Losing our parents when we ourselves are adults is in the natural order of things, a rite of passage into true adulthood. But whether we lose them suddenly or after a prolonged illness, and whether we were close to or estranged from them, this passage proves inevitably more difficult than we thought it would be. A much-needed and knowledgeable discussion of this adult phenomenon, The Orphaned Adult validates the wide array of disorienting emotions that can accompany the death of our parents by sharing both the author's heart-felt experience of loss and the moving stories of countless adults who have shared their losses with him. From the recognition of our own mortality and sudden child-like sorrow to a sometimes-subtle change in identity or shift of roles in the surviving family, The Orphaned Adult guides readers through the storm of change this passage brings and anchors them with its compassionate and reassuring wisdom.
A compassionate discussion of how adults confront the death of their parents.
Losing our parents when we ourselves are adults is in the natural order of things, a rite of passage into true adulthood. But whether we lose them suddenly or after a prolonged illness, and whether we were close to or estranged from them, this passage proves inevitably more difficult than we thought it would be. A much-needed and knowledgeable discussion of this adult phenomenon, The Orphaned Adult validates the wide array of disorienting emotions that can accompany the death of our parents by sharing both the author's heart-felt experience of loss and the moving stories of countless adults who have shared their losses with him. From the recognition of our own mortality and sudden child-like sorrow to a sometimes-subtle change in identity or shift of roles in the surviving family, The Orphaned Adult guides readers through the storm of change this passage brings and anchors them with its compassionate and reassuring wisdom.
Offers advice on handling the grief brought on by a parent's death and looks at a parent's continuing influence on their adult children
A must-read for those who hope for revitalization of an aging, declining or plateaued church. "The Orphaned Generation" will turn the heart of your adult congregation toward young people, especially in small groups or Sunday school classes. Wilcher uses biblical principles to change your perspectives on young people, and your church. What Church Leaders are saying... "Revolutionary!" "A Game Changer!" "My aging congregation is learning it has exactly what young people hope for!" "Scott nails it." Ron Luce, " Founder and President of Teen Mania Ministries." "Absolutely the best book on what the Church should do for youth I have ever read hands down. You put into words years of unprocessed thoughts and feelings. Pastor Ken Wetmore "I recommend it strongly to every church leader and every adult in the church." Richard Ross, PhD, " Professor of student/family ministry, Southwestern Seminary, and co-founder of True Love Waits " "This should be required reading for each student ministry leader, who should then share a copy with the senior pastor, who should share a copy with every adult in the congregation." Roy Smith, " Director of Missions (Norfolk Area Baptist Association)" Reach Young People Without Alienating Your Mature Members Order your copy now. For more about the author, visit http: //scottwilcher.com or on facebook (search "The Orphaned Generation by Scott Wilcher") A discussion guide for use in small groups and Sunday school classes is now available at https: //www.createspace.com/3827718
We expect our parents to die before we do. Most of us agree that this is the “natural” order of things. Because of this assumption, people are often shocked by how deeply sad and even traumatized they feel when they lose a parent. They wonder why it takes so long to recover—how even months or years later the thought of Mom or Dad can cause them to burst into tears. This phenomenon happens for those who were close to their parents, those who were estranged, and those whose relationships were complicated. With the parent’s death, they feel a fundamental crack in their existence because this person, the one who knew them before they were born, is now gone. I have spent much of my professional life counseling people grieving the loss of a parent. Through their stories I have learned that there is no single defining experience of grief, no rules for how it should be expressed or how long it should last. But in grieving the loss of our parents, each in our own ways, we journey those well tread roads and learn more about ourselves in the process. How to Survive the Loss of a Parent offers no high-minded rules for grieving. It is just a conversation and a sharing of the experiences of others that I hope will bring people solace and insight. Knowing we are not alone is one of the best ways to heal.
Examines the pain middle-aged adults face when their parents pass away and explores the common feelings of guilt, sorrow and anger experienced as a result of their loss. Original.
When a parent dies, most adults are seized by an unexpected crisis that can trigger a profound transformation. Using in-depth interviews and national surveys, Dr Umberson explains why the death of a parent has strong effects on adults and looks at protective factors that help some individuals experience better mental health following the death than they did when the parent was alive. This is the first book to rely on sound scientific method to document the significant adverse effects of parental death for adults in a national population. Exploring the social and psychological risk factors that make some people more vulnerable than others, readers will come to view the loss of a parent in a new way: as a turning point in adult development.
Examining the psychology of mourning, common forms of parental loss, and medical, financial, and emotional consequences, this book addresses the psychological and practical realities of a parent's death and offers insight and information on making the experience less stressful
Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik served for more than forty years as the preeminent authority of centrist Orthodoxy, both as halakhic decisor and interpreter of Jewish thought and theology. In his own person he demonstrated that the ideal Torah sage is creative, open-minded, compassionate, visionary and realist, profoundly committed to the world of Torah and Halakhah and at the same time is a sophisticated modern thinker. His contributions to these areas have inspired his many students and others to revisit his writings and lectures in order to better fathom the work of this important figure in modern Orthodox thought. This collection of essays provides a panoramic view of his many interests, and thus serves as an introduction to the work of this seminal modern thinker.
