This book is an interdisciplinary introduction to optical collapse of laser beams, which is modelled by singular (blow-up) solutions of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. With great care and detail, it develops the subject including the mathematical and physical background and the history of the subject. It combines rigorous analysis, asymptotic analysis, informal arguments, numerical simulations, physical modelling, and physical experiments. It repeatedly emphasizes the relations between these approaches, and the intuition behind the results. The Nonlinear Schrödinger Equation will be useful to graduate students and researchers in applied mathematics who are interested in singular solutions of partial differential equations, nonlinear optics and nonlinear waves, and to graduate students and researchers in physics and engineering who are interested in nonlinear optics and Bose-Einstein condensates. It can be used for courses on partial differential equations, nonlinear waves, and nonlinear optics. Gadi Fibich is a Professor of Applied Mathematics at Tel Aviv University. “This book provides a clear presentation of the nonlinear Schrodinger equation and its applications from various perspectives (rigorous analysis, informal analysis, and physics). It will be extremely useful for students and researchers who enter this field.” Frank Merle, Université de Cergy-Pontoise and Institut des Hautes Études Scientifiques, France
This book provides a self-contained presentation of classical and new methods for studying wave phenomena that are related to the existence and stability of solitary and periodic travelling wave solutions for nonlinear dispersive evolution equations. Simplicity, concrete examples, and applications are emphasized throughout in order to make the material easily accessible. The list of classical nonlinear dispersive equations studied includes Korteweg-de Vries, Benjamin-Ono, and Schrodinger equations. Many special Jacobian elliptic functions play a role in these examples. The author brings the reader to the forefront of knowledge about some aspects of the theory and motivates future developments in this fascinating and rapidly growing field. The book can be used as an instructive study guide as well as a reference by students and mature scientists interested in nonlinear wave phenomena.
The ?eld of applied nonlinear dynamics has attracted scientists and engineers across many different disciplines to develop innovative ideas and methods to study c- plex behavior exhibited by relatively simple systems. Examples include: population dynamics, ?uidization processes, applied optics, stochastic resonance, ?ocking and ?ightformations,lasers,andmechanicalandelectricaloscillators. Acommontheme among these and many other examples is the underlying universal laws of nonl- ear science that govern the behavior, in space and time, of a given system. These laws are universal in the sense that they transcend the model-speci?c features of a system and so they can be readily applied to explain and predict the behavior of a wide ranging phenomena, natural and arti?cial ones. Thus the emphasis in the past decades has been in explaining nonlinear phenomena with signi?cantly less att- tion paid to exploiting the rich behavior of nonlinear systems to design and fabricate new devices that can operate more ef?ciently. Recently, there has been a series of meetings on topics such as Experimental Chaos, Neural Coding, and Stochastic Resonance, which have brought together many researchers in the ?eld of nonlinear dynamics to discuss, mainly, theoretical ideas that may have the potential for further implementation. In contrast, the goal of the 2007 ICAND (International Conference on Applied Nonlinear Dynamics) was focused more sharply on the implementation of theoretical ideas into actual - vices and systems.
Self-focusing has been an area of active scientific investigation for nearly 50 years. This book presents a comprehensive treatment of this topic and reviews both theoretical and experimental investigations of self-focusing. This book should be of interest to scientists and engineers working with lasers and their applications. From a practical point of view, self-focusing effects impose a limit on the power that can be transmitted through a material medium. Self-focusing also can reduce the threshold for the occurrence of other nonlinear optical processes. Self-focusing often leads to damage in optical materials and is a limiting factor in the design of high-power laser systems. But it can be harnessed for the design of useful devices such as optical power limiters and switches. At a formal level, the equations for self-focusing are equivalent to those describing Bose-Einstein condensates and certain aspects of plasma physics and hydrodynamics. There is thus a unifying theme between nonlinear optics and these other disciplines. One of the goals of this book is to connect the extensive early literature on self-focusing, filament-ation, self-trapping, and collapse with more recent studies aimed at issues such as self-focusing of fs pulses, white light generation, and the generation of filaments in air with lengths of more than 10 km. It also describes some modern advances in self-focusing theory including the influence of beam nonparaxiality on self-focusing collapse. This book consists of 24 chapters. Among them are three reprinted key landmark articles published earlier. It also contains the first publication of the 1964 paper that describes the first laboratory observation of self-focusing phenomena with photographic evidence.
