Magic, science and second sight in 17c Scottish Higlands, with new edition of Kirk's Secret Commonwealth.
The point of departure for this book is a phenomenon which is often referred to as the "return of the religious," a recent but apparently ubiquitous phenomenon which does not fit the modernist axiom of secularization, neither in the "developed" nor the "developing" worlds. In Africa, the last two decades have witnessed a remarkable and steady increase in the spread and reinforcement of occult and paranormal phenomena. The reports on these developments are not restricted to specific countries or areas; they cover the whole continent and surface in the most diverse images, media, stories, and rumors. The credence accorded to them has become an important factor that shapes social relationships in everyday life, economic and political actions, medical decisions, and religious adherence. (Series: African Studies / Afrikanische Studien - Vol. 47)
An evocative history of alternative religious practices in France in the second half of the nineteenth and beginning of the twentieth centuries that tells the interconnected stories of three movements: Mesmerism, Spiritism, and Occultism.
DIVDIVThe late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries are known as the Age of Enlightenment, a time of science and reason. But in this illuminating book, Paul Monod reveals the surprising extent to which Newton, Boyle, Locke, and other giants of rational thought and empiricism also embraced the spiritual, the magical, and the occult./divDIV /divDIVAlthough public acceptance of occult and magical practices waxed and waned during this period they survived underground, experiencing a considerable revival in the mid-eighteenth century with the rise of new antiestablishment religious denominations. The occult spilled over into politics with the radicalism of the French Revolution and into literature in early Romanticism. Even when official disapproval was at its strongest, the evidence points to a growing audience for occult publications as well as to subversive popular enthusiasm. Ultimately, finds Monod, the occult was not discarded in favor of “reason� but was incorporated into new forms of learning. In that sense, the occult is part of the modern world, not simply a relic of an unenlightened past, and is still with us today./div/div
The Kingdom of the Occult delivers the timely followup to Dr. Martin's best-selling The Kingdom of the Cults This book takes Dr. Walter Martin's comprehensive knowledge and his dynamic teaching style and forges a strong weapon against the world of the Occult-a weapon of the same scope and power as his phenomenal thirty-five year bestseller, The Kingdom of the Cults (over 875,000 sold). Chapters include: Witchcraft and Wicca, Satanism, Pagan Religions, Tools of the Occult, Demon Possession and Exorcism, Spiritual Warfare, etc. Features include: Each chapter contains: Quick Facts; History; Case Studies; Theology; Resources
Why have societies all across the world feared witchcraft? This book delves deeply into its context, beliefs, and origins in Europe's history The witch came to prominence--and often a painful death--in early modern Europe, yet her origins are much more geographically diverse and historically deep. In this landmark book, Ronald Hutton traces witchcraft from the ancient world to the early-modern stake. This book sets the notorious European witch trials in the widest and deepest possible perspective and traces the major historiographical developments of witchcraft. Hutton, a renowned expert on ancient, medieval, and modern paganism and witchcraft beliefs, combines Anglo-American and continental scholarly approaches to examine attitudes on witchcraft and the treatment of suspected witches across the world, including in Africa, the Middle East, South Asia, Australia, and North and South America, and from ancient pagan times to current interpretations. His fresh anthropological and ethnographical approach focuses on cultural inheritance and change while considering shamanism, folk religion, the range of witch trials, and how the fear of witchcraft might be eradicated.
A biography of the century's most strange men, Parsons was a primary architect of modern rocket science and co-founder of Jet Propulsion Laboratory - a crater on the moon was named after him. His secretive interests, however, were more bizarre and involved him in underwriting the notorious Aleister Crowley whose Book of the Law he considered to be the new Holy Book. Parsons also held numerous soirees where weird black magick rituals were performed under the eyes of none other than L Ron Hubbard who then made off with his money and his wife. Stranger than fiction
Taking an interdisciplinary perspective, Witchcraft and Folk Belief in the Age of Enlightenment represents the first in-depth investigation of Scottish witchcraft and witch belief post-1662, the period of supposed decline of such beliefs, an age which has been referred to as the 'long eighteenth century', coinciding with the Scottish Enlightenment. The late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries were undoubtedly a period of transition and redefinition of what constituted the supernatural, at the interface between folk belief and the philosophies of the learned. For the latter the eradication of such beliefs equated with progress and civilization but for others, such as the devout, witch belief was a matter of faith, such that fear and dread of witches and their craft lasted well beyond the era of the major witch-hunts. This study seeks to illuminate the distinctiveness of the Scottish experience, to assess the impact of enlightenment thought upon witch belief, and to understand how these beliefs operated across all levels of Scottish society.
