An authoritative account of the fascinating plant life of China, written by two botanical experts. Chinese plant life is estimated to include up to 30000 species and extends from the Himalayan snow line across a diversity of habitats to the lush tropical south. Although for many years access to Chinese plants was limited, the present situation provides an opportunity for a new and authoritative assessment of botanical treasure-houses such as Yunnan and Sichuan. It will be of interest to those working in agriculture, alternative medicine, plant conservation, ecology, genetics, horticulture, molecular biology and taxonomy.
A unique addition to the botanical literature, this book presents the flora of China in its astonishing diversity.
A guidebook to sections of the Great Wall of China, northern China, and Beijing includes historical and cultural details, practical travel advice, and recommendations for accommodations, restaurants, and attractions.
Ein neuer Blick auf alte Freunde Erstaunliche Dinge geschehen im Wald: Bäume, die miteinander kommunizieren. Bäume, die ihren Nachwuchs, aber auch alte und kranke Nachbarn liebevoll umsorgen und pflegen. Bäume, die Empfindungen haben, Gefühle, ein Gedächtnis. Unglaublich? Aber wahr! – Der Förster Peter Wohlleben erzählt faszinierende Geschichten über die ungeahnten und höchst erstaunlichen Fähigkeiten der Bäume. Dazu zieht er die neuesten wissenschaftlichen Erkenntnisse ebenso heran wie seine eigenen unmittelbaren Erfahrungen mit dem Wald und schafft so eine aufregend neue Begegnung für die Leser: Wir schließen Bekanntschaft mit einem Lebewesen, das uns vertraut schien, uns aber hier erstmals in seiner ganzen Lebendigkeit vor Augen tritt. Und wir betreten eine völlig neue Welt ...
From the moment I learned we were moving to China to our return home, you will read about our amazing and bizarre experiences. During the years in China I had sent newsletters to family and friends about our adventures, but upon our return home many people still wanted me to write a book. Finally, I agreed to begin writing. I played on our name for the title and then began telling my story. Not only did I want to write about our experiences, I also wanted it to be a help to those going to live or do business in a very different culture upside-down from what we consider normal. Consequently, I have written Life In China as a cross between a memoir and a travel book. I hope it is a helpful source for those going there to live or tour and an enjoyable story for those who arent.
The food plants of an area provide the material basis for the survival of its population, and furnish inspiring stimuli for cultural development. There are two parts in this book. Part 1 introduces the cultural aspects of Chinese food plants and the spread of Chinese culinary culture to the world. It also describes how the botanical and cultural information was acquired; what plants have been selected by the Chinese people for food; how these foodstuffs are produced, preserved, and prepared; and what the western societies can learn from Chinese practices. Part 2 provides the botanical identification of the plant kingdom for the esculents used in China as food and/or as beverage. The plants are illustrated with line drawings or composite photographic plates. This book is useful not only as a text for general reading, but also as a work reference. Naturally, it would be a useful addition to the general collection of any library.
In this biography of Tsar Teh-yun, centenarian poet, calligrapher, and qin master, Professor Bell Yung tells the story of a life steeped in the refined arts faithful to the traditional way of the Chinese literati. Set in the two cities of Shanghai and Hong Kong, this book recounts the experiences of an individual who lived through war, displacement, exile, and unrequited longing for home and for a style of living lost forever. Yet Madame Tsar sustained, as one of its last exemplars, much of that style of living despite being a woman in the largely male world of the refined arts. The author weaves a picture of an extraordinary but also tragic figure: extraordinary as daughter, wife, mother, and a celebrated musician, poet, and calligrapher; tragic as a member of the literati exiled from Shanghai to Hong Kong and always longing for the lost world of the refined arts. She was known particularly for her accomplishments as a teacher and performer on the qin – instrument par excellence of the literati. The book delves into her teaching method and musical style to a degree rarely found in the literature of this kind, and is thus an important contribution to musicological study. Through this life of one member of China's last generation of literati, Professor Yung provides rich material for anyone interested in the cultural and social history of twentieth-century China, especially for those with a special interest in qin music, or the place of women in this period.
Eine hinreißende Geschichte über Pflanzen, Liebe und die Wissenschaft Hope Jahren hat das, wovon viele Menschen träumen: einen Beruf, der ihr Herz und ihr Leben erfüllt. Seit sie denken kann, ist die Geo-Biologin fasziniert von der Natur – von Pflanzen, Bäumen, Blättern, Samenkörnern und den unglaublichen Geschichten, die sie uns erzählen, sogar noch in fossiler Form. Wie ist es beispielsweise möglich, dass ein Kirschkern hundert Jahre lang geduldig warten kann, bis er sich auf einmal dazu entscheidet zu keimen? Hope Jahrens Werdegang von der kindlichen Forscherin zur angesehenen Wissenschaftlerin, die sich trotz zahlreicher Hindernisse in einer Männerwelt behauptet, ist eine inspirierende und mitreißende Geschichte voller Leidenschaft, Durchhaltevermögen und ewiger Neugierde. Ein wunderbares Gleichnis über die Kraft der Natur und die Freude des Entdeckens, das einen ganz neuen Blick auf die Pflanzenwelt eröffnet. Seite für Seite. Blatt für Blatt. Für die New York Times ist Hope Jahrens »Blattgeflüster« eines der 100 besten Bücher des Jahres 2016.
