characterizes the writing of the New Testament not as an unknowable abstraction or the product of divine intervention, but as an act of human creativity by people whose real experiences, convictions, and narratives shaped modern Christianity.
In einer Reihe von Schriften zur Geschichte von Friedrich Engels steht auch diese Schrift. Dabei zieht er Parallelen zu seinen sozialreformerischen Ideen. - Interessant zu lesen für sozial oder christlich interessierte Menschen.

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