A history of natural disasters and scientific discoveries chronicles man's struggle to understand the sea and use that knowledge to predict such phenomena as storm surges, floods, and tsunamis.
Japan’s March 11, 2011 triple horror of earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear meltdown is its worst catastrophe since Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Recovery remains an ongoing ordeal. Japan's Responses to the March 2011 Disaster: Our Inescapable In-between uncovers the pivotal role of longstanding cultural worldviews and their impact on responses to this gut-wrenching disaster. Through unpacking the pivotal notion in Japanese ethics of aidagara, or “in-betweenness,” it offers testament to a deep-rooted sense of community. Accounts from survivors, victims’ families, key city officials, and volunteers reveal a remarkable fiber of moral grit and resilience that sustains Japan’s common struggle to rally and carve a future with promise and hope. Calamities snatch us out of the mundane and throw us into the intensity of the moment. They challenge our moral fiber. Trauma, individual and collective, is the uninvited litmus test of character, personal and social. Ultimately, whether a society rightfully recovers from disaster has to do with its degree of connectedness, the embodied physical, interpersonal, face-to-face engagement we have with each other. As these stories bring to light, along with Michael Brannigan’s extensive research, personal encounters with survivors, and experience as a volunteer in Japan’s stricken areas, our degree of connectedness determines how we in the long run weather the storm, whether the storm is natural, technological, or human. Ultimately, it illustrates that how we respond to and recover after the storm hinges upon how we are with each other before the storm.
In part 2, the history of the idea of atoms is reviewed, and then the scientific evidence for their existence, with Rutherford's discovery of the atomic nucleus. The investigation of what the nucleus is like follows, including the discovery of the neutron, followed by that of the neutrino - of which there are several different kinds - and the muon as well as the pion. The important work of Paul Dirac is described, as well as the discovery of the positron and other antiparticles. The ways by which particles are discovered, by cloud chambers, bubble chambers, etc. are all explained, followed by the invention of the various machines to accelerate particles to high speeds: the cyclotron, the synchrotron, and the bigger and bigger machines, in the US as well as in Switzerland, including their storage rings.
75 games for families to play at the beach, mostly aimed at children ages 2 to 10, with some for teenagers. Most of the games require nothing more than items found naturally on the beach. Family sand silhouettes: Draw an outline of each person lying down in the sand. Use seaweed for hair, clamshells for glasses, pink shells for fingernails, etc. Take pictures! Beach blanket bingo: Find similar pairs of items such as shells, driftwood, rocks. Put one of each into two different piles. Player 1 draws two grids with a shell and places items from one pile into each square of one of the grids. Player 2 gets a quick look at the grid with the items before Player 1 covers it with a beach blanket. Player 2 then has to try to replicate the item placement into the second grid. He gets a point for each one correctly placed.
Water is the world's life source and essential to all living creatures. Although we live on the blue planet, only 3 percent of all our water is drinkable. Yet we've grown accustomed to using it with abandon – individuals consume about 80 to 100 gallons per day adding up to the equivalent of an Olympic sized swimming pool every year. By this decade's end, when the world population is predicted to reach 8 billion, we will face severe shortages. In this ground breaking and forward-looking book, Harvard professor Peter Rogers and former general manager of the San Francisco Utilities Commission, Susan Leal give us a sobering perspective on the water crisis—why it's happening, where it's likely to strike, and what puts the worst strain on our supply. They explain how water's unique status as a renewable but finite resource misleads us into thinking we can always produce more of it. They introduce exciting new technologies that can help revolutionize our consumption of water and explain how different areas of the world have taken the helm in alleviating the burden of water shortages. Rogers and Leal show how it takes individuals at all levels to make this happen, from grassroots organizations who monitor their community's water sources, to local officials who plan years in advance how they will appropriate water, to the national government who can invest in infrastructure for water conservation today. Informed and inspiring, Running out of Water is a clarion call for action and an innovative look at how we as a nation and individuals can confront the crisis.