This book both introduces the philosophy of science through examination of the occult and examines the occult rigorously enough to raise central issues in the philosophy of science. Placed in the context of the occult, philosophy of science issues become immediately understandable and forcefully compelling. Divergent views on astrology, parapsychology, and quantum mechanics mysticism emphasize topics standard to the philosophy of science. Such issues as confirmation and selection for testing, causality and time, explanation and the nature of scientific laws, the status of theoretical entities, the problem of demarcation, theory and observation, and science and values are discussed. Significantly revised, this second edition presents an entirely new section of quantum mechanics and mysticism including instructions from N. David Mermin for constructing a device which dramatically illustrates the genuinely puzzling phenomena of quantum mechanics. A more complete and current review of research on astrology has been included in this new edition, and the section on the problem of demarcation has been broadened.
Is the universe alive? Are there hidden connections within it, revealed in history and in sacred texts? Can we understand or even learn to control these secrets? Have we neglected an entirely separate science that works according to a different set of principles? Certainly by the time of the Renaissance in Europe, there were many thinkers who answered in the affirmative to all of these questions. Despite the growth of modern science and a general disenchantment of the world, the 'occult' or 'esoteric' tradition has evolved in the West, manifesting itself in such diverse groups as the Freemasons, the Mormons, Christian Scientists, the Theosophists, New Ageists and American Fundamentalism. Paradoxically, the turn to science and the triumph of evolution in the nineteenth century produced an explosion of occultism, increasing its power as a kind of super-science. Gothic, fantastic, and supernatural fiction flourished, while Spiritualism emerged as a serious inquiry into the possibility of contacting the dead. After all, if you could communicate with the living at great distances, why should a similar teletechnology not be possible to the other world? Disciplines had not yet hardened, and the borders were as yet undefined between parapsychology and psychology, between mythology and anthropology. Mesmerism became hypnotism, and the subconscious came to be recognized as more than a medium's stomping ground. This book describes the growth and meandering path of the occult tradition over the past five hundred years, and shows how the esoteric world view fits together.
Alchemists are generally held to be the quirky forefathers of science, blending occultism with metaphysical pursuits. This text challenges the widespread dismissal of alchemy as a largely insignificant historical footnote to science.
Horror Takes Its Time Looking for a thoughtful fright? Or perhaps a frightful thought? Packed with stories selected by one of today’s leading esoteric scholars, this book will do more than make your toes curl and your skin crawl. These tales reveal hidden truths, inspire forbidden pursuits, and divulge the secrets of magical initiation in the guise of fiction. Covering topics from rituals to hauntings to Satanism, this one-of-a-kind volume includes selections from: Aleister CrowleyAmbrose BierceArthur MachenEdgar Allan PoeRobert W. ChambersRalph Adams CramH.P. LovecraftDion FortuneSir Edward George Bulwer-LyttonBram Stoker As DuQuette writes in his introduction, horror takes its time. It creeps in, seeps in, and lingers. These stories will take you hours to read, but they will stay with you, biting at your heels from the shadows, eternally. Don’t say we didn’t warn you...
The essays in this Handbook, written by leading scholars working in the rapidly developing field of witchcraft studies, explore the historical literature regarding witch beliefs and witch trials in Europe and colonial America between the early fifteenth and early eighteenth centuries. During these years witches were thought to be evil people who used magical power to inflict physical harm or misfortune on their neighbours. Witches were also believed to have made pacts with the devil and sometimes to have worshipped him at nocturnal assemblies known as sabbaths. These beliefs provided the basis for defining witchcraft as a secular and ecclesiastical crime and prosecuting tens of thousands of women and men for this offence. The trials resulted in as many as fifty thousand executions. These essays study the rise and fall of witchcraft prosecutions in the various kingdoms and territories of Europe and in English, Spanish, and Portuguese colonies in the Americas. They also relate these prosecutions to the Catholic and Protestant reformations, the introduction of new forms of criminal procedure, medical and scientific thought, the process of state-building, profound social and economic change, early modern patterns of gender relations, and the wave of demonic possessions that occurred in Europe at the same time. The essays survey the current state of knowledge in the field, explore the academic controversies that have arisen regarding witch beliefs and witch trials, propose new ways of studying the subject, and identify areas for future research.