This book provides a comprehensive introduction to the mathematical theory of nonlinear problems described by elliptic partial differential equations. These equations can be seen as nonlinear versions of the classical Laplace equation, and they appear as mathematical models in different branches of physics, chemistry, biology, genetics, and engineering and are also relevant in differential geometry and relativistic physics. Much of the modern theory of such equations is based on the calculus of variations and functional analysis. Concentrating on single-valued or multivalued elliptic equations with nonlinearities of various types, the aim of this volume is to obtain sharp existence or nonexistence results, as well as decay rates for general classes of solutions. Many technically relevant questions are presented and analyzed in detail. A systematic picture of the most relevant phenomena is obtained for the equations under study, including bifurcation, stability, asymptotic analysis, and optimal regularity of solutions. The method of presentation should appeal to readers with different backgrounds in functional analysis and nonlinear partial differential equations. All chapters include detailed heuristic arguments providing thorough motivation of the study developed later on in the text, in relationship with concrete processes arising in applied sciences. A systematic description of the most relevant singular phenomena described in this volume includes existence (or nonexistence) of solutions, unicity or multiplicity properties, bifurcation and asymptotic analysis, and optimal regularity. The book includes an extensive bibliography and a rich index, thus allowing for quick orientation among the vast collection of literature on the mathematical theory of nonlinear phenomena described by elliptic partial differential equations.
Mathematical Analysis of Evolution, Information, and Complexity deals with the analysis of evolution, information and complexity. The time evolution of systems or processes is a central question in science, this text covers a broad range of problems including diffusion processes, neuronal networks, quantum theory and cosmology. Bringing together a wide collection of research in mathematics, information theory, physics and other scientific and technical areas, this new title offers elementary and thus easily accessible introductions to the various fields of research addressed in the book.
The field of nonlinear dispersive waves has developed enormously since the work of Stokes, Boussinesq and Korteweg–de Vries (KdV) in the nineteenth century. In the 1960s, researchers developed effective asymptotic methods for deriving nonlinear wave equations, such as the KdV equation, governing a broad class of physical phenomena that admit special solutions including those commonly known as solitons. This book describes the underlying approximation techniques and methods for finding solutions to these and other equations. The concepts and methods covered include wave dispersion, asymptotic analysis, perturbation theory, the method of multiple scales, deep and shallow water waves, nonlinear optics including fiber optic communications, mode-locked lasers and dispersion-managed wave phenomena. Most chapters feature exercise sets, making the book suitable for advanced courses or for self-directed learning. Graduate students and researchers will find this an excellent entry to a thriving area at the intersection of applied mathematics, engineering and physical science.
This textbook presents the essential parts of the modern theory of nonlinear partial differential equations, including the calculus of variations. After a short review of results in real and functional analysis, the author introduces the main mathematical techniques for solving both semilinear and quasilinear elliptic PDEs, and the associated boundary value problems. Key topics include infinite dimensional fixed point methods, the Galerkin method, the maximum principle, elliptic regularity, and the calculus of variations. Aimed at graduate students and researchers, this textbook contains numerous examples and exercises and provides several comments and suggestions for further study.
Chaos in Partial Differential Equations is at its fast developing stage. The present book presents an overall survey on the existing results from the recent development.
This authoritative text (the second part of a complete MSc course) provides mathematical methods required to describe images, image formation and different imaging systems, coupled with the principle techniques used for processing digital images. It is based on a course for postgraduates reading physics, electronic engineering, telecommunications engineering, information technology and computer science. This book relates the methods of processing and interpreting digital images to the ‘physics’ of imaging systems. Case studies reinforce the methods discussed, with examples of current research themes. Provides mathematical methods required to describe images, image formation and different imaging systems Outlines the principle techniques used for processing digital images Relates the methods of processing and interpreting digital images to the ‘physics’ of imaging systems
This book is a unique selection of work by world-class experts exploring the latest developments in Hamiltonian partial differential equations and their applications. Topics covered within are representative of the field’s wide scope, including KAM and normal form theories, perturbation and variational methods, integrable systems, stability of nonlinear solutions as well as applications to cosmology, fluid mechanics and water waves. The volume contains both surveys and original research papers and gives a concise overview of the above topics, with results ranging from mathematical modeling to rigorous analysis and numerical simulation. It will be of particular interest to graduate students as well as researchers in mathematics and physics, who wish to learn more about the powerful and elegant analytical techniques for Hamiltonian partial differential equations.
