A fascinating fantasy for adults and children alike explores the world of mathematics as it recounts how math-hater Robert has twelve dreams in which a Number Devil demonstrates the delights of such mathematical concepts as prime and Fibonacci numbers, delving ever deeper into mathematical theory. Reprint.
Twelve-year-old Robert hates his maths teacher. He sets his class boring problems and won't let them use their calculators. Then in his dreams Robert meets the Number Devil who brings the subject magically to life, illustrating with wit and charm a world in which numbers can amaze and fascinate, where maths is nothing like the dreary, difficult process that so many of us dread. The Number Devil knows how to make maths devilishly simple.
In "Civil Wars," Hans Magnus Enzensberger, Germany's most astute literary and political critic, chronicles the global changes taking place as the result of evolving notions of nationalism, loyalty, and community. Enzensberger sees similar forces at work around the world, from America's racial uprisings in Los Angeles to the outright carnage in the former Yugoslavia. He argues that previous approaches to class or generational conflict have failed us, and that we are now confronted with an "autism of violence" a tendency toward self-destruction and collective madness.
Literary Nonfiction. Philosophy. Economics & Statistics. Translated from the German by Karen Leeder. Acclaimed poet, essayist, and cultural critic Hans Magnus Enzensberger takes a fresh, sobering look at our faith in statistics, our desire to predict the future, and our dependence on fortuitousness. Tracing the interface between chance and probability in medical diagnostics, risk models, economics, and the fluctuations of financial markets, FATAL NUMBERS goes straight to the heart of what it means to live, plan, and make decisions in a globalized, digitized, hyperlinked, science-driven, and uncertain world. Foreword by Gerd Gigerenzer. Illustrations by David Fried.
“A great storyteller.”—Paulo Coelho, author of The Alchemist Malba Tahan is the creation of a celebrated Brazilian mathematician looking for a way to bring some of the mysteries and pleasures of mathematics to a wider public. The adventures of Beremiz Samir, The Man Who Counted, take the reader on a journey in which, time and again, Samir summons his extraordinary mathematical powers to settle disputes, give wise advice, overcome dangerous enemies, and win for himself fame, fortune, and rich rewards. We learn of previous mathematicians and come to admire Samir’s wisdom and patience. In the grace of Tahan’s telling, these stories hold unusual delights for the reader.
A collection of short detective stories for young adults who are interested in applying high school level mathematics and physics to solving mysteries. The main character is Ravi, a 14-year-old math genius who helps the local police solve cases. Each chapter is a detective story with a mathematical puzzle at its core that Ravi is able to solve. The author invites the reader to solve the case on his or her own and then explains the mathematics used to find the solution to the puzzle. Illustrated by Karl H. Hofmann
Uncle Petros is a family joke. An ageing recluse, he lives alone in a suburb of Athens, playing chess and tending to his garden. If you didn't know better, you'd surely think he was one of life's failures. But his young nephew suspects otherwise. For Uncle Petros, he discovers, was once a celebrated mathematician, brilliant and foolhardy enough to stake everything on solving a problem that had defied all attempts at proof for nearly three centuries - Goldbach's Conjecture. His quest brings him into contact with some of the century's greatest mathematicians, including the Indian prodigy Ramanujan and the young Alan Turing. But his struggle is lonely and single-minded, and by the end it has apparently destroyed his life. Until that is a final encounter with his nephew opens up to Petros, once more, the deep mysterious beauty of mathematics. Uncle Petros and Goldbach's Conjecture is an inspiring novel of intellectual adventure, proud genius, the exhilaration of pure mathematics - and the rivalry and antagonism which torment those who pursue impossible goals.
While taking a class on infinity at Stanford in the late 1980s, Ravi Kapoor discovers that he is confronting the same mathematical and philosophical dilemmas that his mathematician grandfather had faced many decades earlier--and that had landed him in jail. Charged under an obscure blasphemy law in a small New Jersey town in 1919, Vijay Sahni is challenged by a skeptical judge to defend his belief that the certainty of mathematics can be extended to all human knowledge--including religion. Together, the two men discover the power--and the fallibility--of what has long been considered the pinnacle of human certainty, Euclidean geometry. As grandfather and grandson struggle with the question of whether there can ever be absolute certainty in mathematics or life, they are forced to reconsider their fundamental beliefs and choices. Their stories hinge on their explorations of parallel developments in the study of geometry and infinity--and the mathematics throughout is as rigorous and fascinating as the narrative and characters are compelling and complex. Moving and enlightening, A Certain Ambiguity is a story about what it means to face the extent--and the limits--of human knowledge.
This bilingual (German/English) edition of the talk given at the International Congress of Mathematicians, Berlin, 1998, with illustrations by K. H. Hofmann and an introduction by David Mumford, discusses the role of mathematics within our culture.