Tsunamis are water waves triggered by impulsive geologic events such as sea floor deformation, landslides, slumps, subsidence, volcanic eruptions and bolide impacts. Tsunamis can inflict significant damage and casualties both nearfield and after evolving over long propagation distances and impacting distant coastlines. Tsunamis can also effect geomorphologic changes along the coast. Understanding tsunami generation and evolution is of paramount importance for protecting coastal population at risk, coastal structures and the natural environment. Accurately and reliably predicting the initial waveform and the associated coastal effects of tsunamis remains one of the most vexing problems in geophysics, and -with few exceptions- has resisted routine numerical computation or data collection solutions. While ten years ago, it was believed that the generation problem was adequately understood for useful predictions, it is now clear that it is not, especially nearfield. By contrast, the runup problem earlier believed intractable is now well understood for all but the most extreme breaking wave events.
Traces the recent discovery of physics-defying ocean waves at heights previously thought impossible, describing the efforts of the scientific community to understand the phenomenon, the pursuits of extreme surfers to ride these waves, and the destructivecapabilities of tsunamis.
What determines whether complex life will arise on a planet, or even any life at all? Questions such as these are investigated in this groundbreaking book. In doing so, the authors synthesize information from astronomy, biology, and paleontology, and apply it to what we know about the rise of life on Earth and to what could possibly happen elsewhere in the universe. Everyone who has been thrilled by the recent discoveries of extrasolar planets and the indications of life on Mars and the Jovian moon Europa will be fascinated by Rare Earth, and its implications for those who look to the heavens for companionship.
Creation and access to green spaces promotes individual human health, especially in therapeutic contexts among those suffering traumatic events. But what of the role of access to green space and the act of creating and caring for such places in promoting social health and well-being? Greening in the Red Zone asserts that creation and access to green spaces confers resilience and recovery in systems disrupted by violent conflict or disaster. This edited volume provides evidence for this assertion through cases and examples. The contributors to this volume use a variety of research and policy frameworks to explore how creation and access to green spaces in extreme situations might contribute to resistance, recovery, and resilience of social-ecological systems.
Investigates the idea that the natural disaster many scientists suspect caused the extinction of the dinosaurs occurred near Puerto Chicxulub, Mexico, when an asteroid collided with Earth, releasing deadly amounts of energy.
At last, a book that explains in practical terms the concept of calorie restriction (CR)—a life-extending eating strategy with “profound and sustained beneficial effects,” according to the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The concept is simple and flexible: eat fewer calories and choose foods carefully. Longtime CR practitioners and experts Brian M. Delaney and Lisa Walford clearly explain all the relevant health and nutrition guidelines and provide the tools you need to make the appropriate dietary changes. The results can be dramatic; those who follow CR have quickly lowered their cholesterol and blood pressure and reduced their body fat. Recently featured on Oprah and 60 Minutes, CR is continuing to gain momentum. With updated research and new information about exercise and food choices, The Longevity Diet is the key to a longer, healthier life.
Examines the natural history of the tuna, one of the world's most endangered marine animals, revealing how the increasing demand for sushi has caused a devastating overfishing of the tuna and detailing the implications of its potential extinction.
If we are going to promote creativity as an ideal to strive toward, shouldn't we make sure we also instil ethical anticipation so our creative contributions produce a better world rather than chaos and waste? Creativity drives cultural development. We all, directly or indirectly, collaborate in the creation of culture, and we are jointly responsible for the way that culture develops. The goals and decisions we make as both creators and adopters pave pathways into the future for us all. Instead of merely reflecting on past events, Ethical Ripples of Creativity and Innovation educates for 'proflection'—through cases that present what-might-be scenarios for creative contributions that are emerging into mainstream culture, stimulating real-time thinking about creativity-in-action.. This book offers the opportunity to strengthen ethical anticipation by considering the possibilities streaming from current creative offerings that affect our bodies, emotions, selves, and social interactions.
Publisher Fact Sheet A guided tour through the complex world of the UFO/abduction movement.