Amid the crumbling splendour of wintertime Venice, two orphans are on the run. The mysterious Thief Lord offers shelter, but a terrible danger is gathering force...
Cheryl Nixon's book is the first to connect the eighteenth-century fictional orphan and factual orphan, emphasizing the legal concepts of estate, blood, and body. Examining novels by authors such as Eliza Haywood, Tobias Smollett, and Elizabeth Inchbald, and referencing never-before analyzed case records, Nixon reconstructs the narratives of real orphans in the British parliamentary, equity, and common law courts and compares them to the narratives of fictional orphans. The orphan's uncertain economic, familial, and bodily status creates opportunities to "plot" his or her future according to new ideologies of the social individual. Nixon demonstrates that the orphan encourages both fact and fiction to re-imagine structures of estate (property and inheritance), blood (familial origins and marriage), and body (gender and class mobility). Whereas studies of the orphan typically emphasize the poor urban foundling, Nixon focuses on the orphaned heir or heiress and his or her need to be situated in a domestic space. Arguing that the eighteenth century constructs the "valued" orphan, Nixon shows how the wealthy orphan became associated with new understandings of the individual. New archival research encompassing print and manuscript records from Parliament, Chancery, Exchequer, and King's Bench demonstrate the law's interest in the propertied orphan. The novel uses this figure to question the formulaic structures of narrative sub-genres such as the picaresque and romance and ultimately encourage the hybridization of such plots. As Nixon traces the orphan's contribution to the developing novel and developing ideology of the individual, she shows how the orphan creates factual and fictional understandings of class, family, and gender.
Examines the impact of a parent's death on all aspects of life, exploring its influence on relationships with family and friends and explaining how such an event provides an opportunity to redefine one's self-identity.
From New York Times bestselling author Melanie Dickerson comes a magical fairy tale retelling in The Orphan's Wish.
At forty-five, Jane McArdle has experienced her share of life's twists and turns. Yet she's shaken by the sudden death of her estranged half sister and the news that she's now the guardian of her orphaned niece, Lucy. Still nurturing unresolved grief from a marriage bookended by loss, as well as her guilt over her adult son's imperfect upbringing, Jane is her own worst enemy, content to focus on her small Michigan farm. Now, confronted with a traumatized eleven-year-old, the prickly empty nester is thrust into motherhood again, unsure she'll do any better this time. City girl Lucy is bewildered by aloof Aunt Jane and a new life in rural Michigan. The debilitating phobia Lucy has developed since her parents' deaths keeps her stuck in this place that's nothing like home. She secretly plots to run away to live with other relatives. Jane and Lucy must decide if they'll both endure yet another loss--each other--or if their paths will lead them to forge a new family together.
An epic fantasy filled with adventure, intrigue, and romance from Incarnate series author Jodi Meadows. This duology is perfect for fans of Graceling by Kristin Cashore, The Girl of Fire and Thorns by Rae Carson, and Shadow and Bone by Leigh Bardugo. When Princess Wilhelmina was a child, the Indigo Kingdom invaded her homeland. Ten years later, Wil and the other noble children who escaped are ready to fight back and reclaim Wil’s throne. To do so, Wil and her best friend, Melanie, infiltrate the Indigo Kingdom palace with hopes of gathering information that will help them succeed. But Wil has a secret—one that could change everything. Although magic has been illegal for a century, she knows her ability could help her save her kingdom. But magic creates wraith, and the deadly stuff is moving closer and destroying the land. And if the vigilante Black Knife catches her using magic, she may disappear like all the others. . . .
It was an accident... That was what the authorities said killed Charlie Kim's parents. And in Charlie's mind, that was how it had to be. An accident meant closure. An accident meant that the driven fifteen-year-old could move on, reassemble his life, and return to the carefully planned future that he had laid out for himself. But then Charlie's memories of his parents suddenly begin to vanish. And suspicions arise, calling the accidental nature of their deaths into question. Charlie can't help but doubt himself and the motives of those around him... Doubt leads to discovery. Charlie uncovers secrets that forever change his life. And thrust him and the group of teens that he is forced to unite-fellow orphans, whose parents have met similar fates-into the center of a secret battle between good and evil... A battle dating back to the war in Heaven. A war that only Charlie and the Orphans can end. But if they hope to stand a chance against the ultimate evil, they must first overcome their own inner demons.
Josephine Cravitz, the new girl in Awkward Falls, and her neighbor Thaddeus Hibble, a reclusive and orphaned boy inventor, become the targets of a mad cannibal from the local asylum for the criminally insane.
A guide to living life to the fullest after you have lost your parents. It seeks to help people to move beyond grief into the next stage of adult life, demonstrating how to turn a loss that one must accept into a possibility for growth and positive change. The author, Dr Shari Butler, explores the liberating effect the loss of our parents provides and teaches the reader how to understand this experience while releasing them from guilt. She provides exercises to help the reader cope with feeling sad, alone, scared, disconnected, guilty and/or remorseful, and presents a therapeutic plan to help discover and utilize a new kind of freedom.

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