A modern classic, Einstein’s Dreams is a fictional collage of stories dreamed by Albert Einstein in 1905, about time, relativity and physics. As the defiant but sensitive young genius is creating his theory of relativity, a new conception of time, he imagines many possible worlds. In one, time is circular, so that people are fated to repeat triumphs and failures over and over. In another, there is a place where time stands still, visited by lovers and parents clinging to their children. In another, time is a nightingale, sometimes trapped by a bell jar. Now translated into thirty languages, Einstein’s Dreams has inspired playwrights, dancers, musicians, and painters all over the world. In poetic vignettes, it explores the connections between science and art, the process of creativity, and ultimately the fragility of human existence.
The first book of its kind to introduce the fundamentals, basic features and models, potential applications and novel phenomena and its important applications in liquid crystal technology. Recognized leader in the field Gaetano Assanto outlines the peculiar characteristics of nematicons and the promise they have for the future growth of this captivating new field.
More than 14 percent of the PhD's awarded in the United States during the first four decades of the twentieth century went to women, a proportion not achieved again until the 1980s. This book is the result of a study in which the authors identified all of the American women who earned PhD's in mathematics before 1940, and collected extensive biographical and bibliographical information about each of them. By reconstructing as complete a picture as possible of this group of women, Green and LaDuke reveal insights into the larger scientific and cultural communities in which they lived and worked. The book contains an extended introductory essay, as well as biographical entries for each of the 228 women in the study. The authors examine family backgrounds, education, careers, and other professional activities. They show that there were many more women earning PhD's in mathematics before 1940 than is commonly thought. Extended biographies and bibliographical information are available from the companion website for the book: www.ams.org/bookpages/hmath-34. The material will be of interest to researchers, teachers, and students in mathematics, history of mathematics, history of science, women's studies, and sociology. The data presented about each of the 228 individual members of the group will support additional study and analysis by scholars in a large number of disciplines.
As the open-source and free competitor to expensive software like MapleTM, Mathematica®, Magma, and MATLAB®, Sage offers anyone with access to a web browser the ability to use cutting-edge mathematical software and display his or her results for others, often with stunning graphics. This book is a gentle introduction to Sage for undergraduate students toward the end of Calculus II (single-variable integral calculus) or higher-level course work such as Multivariate Calculus, Differential Equations, Linear Algebra, or Math Modeling. The book assumes no background in computer science, but the reader who finishes the book will have learned about half of a first semester Computer Science I course, including large parts of the Python programming language. The audience of the book is not only math majors, but also physics, engineering, finance, statistics, chemistry, and computer science majors.
The third of three volumes on partial differential equations, this is devoted to nonlinear PDE. It treats a number of equations of classical continuum mechanics, including relativistic versions, as well as various equations arising in differential geometry, such as in the study of minimal surfaces, isometric imbedding, conformal deformation, harmonic maps, and prescribed Gauss curvature. In addition, some nonlinear diffusion problems are studied. It also introduces such analytical tools as the theory of L Sobolev spaces, H lder spaces, Hardy spaces, and Morrey spaces, and also a development of Calderon-Zygmund theory and paradifferential operator calculus. The book is aimed at graduate students in mathematics, and at professional mathematicians with an interest in partial differential equations, mathematical physics, differential geometry, harmonic analysis and complex analysis
This book presents the mathematical study of vortices of the two-dimensional Ginzburg-Landau model, an important phenomenological model used to describe superconductivity. The vortices, identified as quantized amounts of vorticity of the superconducting current localized near points, are the objects of many observational and experimental studies, both past and present. The Ginzburg-Landau functionals considered include both the model cases with and without a magnetic field. The book acts a guide to the various branches of Ginzburg-Landau studies, provides context for the study of vortices, and presents a list of open problems in the field.
This book explores the interplay of bubble dynamics and shock waves, covering shock wave emission by laser generated bubbles, pulsating bubbles near boundaries, interaction of shock waves with bubble clouds, applications in shock wave lithotripsy, and more.
This book is a collection of recent reprints and new material on fundamentally nonlinear problems in structural systems which demonstrate localized responses to continuous inputs. It has two intended audiences. For mathematicians and physicists it should provide useful new insights into a classical yet rapidly developing area of application of the rich subject of dynamical systems theory. For workers in structural and solid mechanics it introduces a new methodology for dealing with structural localization and the related topic of the generation of solitary waves. Applications range from classical problems such as the buckling of cylindrical shells, twisted rods and pipelines, to the folding of geological strata, the failure of sandwich structures and the propagation of solitary waves in suspended beam systems. Contents:The Strut on an Elastic FoundationNumerics and DiscretizationTwisted RodsCylindrical ShellsOther Buckling ProblemsSolitary Waves Readership: Researchers in mathematics and engineering. Keywords:

Best Books