From wicked queens, beautiful princesses, elves, monsters, and goblins to giants, glass slippers, poisoned apples, magic keys, and mirrors, the characters and images of fairy tales have cast a spell over readers and audiences, both adults and children, for centuries. These fantastic stories have travelled across cultural borders, and been passed on from generation to generation, ever-changing, renewed with each re-telling. Few forms of literature have greater power to enchant us and rekindle our imagination than a fairy tale. But what is a fairy tale? Where do they come from and what do they mean? What do they try and communicate to us about morality, sexuality, and society? The range of fairy tales stretches across great distances and time; their history is entangled with folklore and myth, and their inspiration draws on ideas about nature and the supernatural, imagination and fantasy, psychoanalysis, and feminism. Marina Warner has loved fairy tales over a long writing life, and she explores here a multitude of tales through the ages, their different manifestations on the page, the stage, and the screen. From the phenomenal rise of Victorian and Edwardian literature to contemporary children's stories, Warner unfolds a glittering array of examples, from classics such as Red Riding Hood, Cinderella, and The Sleeping Beauty, the Grimm Brothers' Hansel and Gretel, and Hans Andersen's The Little Mermaid, to modern-day realizations including Walt Disney's Snow White and gothic interpretations such as Pan's Labyrinth. In ten succinct chapters, Marina Warner digs into a rich hoard of fairy tales in their brilliant and fantastical variations, in order to define a genre and evaluate a literary form that keeps shifting through time and history. Her book makes a persuasive case for fairy tale as a crucial repository of human understanding and culture.
From its earliest days, America served as an arena for the revolutions in alternative spirituality that eventually swept the globe. Esoteric philosophies and personas—from Freemasonry to Spiritualism, from Madame H. P. Blavatsky to Edgar Cayce—dramatically altered the nation’s culture, politics, and religion. Yet the mystical roots of our identity are often ignored or overlooked. Opening a new window on the past, Occult America presents a dramatic, pioneering study of the esoteric undercurrents of our history and their profound impact across modern life.
Mr. Lang’s book is the most curious imaginable. Written in 1691 by a Scotch divine, it is nothing less than a calm assumption of the existence at that time of a commonwealth of elves, fauns, and fairies, whose government, habits, etc., are minutely described upon the authority of "Men of Second Sight" (it is not clear whether the author himself was one of these by virtue of bis being a seventh son), the method of obtaining which gift is also carefully explained. These fairies are of a middle nature between man and angel; they inhabit subterranean abodes, which they change at each quarter of the year. "They are distributed in tribes and orders, and have children, nurses, marriages, deaths, and burials; their apparel and speech is like that of the people and country under which they live; they are said to have aristocratical rulers and laws, but no discernible religion, love, or devotion towards God," their weapons are most what solid earthly bodies, nothing of iron, but much of stone, like to yellow soft flint spa, shaped liked a barbed arrow-head, but flung like a dart, with great force." The moral character of these "subterraneans" is minutely described and the conclusion is, "But for swearing and intemperance, they are not observed so subject to those irregularities, as to envy, spite, hypocrisy, lying, and dissimulation." The author adds to the evidence given by his friends, etc., a letter from Lord Tarbott to the Hon. Robert Boyle, in which many additional instances of second sight are narrated.
Saunders Nursing Guide to Laboratory and Diagnostic Tests, 2nd Edition is the perfect guide to laboratory testing for both students and practicing nurses alike. Featuring the latest testing information organized alphabetically for quick reference, this resource offers test formats that emphasize the nurse's specific role in all aspects of the testing process. Basics the Nurse Needs to Know and Nursing Care sections for every laboratory test explain what the nurse is to do during the pre-, post- and actual test stages, and highlights the nursing responses to critical values, complications, patient teaching, and health promotion. A new companion Evolve website also offers a variety of learning resources and skills videos to help you master diagnostic procedures and perform accurate testing. Alphabetical organization of the laboratory tests (featuring alphabetical thumb tabs) makes every test easy to find. Also Called sections feature synonyms and abbreviations that help you identify specific tests. Purpose of the Test states the indications of each test. Basics the Nurse Needs to Know offers an explanation of each test in clear, simple language. Normal Values in standard and SI units include variations for gender and age, where relevant. How the Test is Done succinctly describes how each test is performed. Significance of Test Results list the diseases and disorders that are associated with abnormal findings. Interfering Factors list the factors, such as drugs, herbs, and improper specimen collection and handling, that inadvertently affect test results. Nursing Care is divided into Pretest, During the Test, and Posttest, listing in detail what the nurse does in the testing process. Nursing Response to Critical Values and Nursing Response to Complications detail what you should be alert for before, during, and after the test and how to manage dangerous situations. Explicit incorporation of nursing concerns related to lab tests can only be found in this lab book. Over 50 new and updated pieces of art highlight how results are interpreted, what equipment is used, and how various techniques are performed. Over 20 new tests prepare you for the types of tests you will encounter during your clinical experience. Patient Teaching icons make crucial nursing content easy to find. New Student Resources on Evolve feature a variety of supplemental learning tools. Skills materials, including skills checklists, PDFs of skills, and brief skills video clips, help you master specimen collection and basic diagnostic procedures. Patient handouts provide practical, useable materials to make your clinical experience easier. Audio pronunciations simplify the process of learning difficult terminology.

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