This Asian ecology book offers an overview of the plant life of the vast Pacific region. Among the topics covered are the tropical forest and jungles, the grasslands, the primary and secondary forest, and the plants of the seashores. Weeds and cultivated plants are also discussed with overviews of plant distribution and notes on specific islands and island groups. Plant Life of the Pacific World will fill a great need as an important reference source not only for the ethnobotanist but for the professional botanist and the student interested in the flora of the Pacific basin. The information it contains—adequately detailed and clearly presented—should also open the eyes of both visitors and inhabitants to the natural riches of the Pacific region.
To introduce this collection of research studies, which stem from the pro grams conducted by The World Phenomenology Institute, we need say a few words about our aims and work. This will bring to light the significance of the present volume. The phenomenological philosophy is an unprejudiced study of experience in its entire range: experience being understood as yielding objects. Experi ence, moreover, is approached in a specific way, such a way that it legitima tizes itself naturally in immediate evidence. As such it offers a unique ground for philosophical inquiry. Its basic condition, however, is to legitimize its validity. In this way it allows a dialogue to unfold among various philosophies of different methodologies and persuasions, so that their basic assumptions and conceptions may be investigated in an objective fashion. That is, instead of comparing concepts, we may go below their differences to seek together what they are meant to grasp. We may in this way come to the things them selves, which are the common objective of all philosophy, or what the great Chinese philosopher Wang Yang Ming called "the investigation of things". It is in this spirit that the Institute's programs include a "cross-cultural" dialogue meant to bring about a profound communication among philosophers in their deepest concerns. Rising above artificial cultural confinements, such dialogues bring scholars, thinkers and human beings together toward a truly human community of minds. Our Institute unfolds one consistent academic program.
Plant Life of Kentucky is the first comprehensive guide to all the ferns, flowering herbs, and woody plants of the state. This long-awaited work provides identification keys for Kentucky's 2,600 native and naturalized vascular plants, with notes on wildlife/human uses, poisonous plants, and medicinal herbs. The common name, flowering period, habitat, distribution, rarity, and wetland status are given for each species, and about 80 percent are illustrated with line drawings. The inclusion of 250 additional species from outside the state (these species are "to be expected" in Kentucky) broadens the regional coverage, and most plants occurring from northern Alabama to southern Ohio to the Mississippi River (an area of wide similarity in flora) are examined, including nearly all the plants of western and central Tennessee. The author also describes prehistoric and historical changes in the flora, natural regions and plant communities, significant botanists, current threats to plant life, and a plan for future studies. Plant Life of Kentucky is intended as a research tool for professionals in biology and related fields, and as a resource for students, amateur naturalists, and others interested in understanding and preserving our rich botanical heritage.
Reveals everyday life in ancient China through an account in graphic novel format of an ordinary day for a peasant family growing rice during the Han Dynasty.
Explores the vitality of China and the Chinese
This book is a fascinating history of tea and the spreading of tea throughout the world. Camellia sinensis, commonly known as tea, is grown in tea gardens and estates around the world. A simple beverage, served either hot or iced, tea has fascinated and driven us, calmed and awoken us, for well over two thousand years. The most extensive and well presented tea history available, Tea: The Drink that Changed the World tells of the rich legends and history surrounding the spread of tea throughout Asia and the West, as well as its rise to the status of necessity in kitchens around the world. From the tea houses of China's Tang Dynasty (618-907), to fourteenth century tea ceremonies in Korea's Buddhist temples' to the tea plantations in Sri Lanka today, this book explores and illuminates tea and its intricate, compelling history. Topics in Tea: The Drink that Changed the World include: From Shrub to Cup: and Overview. History and Legend of tea. Tea in Ancient China and Korea. Tea in Ancient Japan. The Japanese Tea Ceremony. Tea in the Ming Dynasty. Tea Spreads Throughout the World. The British in India, China and Ceylon. Tea in England and the United States. Tea Today and Tomorrow. Whether you prefer green tea, back tea, white tea, oolong tea, chai, Japanese tea, Chinese tea, Sri Lankan tea, American tea or British tea, you will certainly enjoy reading this history of tea and expanding your knowledge of the world's most celebrated beverage.
The first to come upon the bounty of Chinese flowers were Catholic missionary priests who were also remarkable botanists. They spent hours collecting in their districts, and sending dry specimens back to European botanists. Many of the plants they discovered carry their names, but few know of the David behind Davidia involucrata, or the Hugonis of Rosa hugonis. The chapters in this work focus primarily on the lives of four great French missionary botanists--Pere Armand David, Pere Jean Marie Delavay, Pere Guilaume Farges, and Pere Jean Andre Soulie--and also a group of other French priests and Franciscan missionaries who collected, in addition to one German pastor, the only Protestant missionary to make significant plant collections. Pere David is among the best known, having discovered the Giant Panda, but the others have disappeared into the thick of history. This book will help ensure that today's gardeners and botanists appreciate the debt owed to this obscure group, drawing on their journals, drawings, and other historical documents.

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