A new treasure trove of stories that make mathematical ideas come to life with an unusual cast of characters. This book explores mathematical concepts and topics such as real numbers, exponents, dimensions, and geometry in both serious and humorous ways. 50 line drawings.
Penrose the cat explores and experiences a variety of mathematical concepts, including infinity, the golden rectangle, and impossible figures.
An illustrated tale about the adventures of a mathematical cat; introducing the concept of pi, symmetry, and multiplication through a series of puzzles, games, charts, worksheets, and tables.
Galileo, Newton, Descartes, and Pascal too, All followed rabbit trails that led to something new. Lulu and Elizabeth are two girls who love to play with numbers, words, and (on occasion) toy swords. Join them on a grand adventure, where classic math and logic riddles lead the way through a world inspired by Lewis Carroll's poetry. Filled with engaging puzzles, tidbits about famous mathematicians, and a dash of humor, this interactive book is sure to inspire adults and children, alike, to follow their own rabbit trails into the magical world of mathematics.
The famous mathematical cat Penrose takes us on a trip though puzzleland, while sharing fascinating and challenging puzzles in this uniquely designed mini book. Each page's puzzle is introduced by our star Penrose or one of his quirky friends. Readers are treated to page after page of Penrose antics and problems, while the over 100 mind teasers stimulate and engage its readers gray cells, This book's mini format and fun graphics makes it hard to resist picking up, and its characters and puzzles are sure to entertain both kids or adults.
Fifteen-year-old Robert is a dreamer: one evening his eyes blur over and he literally disappears. Robert has become a time traveller, but with little control over his ability he seems doomed to wander forever - until he appears in 17th-century Amsterdam and finds a slim chance of returning home.
Math rocks! At least it does in the gifted hands of Sean Connolly, who blends middle school math with fantasy to create an exciting adventure in problem-solving. These word problems are perilous, do-or-die scenarios of blood-sucking vampires (How many months would it take a single vampire to completely take over a town of 500,000 people?), or a rowboat of 5 shipwrecked sailors with a single barrel of freshwater (How much can they drink, and for how long, before they go mad from thirst???). Each problem requires readers to dig deep into the tools they’re learning in school to figure out how to survive. Kids will love solving these problems. Sean Connolly knows how to make tough subjects exciting and he brings that same intuitive understanding of what inspires and challenges kids’ curiosity to the 24 problems in The Book of Perfectly Perilous Math. These problems are as fun to read as they are challenging to solve. They test readers on fractions, algebra, geometry, probability, expressions and equations, and more. Use geometry to fill in for the ship’s navigator and make it safely to the New World. Escape an evil Duke’s executioner by picking the right door—probability will save your neck.
Winner of multiple awards for educational fiction as well as quality fantasy, this charming story brings us the adventures of Julie in the Land of Mathematics. Julie is a young teen who struggles with her homework, especially math, until a mysterious Imaginary Number leads her into Mathematics. There she meets Al the gebra (who is like a zebra), and horses who represent elements on the Periodic chart. She sets off on a quest to find her way home, and in the process, learns the foundations of algebra and chemistry. Join Julie in her journey through Mathematics, where the Orders of Operations are actual places and chemistrees are real plants with atomic fruit. Will Julie ever get home? Written when the author was age fourteen, this work of fiction has been used in various school systems throughout the U.S to help supplement cross-curriculum learning. It can also be enjoyed as light fantasy reading.
If you've ever thought that mathematics and art don't mix, this stunning visual history of geometry will change your mind. As much a work of art as a book about mathematics, Beautiful Geometry presents more than sixty exquisite color plates illustrating a wide range of geometric patterns and theorems, accompanied by brief accounts of the fascinating history and people behind each. With artwork by Swiss artist Eugen Jost and text by math historian Eli Maor, this unique celebration of geometry covers numerous subjects, from straightedge-and-compass constructions to intriguing configurations involving infinity. The result is a delightful and informative illustrated tour through the 2,500-year-old history of one of the most important branches of mathematics.
When the teacher tells her class that they can think of almost everything as a math problem, one student acquires a math anxiety which becomes a real curse.
Not only Germany's most important poet, Hans Magnus Enzensberger is a provocative cultural essayist and one of Europe's leading political thinkers. This is intelligent and pointed poetry in the tradition of Brecht, humanely political and generously engaged. The poems have the ease and lightness of real mastery. They are moral in their insistence that human life can be lived well or badly, that it is up to us to choose well and to act wisely. Enzensberger is now writing with an increasing awareness of mortality, yet addresses social and political dangers and evils with undiminished urgency. Of Enzensberger's previous work: "Though the forms and focus of this poetry change over time, its intent and integrity remain consistent, as do its richness and clarity."-Publishers Weekly.

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