These collected papers are critical reflections about the rapid digitalization of discourse and culture. This disruptive change in communicative interaction has swept rapidly through major universities, nation states, learned disciplines, leading businesses, and government agencies during the past decade. To commemorate the tenth anniversary of the Center for Digital Discourse and Culture (CDDC) at Virginia Tech, which has been a pioneering leader for many of these changes in university settings, the contributors to this volume examine the transformative implications of digitalizing discourse and culture inside and outside of the academic arena. These technologies of digitalization have created new communities of users, which are highly engaged with their new communicative possibilities, informational content, and discursive forms. Few have asked what these changes will mean, and many of the most important voices engaged in debates about this critical transformation are gathered here in this volume. Each author in his or her own way considers what accepting digital discourse and informational culture now means for contemporary economies, governments, and societies.
It has been nearly 150 years since Darwin published On the Origin of Species, and his theory of natural selection still ignites a forest of heated debate between scientific fundamentalists on the one hand and religious fundamentalists on the other. But both sides actually agree more than they disagree, and what has long been needed is a third way to view evolution, one that focuses more on the aspect of life and “being alive”, one that can guide us through, and perhaps out of, the fiery thicket. This book, a seminal work in the burgeoning field of Biosemiotics, provides that third way, by viewing living beings as genuine agents designing their communication pathways with, and in, the world. Already hailed as the best account of biological hermeneutics, Life As Its Own Designer: Darwin’s Origin and Western Thought is a wholly unique book divided into two parts. The first part is philosophical and explores the roots of rationality and the hermeneutics of the natural world with the overriding goal of discovering how narrative can help us to explain life. It analyzes why novelty is so hard to comprehend in the framework of Western thinking and confronts head-on the chasm between evolutionism and traditional rationalistic worldviews. The second part is scientific. It focuses on the life of living beings, treating them as co-creators of their world in the process of evolution. It draws on insights gleaned from the global activity of the Gaian biosphere, considers likeness as demonstrated on homology studies, and probes the problem of evo-devo science from the angle of life itself. This book is both timely and vital. Past attempts at a third way to view evolution have failed because they were written either by scientists who lacked a philosophical grounding or New Age thinkers who lacked biological credibility. Markoš and his coworkers form an original group of thinkers supremely capable in both fields, and they have fashioned a book that is ideal for researchers and scholars from both the humanities and sciences who are interested in the history and philosophy of biology, biosemiotics, and the evolution of life.
Tom Rea traces the evolution of scientific thought regarding dinosaurs and reveals the deception, hostility, and sometimes outright aggression present in the early years of fossil hunting. This book details one of the most famous—and notorious—dinosaur skeletons ever discovered: Diplodocus carnegii, named after Andrew Carnegie.
In The Empty Ocean, acclaimed author and artist Richard Ellis tells the story of our continued plunder of life in the sea and weighs the chances for its recovery. Through fascinating portraits of a wide array of creatures, he introduces us to the many forms of sea life that humans have fished, hunted, and collected over the centuries, from charismatic whales and dolphins to the lowly menhaden, from sea turtles to cod, tuna, and coral. Rich in history, anecdote, and surprising fact, Richard Ellis’s descriptions bring to life the natural history of the various species, the threats they face, and the losses they have suffered. Killing has occurred on a truly stunning scale, with extinction all too often the result, leaving a once-teeming ocean greatly depleted. But the author also finds instances of hope and resilience, of species that have begun to make remarkable comebacks when given the opportunity. Written with passion and grace, and illustrated with Richard Ellis’s own drawings, The Empty Ocean brings to a wide audience a compelling view of the damage we have caused to life in the sea and what we can do about it. "
“Ebbesmeyer’s goal is noble and fresh: to show how the flow of ocean debris around the world reveals ‘the music’ of the world’s oceans.” —New York Times Book Review Through the fascinating stories of flotsam, one of the Earth’s greatest secrets is revealed. In Flotsametrics and the Floating World, maverick scientist Curtis Ebbesmeyer details how his obsession with floating garbage—from rubber ducks to discarded Nike sneakers—helped to revolutionize ocean science. Scientist and environmentalist David Suzuki, host of CBC TV’s “The Nature of Things,” calls Flotsametrics and the Floating World “Science and storytelling at its very best.” “A very enjoyable, if at times dark, book” (Nature), it is must reading for anyone interested in Oceanography, Environmental Science, and the way our world works.

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