Excerpt from The Outlines of a New Commentary on Solomon's Song: Drawn by the Help of Instructions From the East This notion, as appears by this book itfelf, at the clofe of the Annota tions on this Sacred Song. But at the fame time Mt'tbae/is feems to me to have carried things much too far, when he fuppofed it was not a Nup tial Song; and that the ground on which it was put among the other infpired writings, was merely to teat/3 Gm: A'pproéatioa of Marriage: a point which the Jews did not want to have efiablifhed among them in the days of Solomon and which was fupported by macb clearer proofs derived from other facred books of theirs. Uneafy upon this 111 my fituation, I examined this part of holy-writ with much greater Attention than I had ever done before; and endea voured to try, how far the method I baa' éefore maa'e afe of, in illuf'trating A 4. Other. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
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General Editor Lloyd J. Ogilvie has brought together exceptional preachers who blend sound scholarship with life-related illustrations and useful outlines for teaching and preaching. This twelve-volume set covers the entire New Testament and is a perfect resource for pastors and teachers. Each volume in the series includes: Paragraph-by-paragraph exposition Fresh insights into scripture Contemporary applications Outlines and illustrations Innovative ideas for communicating God's Word with vigor and vitality
This verse-by-verse commentary offers a fresh reading of an intriguing book of the Old Testament.
Based on the Revised Standard Version -- Second Catholic Edition, this 15th volume in the popular Bible study series leads readers through a penetrating study of the Books of Proverbs, Ecclesiastes and Song of Solomon using the biblical text itself and the Church's own guidelines for understanding the Bible. Ample notes accompany each page, providing fresh insights and commentary by renowned Bible teachers Scott Hahn and Curtis Mitch, as well as time-tested interpretations from the Fathers of the Church. They provide rich historical, cultural, geographical or theological information pertinent to the Old Testament book - information that bridges the distance between the biblical world and our own. The Ignatius Study Bible also includes Topical Essays, Word Studies and Charts. The Topical Essays explore the major themes of Proverbs, Ecclesiastes and Song of Solomon, often relating them to the teachings of the Church. The Word Studies explain the background to important Bible terms, while the Charts summarize crucial biblical information "at a glance". Each page includes an easy-to-use Cross-Reference Section. Study Questions are provided for each chapter that can deepen your personal study of God's Word. There is also an introductory essay covering questions of authorship, date, destination, structure and themes. Also included is an outline of Proverbs, Ecclesiastes and Song of Solomon as well as several maps.
The NIV Application Commentary Ecclesiastes/Song of Songs. Ecclesiastes and Song of Songs have always presented particular challenges to their readers, especially if those readers are seeking to understand them as part of Christian Scripture. Ecclesiastes regularly challenges the reader as to grammar and syntax. The interpretation even of words which occur frequently in the book is often unclear and a matter of dispute, partly because there is frequent word-play in the course of the argument. The argument is itself complex and sometimes puzzling and has often provoked the charge of inconsistency or outright self-contradiction. When considered in the larger context of the OT, Ecclesiastes stands out as an unusual book, whose connection with the main stream of biblical tradition seems tenuous. We find ourselves apparently reading about the meaninglessness of life and the certainty of death in a universe in which God is certainly present but is distant and somewhat uninvolved. When considered in the context of the NT, the dissonance between Ecclesiastes and its scriptural context seems even greater; for if there is one thing that we do not find in this book, it is the joy of resurrection. Perhaps this is one reason why Ecclesiastes is seldom read or preached on in modern churches. The Song of Songs (also known as the Song of Solomon) has been read, historically, by Christians, in two primary ways—as a text which concerns the love and sexual intimacy of human beings and as a text which uses the language of human love and intimacy to speak of something else—the relationship between Christ and the church. Christians have often felt that they must choose between these options—that a text about human love and sexual intimacy could not be at the same time a spiritual text. It is one of the challenges of reading the Song to explore how far this is necessarily true and how far Christian readers have been influenced in their reading more by Platonism and Gnosticism than by biblical thinking about the nature of the human being and of human sexuality. Another challenge is to discover whether the Song is really one “song” at all, or simply a haphazard collection of shorter poems cast together because of their common theme of love; and still another is to gain clarity on what, precisely, is the connection between the Song and Solomon. This commentary sets out to wrestle honestly with all the challenges of reading these biblical books—the challenges of reading the texts in themselves, and the challenges of reading them as intrinsic parts of Christian Scripture. Using the standard structure of the NIVAC series, it explores their “original meaning,” the “bridging contexts” that enable their journey to the present, and their “contemporary significance.” In the course of the exploration, these books are seen to be deeply relevant in what they have to say both to the contemporary church and the contemporary culture.

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